1
   

Which one is correct, "!?" or "?!"?

 
 
camlok
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Aug, 2018 04:41 pm
@InfraBlue,
A clean pair of drawers and you've go them into a right twist, Infra.
camlok
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Aug, 2018 05:49 pm
@InfraBlue,
Quote:
Centrox's proof is lack of evidence that the interobang is used formally.


Mr Standard Formal English even spelled it wrong. centrox gave no proof. He rarely does because searching for proof will make him realize just how little he knows about how the English language works.

Quote:
In 1968 an Interrobang key was available on some Remington typewriters, and into the 70s, some Smith-Corona typewriters incorporated it, although not a standard mark. In the 60s, it was considered quite en vogue and consequently appeared in some dictionaries and was used in various newspaper and magazine articles.

https://dgkayewriter.com/punctuation-familiar-interrobang/


InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Aug, 2018 02:02 pm
@camlok,
M-hmm.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Aug, 2018 02:08 pm
@camlok,
camlok wrote:

InfraBlue wrote:
Centrox's proof is lack of evidence that the interobang is used formally.


Mr Standard Formal English even spelled it wrong. centrox gave no proof. He rarely does because searching for proof will make him realize just how little he knows about how the English language works.

There are no misspellings in what centrox wrote.

Clearly, you have no notion of how proof works.

camlok wrote:
Quote:
In 1968 an Interrobang key was available on some Remington typewriters, and into the 70s, some Smith-Corona typewriters incorporated it, although not a standard mark. In the 60s, it was considered quite en vogue and consequently appeared in some dictionaries and was used in various newspaper and magazine articles.

https://dgkayewriter.com/punctuation-familiar-interrobang/

It's use by a few publications was a passing fad according to your article. This as well doesn't contradict what centrox had asserted.
camlok
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Aug, 2018 02:18 pm
@InfraBlue,
Quote:
There are no misspellings in what centrox wrote.


Two separate sentences, Infra. I thought being a know nothing prescriptivist was supposed to make one better at English.

Quote:
It's[sic] use by a few publications was a passing fad according to your article. This as well doesn't contradict what centrox had asserted.


As I said, it now exists for all to use, in SWE and in informal writing. Neither centrox nor you know how much it is used. I suspect not much, which is confirmed in the M-W description.
camlok
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Aug, 2018 02:20 pm
@InfraBlue,
Quote:
Clearly, you have no notion of how proof works.


What a laugh! Not a one of your cowardly compatriots have the guts to show they know how proof works, and apparently, neither do you. Or centrox.
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Aug, 2018 03:25 pm
@camlok,
You've failed to provide it for the assertions you've made, and have ignored the points I've made showing that the articles you've posted don't contradict centrox's assertions.

All you've provided is what amounts to saying, "Uh-huh!".
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Aug, 2018 03:39 pm
@camlok,
camlok wrote:

Quote:
There are no misspellings in what centrox wrote.


Two separate sentences, Infra. I thought being a know nothing prescriptivist was supposed to make one better at English.

Which sentences are those?

camlok wrote:
InfraBlue wrote:
It's[sic] use by a few publications was a passing fad according to your article. This as well doesn't contradict what centrox had asserted.


As I said, it now exists for all to use, in SWE and in informal writing. Neither centrox nor you know how much it is used. I suspect not much, which is confirmed in the M-W description.

One thing is that the typeface character exists for all to use. Quite another thing is the interrobang's use in formal writing. Except for the few instances referred to in the article you dredged up, it hasn't been used in formal writing. It's use never caught on. It's limited, faddish use did not establish a standard for its formal use.
camlok
 
  1  
Reply Thu 30 Aug, 2018 03:51 pm
@InfraBlue,
Quote:
One thing is that the typeface character exists for all to use. Quite another thing is the interrobang's use in formal writing. Except for the few instances referred to in the article you dredged up, it hasn't been used in formal writing. It's use never caught on. It's limited, faddish use did not establish a standard for its formal use.


%".
0 Replies
 
 

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