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"You and I" vs "You and me" in a sentence with an implied verb

 
 
Reply Fri 16 Dec, 2016 12:10 pm
"And not all homeless are deranged. Some of them are just like you and I —just victims of a different circumstance."

Should this be you and me or you and I? I have someone claiming that the implied verb is "are," as in,

"Some of them are just like you and I are."

And that saying "me" there doesn't make sense. Can someone please clarify?
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 371 • Replies: 2
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contrex
 
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Reply Fri 16 Dec, 2016 01:00 pm
@getting-smart,
There is no "implied verb". "Like you and me" is a shortened way of saying "like you and like me". You can know the correct me/I choice by deleting the 'you and'. Better, you can know it by remembering that we use the pronoun me, along with other objective pronouns such as us, him, her, you, and them, when the pronoun is the object of a verb:

Just like me/him/you/them

Danny thanked them.

The dog followed John and me to the door.


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InfraBlue
 
  0  
Reply Fri 16 Dec, 2016 01:25 pm
@getting-smart,
"Some of them are just like you and I are."

The use of "are" at the end would be redundant.
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