Reply Tue 28 Sep, 2004 07:35 pm
Yesterday it was sunny and 70 degrees; today it has been cloudy and drear. Now at 6pm it is 58 on my back porch. I have a surprise half day off, a2k is back on the burner, and I need to make soup as a personal restoration thing.

Think this one is going to be leek, onion, potato, butter, chicken stock, white wine, tarragon, half and half, parsley, and fontina cheese if I have it.
These are what I have - I think - that fit the Leek Soup recipe in Cooking with Wine, by Virginia and Robert Hoffman, although they mention cream instead of half and half, and I'll throw in some swiss chard (rainbow).

Plus, I don't have real chicken stock, sad to say. I tend to buy packaged veggie and chicken stocks, I like them a lot, but my larder is stock-bare, so I'll cheat with a bouillion product.

Oh, and I don't have any live tarragon in the garden right now.

This is a neat book. I can't help but notice the next recipe is Carrot Chardonay Soup, which seems to involve lots of carrots, shallots, onions, garlic, ginger, honey, rosemary, butter, and whipped cream.

Will be back with a link to the book.

In the meantime, do you ever make soup when the weather turns autumnal? or when you need the restorative effects of the soup making process?







Edit - here's a link. The book features 172 recipes by 86 winery chefs (US)
Cooking with Wine
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Aldistar
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Sep, 2004 07:58 pm
Yes! I love to make soups, as long as I don't have to have them as left overs. Soup does always seem to be a relaxing and fun food to make. I have a really good recipe for cauliflower-cheese soup. It includes cauliflower, white wine, half and half, cheese spread (I finally have a use for the stuff!) and green pepper. If any one wants the full recipe just let me know!
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colorbook
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Sep, 2004 08:07 pm
Just the other day it was 80 degrees, but tonight it will be 47 degrees...it is definitely soup time. I love to make a variety of soups in the colder months, including stews and chowder. I also like to bake different types of breads, biscuits and muffins to go with the soup.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Sep, 2004 08:13 pm
Sounds good right now, Aldistar. I am getting hungry and my soup will take a while.

I think most of us can figure out some of this and some of that, but if anyone wants specifics, we can do it.

I know already what is wrong with my soup substitutions... the chard and the onion I used just now, which was a bermuda (red) onion, will leave what is purported to be a lovely creamy rather white colored soup a little gray. Well, hey, I can fix that, I'll add some enchilada sauce. Kidding, but not entirely.

The cream, or in my case half and half, would go in at the end, and I might not add it.

I might have added some cabbage, if it wasn't at death's door. Talk about clash.

Stay tuned.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Sep, 2004 09:22 pm
Colorbook, I agree with you... I have fall foods, but also comfort foods, to make as much as to eat... soup, a dish of soaking beans, and a bowl of rising dough.

I know you can do beans fast... I like having them sit there in regular time. I am cushioned by having some dough rising... but I don't do either of those so much lately, after a marital split and a lot of moving. But I still have my shoulders rest, and sense of well being rise, with a pot of soup.....
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Sep, 2004 09:46 pm
OK, it's about done. I didn't add two bunches of leek whites, only one, substituted some sliced shard stems. On the other hand, I didn't add the shard greens, as I was going to, since I like the color and taste of the soup as it is.

As to left overs, there will be. I can't slurp a whole pot of soup. But, I can divide it up, take a part to work, and probably freeze another part.

Yayy, turned out ok.

Edit to say it was more than ok, it was really good. I ended up adding a little bit of half and half, with some italian parsley, and not adding cheese.

So, I'd better make notes in the book about what I changed on the recipe...
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Sep, 2004 12:51 am
Funny, I thought of starting a thread about this, too:

not far away from, there's an exhibition about "Soups and terrines"

link to exhibition

At my mother's (my usual place for warm meals, since I cook there daily - not only soups :wink: ), we use a late 19th century earthen terrine [terrine is from Latin 'terra'!], but serve with a great 18th century silver ladle: all the male Hinteler's 'family heads' are graved in it from 18something onwards.
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Sep, 2004 02:51 am
I was just given a crapload of beets, so I'll most likely make a cold soup with roasted beets, orange juice, buttermilk and tarragon.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Sep, 2004 09:52 am
Sounds wonderful, Cav.

And I've always enjoyed terrines, Walter. But I've never seen any in person as gorgeous as those in your link. Wow.
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Eva
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Sep, 2004 10:26 am
I wish I could see that ladle, Walter. What a great family treasure it must be.
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the prince
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Sep, 2004 10:33 am
I like cooking with wine. Sometimes I put it in my food as well Smile

Raw Mangoes 1 kg
Onions 3 medium sized
Garlic 3 cloves
Olive Oil 2 tbsps
Fresh Thyme 1 tsp
Oranje Juice 1/4 cup
Chicken Stock 31/3 cup
Fresh Cream 1/3 cup
Garlic Salt 11/2 tsps
For The Sorbet
Champagne 1/2 cup
Vodka 1/4 cup
Sweet Lime Juice 1/3 cup
Egg White 2 tbsps
Black Salt 1 tbsp


Method of preparation
1. For the sorbet whisk all the ingredients and churn and chill in the pacotel to form the granita- should turn out to be very light and fluffy.
For the soup
2.Peel, wash and chop onions. Peel and crush garlic.
3.Char the mangoes in a clay oven until soft to the core. Remove skin and seed and blend to make a smooth puree.
4.Heat olive oil in a pan and saute chopped onions and crushed garlic till pink. Add fresh thyme and orange juice. Cook till it is reduced slightly and then add mango puree.
5.Pour in chicken stock and simmer slowly for fifteen to twenty minutes till the flavours mix. Puree in a blender and pass through a sieve.
6.Bring the mixture back to a boil and finish with fresh cream and garlic salt. Chill in the refrigerator for six to eight hours and serve chilled with a scoop of vodka granita.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Sep, 2004 10:41 am
That is an impressive recipe. Not all that hard to do, very elegant. What is a pacotel?

I've never made granita or gelato. Have had my eye on an expensive machine. The price just keeps going up...
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Sep, 2004 10:58 am
I am curious about the sorbet as well. By my eye, that would never freeze properly in my machine.
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the prince
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Sep, 2004 11:02 am
The only time I made it, I just put it in the chiller section of my fridge - I have no clue as to what pacotel is to be honest....
0 Replies
 
cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Sep, 2004 11:08 am
I'm guessing a pacotel is an industrial ice cream machine. Hey, G, I found your recipe and some other lovely looking ones (the photos look great): http://www.uppercrustindia.com/6crust/six/mango.htm
0 Replies
 
the prince
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Sep, 2004 11:09 am
Oh right, never heard of that site - I mostly get my recipies from a cookbook/DVDs by a famous Indian cook....
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cavfancier
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Sep, 2004 11:16 am
It must be the same chef. The recipes and pics look amazing, and very 'Michelin'.
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BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Wed 29 Sep, 2004 11:19 am
Gautam
Procedure: Method for the sorbet
Whisk in the above ingredients and churn and chill in the pacotel to form the granite - should turn out to be very light and fluffy.
0 Replies
 
 

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