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NHL 2004-05: Did you miss it?

 
 
Child of the Light
 
  1  
Reply Tue 18 Jan, 2005 04:37 pm
I think I'd allow the original 6, and the teams of the 1st expansion. No other teams allowed.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Feb, 2005 04:30 pm
Source: NHL ready to cancel season

NEW YORK (AP) -- With no miracle save in sight and a weekend deadline long gone, the NHL made plans for a news conference Tuesday to cancel what little remained of a season already decimated by a lockout.

A public relations executive, speaking on condition of anonymity, told The Associated Press that planning was under way Monday for NHL commissioner Gary Bettman to make the announcement at a news conference in New York.

The Canadian Press, citing an unidentified source, said Bettman will cancel the season at the news conference.

The NHL would become the first major professional league in North America to cancel an entire season because of a labor dispute. This would mark the first time the Stanley Cup was not awarded since a flu epidemic canceled the finals in 1919.
(article)
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Wed 16 Feb, 2005 06:37 pm
its offical...

Game over
Unable to reach deal, Bettman cancels NHL season


NEW YORK (AP) -- A hockey season on the brink is now a season gone bust.

The NHL canceled what was left of its decimated schedule Wednesday after a round of last-gasp negotiations failed to resolve differences over a salary cap -- the flash-point issue that led to a lockout.

It's the first time a major pro sports league in North America lost an entire season to a labor dispute. The resulting damage could be immeasurable to hockey, which already has limited appeal in the United States.

"This is a sad, regrettable day that all of us wish could have been avoided," NHL commissioner Gary Bettman said.

"Every day that this thing continues we don't think it's good for the game," NHLPA executive director Bob Goodenow said in Toronto.
(the rest...)
0 Replies
 
BenDover
 
  1  
Reply Thu 17 Feb, 2005 05:56 pm
i really love sports but i dont really miss hocky it is fun to be at and watch but im not goin ta miss it. players are gready basterds they should not want a lot of money they should play for the love of the game it should be that way in all sports
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2005 12:43 pm
Quote:
"This is a sad, regrettable day that all of us wish could have been avoided," NHL commissioner Gary Bettman said.

Which also, coincidentally, describes the day that Gary Bettman became the NHL commissioner.
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panzade
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2005 12:49 pm
damn, that poutine avatar makes me hungry. Good live hockey food
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Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 22 Feb, 2005 01:25 pm
i think it was george vescey of the NYT who said he recently tuned in to an arena football game... so he could get an eyeful of the boards...
does anyone know the derivation of the yellow strip running along the base of the board? and why do the habs have a blue one?

http://pr.concordia.ca/publications/RRWS/images/photo.student.goalie.jpg
0 Replies
 
NeoGuin
 
  1  
Reply Wed 23 Feb, 2005 06:42 am
What worries me more is that I fear what happened in the NHL could easily happen in Baseball unless something is done to stop the salary spiral.
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Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Thu 3 Mar, 2005 03:42 am
NHL for Sale?
Two firms propose $3.5B bid to buy all 30 NHL teams

TORONTO (AP) -- A Wall Street buyout firm and a sports advisory company reportedly made a joint proposal to buy all 30 NHL teams for as much as $3.5 billion.

Bain Capital Partners LLC and Game Plan International, both based in Boston, made the offer in a 30-minute presentation to NHL owners on Tuesday in New York, sources told the Toronto Star. The companies were invited to make their pitch by NHL commissioner Gary Bettman.

Bain managing partner Steven Pagliuca, co-owner of the NBA's Boston Celtics, and Game Plan, which recently acted as an adviser on the sale of the Ottawa Senators, are betting that many NHL owners would welcome the chance to get out of the hockey business.

The NHL, which because of its ongoing player lockout recently became the first major North American pro sports league to cancel an entire season, has said its teams have lost a collective $500 million over the past two seasons.

It's unclear if team owners, especially those in large markets such Toronto, Boston and New York, would accept the offer. Maple Leafs officials declined comment, as did a Game Plan spokesman.

NHL executive vice president Bill Daly was cautious in describing the level of interest the proposal received from the governors.

"I'm not going to characterize it," Daly told the Globe and Mail. "I would imagine different clubs had different feelings. The board listened to a presentation and that's about it."

Daly said the league was compelled to listen based on the significance of the offer.

"When someone's offering over $3 billion, we felt we had an obligation to the board to have them, at least, hear it from the proposed purchaser," Daly added.

The purchase would not be dependent on the NHL reaching agreement with the players on a collective bargaining deal, and a sale would not affect the status of the NHL Players' Association as the bargaining agent for players under U.S. and Canadian labor laws.

