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Girl (13) Forced To Marry Her Rapist Step-Brother

 
 
Miller
 
Reply Tue 20 Dec, 2016 01:04 am
Girl (13) forced to marry her 'rapist' step-brother

Harriet Agerholm

Published19/12/2016 | 19:24

A man in his twenties has married his 13-year-old step-sister after making her pregnant.

The marriage took place in the northwest region of Kef in Tunisia, in the presence of their parents who had previously attempted to stop the wedding.

Although having sex with someone under the age of 15 is punishable by up to six years in prison under Tunisian law, according to article 277 of the country’s criminal code, if no force was used during the attack an alleged rapist can halt his prosecution by marrying his victim.

Chokri Mejri, a spokesperson for the court, claimed the girl “was not raped”.

“We interviewed the girl and after verifying all the details, we considered her fit for marriage,” Mr Mejri said.

The North African country has lead the way on advancing women’s rights within the Arab world, yet gender stereotypes and archaic laws remain ingrained in its justice system.

The court’s decision has enraged Tunisians who demonstrated outside the country’s parliament on Wednesday holding placards bearing messages such as: “How I met your mother? I raped her when she was 13.”

Tunisia’s prime minister said on Friday discussion of a bill to change the law should be a “priority” ahead of a review of “all articles concerning the fight against violence targeting women".

A bill to counter violence against women was drafted in 2014 but is still waiting to be discussed in parliament.

“Our country can no longer refer to laws that are old-fashioned and which do not reflect the spirit of rights and liberties,” Youssef Chahed told Mosaique FM radio, vowing that 2017 would be “the year of the child”.

He said he would work to form a plan to improve the lives of children in the country, with a particular emphasis on education.

A planned wedding party for the girl involved in the case has been cancelled after the government's child protection office called for the marriage to be annulled.

“When it's a 13-year-old child, we can't talk of sexual relations with consent. It's rape,” representative Houda Abboudi said.

“The court's decision didn't take into account the interests of this child [...] who will marry her rapist.” she added.

The President of the Tunisian Association of Democratic Women, Monia Ben Jemia, demanded the repeal of article 227, telling Le Parisien it was “scandalous” that a judge could consider a 13-year-old girl “willing”, particularly since Tunisian schools do not provide any sex education.

Women in the country are discouraged from filing complaints of rape and are often feel made to feel as though they are bringing shame on their families by speaking about their sexual abuse, according to a 2015 report by Amnesty International into women's rights in Tunisia.

In October a Tunisian talkshow host sparked controversy after he said a 14-year-old rape victim should marry her alleged attacker to “close the case” and “contain the situation”.

A similar draft bill in Turkey that would have allowed a child rapist to go free if he married his victim was thrown out after demonstrators took the streets.

In Lebanon, women in wedding dresses have protested a law stipulating that a seven-year-jail term for rape can be avoided if a rapist marries his victim

www.independent.com
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Foofie
 
  2  
Reply Tue 20 Dec, 2016 03:25 pm
The benefactor of the marriage might be the child that is not born out of wedlock? If being born out of wedlock is a lifelong stigma, then I'd say the marriage had a beneficial effect. I wouldn't bet that you'd agree with me, as a "thoroughly modern Miller."
Miller
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 10:16 am
@Foofie,
With the high rate today, of out-of-wedlock births, I'd say that for many races or ethnic groups, it doesn't seem to matter whether or not the parents ( man and woman ) are married.

It used to be in the US, that the birth certificate would indicate whether the baby was legitimate or not. Not any longer, I'm afraid. Likewise, race is also not indicated on the BC any longer in the US.

This could all change after Jan. 2017 with the arrival of President Trump in the White House.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 10:27 am
@Miller,
This is not in a Western culture. You have no idea about what is best to do in this culture. Your culture has a brutal history of imperialism where other cultures were stamped out of existence. What gives you the right to now judge the cultural practices in Tunisia? It is ridiculous.


How is this not an example of cultural imperialism?
Miller
 
  0  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 10:30 am
@maxdancona,
Have a happy, happy New Year! Drunk
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 10:35 am
@Miller,
Thank you Miller.

And besides, if I remember correctly you are Jewish. This practice of marriage after having sex is a common part of many cultures, including Judaism under the Law of Moses.

Deuteronomy 22 wrote:
If a man happens to meet a virgin who is not pledged to be married and rapes her and they are discovered, he shall pay her father fifty shekels of silver. He must marry the young woman, for he has violated her. He can never divorce her as long as he lives.