According to Bain and Game Plan, the sale would bolster the league's revenue because all of the teams would work together to generate more local television, sponsorship and revenue instead of competing against one another. The consortium told the NHL owners it had arranged for a large Canadian-based financier to join its efforts.
(source)
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Ray
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Mar, 2005 12:10 pm
BTW, are the owners really losing money? Don't they get out of tax charges or something if their income report is lower, and don't they get money from merchandise sales?
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Sun 6 Mar, 2005 05:29 pm
owners are in it for the money, so it follows that they prolly aren't losing any... although its highly doubtful they're moving much merchandise these days either...
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Mar, 2005 11:34 am
Quote:

Saturday, 12 March, 2005

NHL exiles bring ice show to Russia

By Sarah Rainsford
BBC Russia correspondent in Voskresensk


Russian sports fans are currently enjoying a rare treat, thanks to a bitter wage dispute in North America.

The decision by the North American ice hockey league, the NHL, to cancel its entire season following a lockout left hundreds of highly paid sporting superstars out of work.

But rather than hang up their skates, more than 70 are now playing in Russia.

They are a huge success with the public, but conditions for the stars are not quite what they are used to.

Bryan Allen was drafted in from Vancouver to Voskresensk - one of 7 NHL refugees signed by the Russian club to help them to the Superleague play-offs.

Approaching the town on the two-hour drive from Moscow, billboards welcome visitors to the "Ice Hockey Capital".

In fact Voskresensk is a nondescript place, made even more anonymous by a heavy snowfall.

But it is dominated by its Ice Palace: home to the Voskresensk Chemists, and gleaming after a $10 m facelift.

High class

Inside, Bryan Allen and the other NHL newcomers fly through their paces on the ice. "Russia is really lucky this wage row happened," coach Gennady enthuses, watching from the sidelines.


"There are NHL players at almost every club here now - and they'll definitely leave a legacy: some techniques, some tactics maybe. As for the fans, this is their opportunity to see high-class hockey first hand."

For the visiting players, it is a chance to keep fit and keep earning during the lockout.

But adjusting to Russia has not been entirely smooth skating.

When Gennady gathers the team around him to explain the drill, the foreigners are clearly struggling.

"It's really tough," Bryan Allen admits later.

"It's all in Russian. Sometimes I try to go to the end of the line - or just play it by ear. I've messed up a few times, but they've been pretty lenient!"It is quite a come-down for him in the team kitchen, too.

At dinner he tries out his semi-Russian on the chef before shrugging and pointing instead.

The pile of rice and bread he eventually sits down to are not quite the five-star service the NHL players are used to.

"The culture shock was pretty intense: the food, the way of life, everything," Bryan confesses - something of an understatement judging by his wide-eyed look.

And he is still adjusting to the shock news that the hockey season at home has been abandoned altogether.

'Worth the money'

Small-town Voskresensk is far from glamorous but the locals are extremely proud of their ice hockey history.

The club coached some of the greatest names in the game, including the first Russian player to transfer to America.

For now, that tradition lives on.

But Russia's vast oil wealth is already creating some serious new sponsors for sport, so managers here hope this temporary reversal of player traffic will soon become a regular feature.

"Russia has been paying more than the Europeans for players for some time," insists Alexander Tikhoneko, General Director of the Voskresensk Chemists.

"There are plenty of wealthy clubs here now who can afford expensive players. That's a real breakthrough. If we're not up to NHL level yet - then we are definitely getting close."


He won't say how much it cost to sign his new players, but Alexander is adamant they're worth it.

They've certainly boosted ticket sales significantly.

When the Chemists file out onto the ice that night to take on Lada from Togliatti the stands are packed with fans.

"It's fantastic we can see players like Bryan Allen in real life!" Yury enthuses. "In the old days we had to learn from them by watching TV."

But this particular encounter proves money is no guarantee of success. It ends 3 - 1 to the car makers and descends into an almighty brawl.

Even so, it's another hit match with the fans. After all, they know this show's in town for one season only.

Source
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Thu 24 Mar, 2005 11:02 am
NHL cancels 2005 entry draft

NEW YORK (AP) -- Its season already called off, the NHL on Thursday canceled its 2005 entry draft that had been scheduled for June in Ottawa.

"In the absence of a collective bargaining agreement, we are not able to conduct an entry draft in the traditional sense on the dates scheduled," Bill Daly, the NHL's chief legal officer, said in a statement.

The NHL said there was no immediate word on when Ottawa will host a draft "although the league is committed to bringing an entry draft to Ottawa as soon as is feasible."

The league had been facing a deadline on hotel rooms reserved for the June 25-26 draft at Corel Centre.

Daly apologized to fans, the city of Ottawa and "to everyone who already had put so much time and effort into creating a memorable weekend for the players and their families."
(article)
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jul, 2005 08:50 pm
Its FINALLY Over (thanx bobsmythhawk)

the question is -- does anyone really care anymore, and how much irreparable damage has been done by this prolonged work stoppage?
0 Replies
 
Intrepid
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jul, 2005 08:53 pm
I didn't miss the 2004/05 season and I will not miss the 2005/06 season. I got along just fine without the NHL. There was lots of quality International and Junior hockey to watch. It is over for them in more ways than one.
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Ray
 
  1  
Reply Wed 13 Jul, 2005 08:55 pm
anyone want to talk about the rule changes?
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2005 04:14 am
2005-06 rules changes
New rules? How hockey could change

July 14, 2005

Shootouts? Four more playoff teams? Bigger nets? The NHL has recommended some major rule changes for this season. Players and the NHL board of governors would have to ratify the changes, but it appears many will be approved. Red Wings general manager Ken Holland discussed his thoughts about some of the rule changes with the Free Press in a recent interview.