It is never valid to judge cultural practices of other cultures based on your own biases.
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 03:15 pm
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:

This is not in a Western culture. You have no idea about what is best to do in this culture. Your culture has a brutal history of imperialism where other cultures were stamped out of existence. What gives you the right to now judge the cultural practices in Tunisia? It is ridiculous.


How is this not an example of cultural imperialism?


Please allow me to intrude with my two cents. Her "right to now judge the cultural practices in Tunisia" might be coming from the same place your judging the cultural practices of rural WASP America comes from during the recent campaign. The psychological term is, "reaction formation" I believe.

maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 03:45 pm
@Foofie,
I have every moral right to judge and criticize my own culture. The US culture is my culture.

I was born and raised in the United States. I live fully in the Western Culture as practiced in the United States. I understand very well how moral judgments are made and how social structures function within the US culture.

I have very little knowledge, context, experience or ownership of the Tunisian culture. It isn't my culture (although my knowledge of the Jewish Law in the time of Moses does provide a point of reference, that is just an abstract, intellectual point of connection).

It seems like you are missing the point entirely.
Foofie
 
  0  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 04:01 pm
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:

I have every moral right to judge and criticize my own culture. The US culture is my culture.

I was born and raised in the United States. I live fully in the Western Culture as practiced in the United States. I understand very well how moral judgments are made and how social structures function within the US culture.

I have very little knowledge, context, experience or ownership of the Tunisian culture. It isn't my culture (although my knowledge of the Jewish Law in the time of Moses does provide a point of reference, that is just an abstract, intellectual point of connection).

It seems like you are missing the point entirely.


You are missing my "point entirely" in my opinion. "Reaction formation" is that unconscious psychological ploy to deny one's own feelings, and project them onto someone else. So, while in the campaign threads you have ignored the ethical legitimacy of conservative values, as I understood your postings, you in this thread are telling Miller that she knows nothing about Tunisian social mores, and therefore you delegitamize her perspective.

However, I'm sure you were an excellent physics teacher.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 04:09 pm
@Foofie,
Are you really arguing that Conservative values aren't part of the US culture?

It is funny that you are making this argument (which is far more extreme than anything I would ever say about conservatives).

As long as we agree that Conservatives are part of the United States history and culture, and are operating under the same society that I am a part of, than I have every right to criticize them... and my opposition to some conservative policies on the basis of American values is completely valid.

(For the record, I am not a knee-jerk liberal... where conservatives are right, I agree with them).

The principle is pretty simple. Americans can criticize values, policies or beliefs in the American culture.

Miller
 
  1  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 08:03 pm
@maxdancona,
Quote:
Law in the time of Moses does provide a point of reference...


How about the Law concerning men, who are gay? Do you remember what that Law stated?

Seems strange that one Law says it's OK for a male to rape a young girl and then even beat up his wife, if she DARES to look at another man but not OK for men to have sex with other men...

Aren't both types of "activity", the offspring of a specific culture?
maxdancona
 
  2  
Reply Wed 21 Dec, 2016 08:46 pm
@Miller,
Sure. The Law of Moses proscribed death for homosexuality. But, I didn't live in the Bronze Age Caananite culture that developed the Law of Moses and I had nothing to say about it. Different cultures have different ideas of right and wrong. That's my point.

What's your point?
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Dec, 2016 02:28 pm
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:

Are you really arguing that Conservative values aren't part of the US culture?

It is funny that you are making this argument (which is far more extreme than anything I would ever say about conservatives).

As long as we agree that Conservatives are part of the United States history and culture, and are operating under the same society that I am a part of, than I have every right to criticize them... and my opposition to some conservative policies on the basis of American values is completely valid.

(For the record, I am not a knee-jerk liberal... where conservatives are right, I agree with them).

The principle is pretty simple. Americans can criticize values, policies or beliefs in the American culture.




No. I am not arguing that, "Are you really arguing that Conservative values aren't part of the US culture?" I am just pointing out that you took umbrage with Miller's perspective on what occurred in Tunesia, and you seemed to think that if Miller is not an expert on Tunesian social mores she should not give her opinion. I was just wondering why you had such umbrage about her opinion, seeing as how you are just an American, steeped in the social mores of the U.S.

You seem to get overly excited over nothing of import, in my opinion.
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