•No more ties or overtime ties: If a game is tied after regulation, the teams will play a five-minute, four-on-four overtime. If nothing is settled, they then will play a three-minute, three-one-three overtime. If no score, it goes to a shootout involving three players. This could be a regular-season-only change. Overtime or shootout winners earn two points, the loser gets none. "There's a real feeling amongst the managers that somehow, someway, at the end of the night, we need a winner and a loser," Holland said. "There's talk about going to a shootout. There's talk about a three-on-three. Is it going to be a combination of both?"


•Four more teams in the playoffs: The NHL already sends 16 of 30 teams to the playoffs. Two more teams from each conference would be added. Seeds Nos. 7, 8, 9 and 10 would play a best-of-three preliminary playoff round before the four best-of-seven rounds get under way.


•Reduced size of goaltenders' equipment: Already agreed to by players and owners. "There's no doubt," Holland said. "Goalies are going to look a little sleeker." The size of the nets might be bigger or moved to increase scoring. "There's been some discussion of moving the nets back," Holland said.


•Some other possible changes: Introduction of no-touch icing, no line changes on icing, removal of the center red line and the return of tag-up offsides. "The elimination of the red line ... it's something that's being seriously considered," Holland said. "The tag-up is in." Holland added: "I don't see us doing a lot of big radical moves, but I see a lot of small moves that in the end might add up to making the game a little more wide-open -- a little more exciting."
(source)
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2005 05:58 am
Re: 2005-06 rules changes
My replies are in red. I'm glad the strike's over so at least concession stands people can make more profits, but I suspect it'll be a while before the league is back in the good graces of the public. Smile

Region Philbis wrote:
New rules? How hockey could change

...
•No more ties or overtime ties: Fine with me, the ties have always seemed to be meaningless, IMHO.

•Four more teams in the playoffs: Gawd, pretty soon my grandmother will be in the playoffs, and she's been dead since '80. That's absurd. Baseball and basketball already have overly bloated playoff schedules and that's, I believe, one of the bigger reasons why ratings were so lousy for this year's NBA finals. This just adds to the pain. Make it stop! Just say no to playoff rounds! I know, I know, it's just to get yet more games on the air, and I suppose it's better than a rousing show like "I want to marry a millionaire alien!", but really, can't the powers that be see what it's doing to other sports?


•Reduced size of goaltenders' equipment: Fine in some ways, and I'm all for modernizing equipment so long as the players stay safe. Will higher scores spark more interest in the game? I don't know, when the bats were really loud in baseball a few years ago, there was more interest, but now we're all suffering a steroid headache, e. g. we're all learning just how and why there were so many home runs. Not saying the same will be true for hockey, but an increase in scores seems gimmicky to me. Once games routinely become 16 - 14 affairs, the novelty will wear off.


•Some other possible changes: Introduction of no-touch icing, no line changes on icing, removal of the center red line and the return of tag-up offsides. I don't really know enough to be able to comment on these.
(source)
0 Replies
 
jpinMilwaukee
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2005 10:34 am
The problem with hockey (and has been for some time) is the lack of visibility. The Wirtz family for years has fought showing Blackhawk games on tv unless the game is a sellout. No tv = no interest = no new fans = no sellouts = no tv. I haven't been able to watch a Blackhawks game for years now. The result is hockey, which used to be my favorite sport, has faded into a nice memory of years past. Now I watch baseball.

A Salary cap will help. More scoring will help (smaller pads for goalies). More teams in the playoffs are just ridiculous.

Getting rid of the red line might help as well. It will mean less stopage of play and keep peoples interests longer.
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Ray
 
  1  
Reply Thu 14 Jul, 2005 02:01 pm
I like the four more teams in the playoff one. I mean, the lower seeds would have to play preliminary rounds to get into the playoff so they're not exactly in the playoff, but I see it as a playoff to get to the playoff.

I'm not sure about the bigger nets. I have always thought that hockey nets are really small, but I don't want to see the oval nets.

No red line? Not too sure about this one, but it could work. tag-up offsides are okay as well. The icing rule is good I think. I've heard that they don't have to touch the puck but has to get their stick over the line for it to either be play on or not.

Quote:
The problem with hockey (and has been for some time) is the lack of visibility. The Wirtz family for years has fought showing Blackhawk games on tv unless the game is a sellout. No tv = no interest = no new fans = no sellouts = no tv. I haven't been able to watch a Blackhawks game for years now. The result is hockey, which used to be my favorite sport, has faded into a nice memory of years past. Now I watch baseball.


So it's true... Too bad that there are no tv times in your place. I think the NHL really needs to focus on advertising the game.
0 Replies
 
 

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