7
   

BRINING MEATS FOR THE GRILL

 
 
Sun 29 May, 2016 05:47 am
I want to do some pork chops on the grill and Im thinking of brining them and then doing a quick parboil to get em so they wont dry out on the grill.

We dont like too many spices on fine prok chops because of its already excellent pork choppy flavor.
Does par-boiling after brining work with chops? Should I just pr boil em in the brine?
(I usually do chops in a butter fry and that is always good but Ive never had good luck with doing em over charcoal)
 
glitterbag
 
  2  
Sun 29 May, 2016 11:29 am
@farmerman,
I haven't actually tried pork chops on the grill before, but I'm pretty sure if you parboil after brining it negates the brining. How thick are the chops you want to grill?

Hold that thought, I have a grilling guide downstairs I should consult....but I have to dry my hair before I do anything else. Be back later.
farmerman
 
  2  
Sun 29 May, 2016 11:40 am
@glitterbag,
Ill wait.
I was brining them and then parboiling them in the brine
glitterbag
 
  2  
Sun 29 May, 2016 11:51 am
@glitterbag,
FM, are you using a gas grill or charcoal and how thick are your chops? Oh and bone in or not.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  2  
Sun 29 May, 2016 12:21 pm
A lot can change in six months.

farmerman wrote:
I dont consider SALT a flvor.


http://able2know.org/topic/303515-3#post-6077385
glitterbag
 
  2  
Sun 29 May, 2016 12:24 pm
@izzythepush,
Izzy, you have a wicked keen memory.
0 Replies
 
glitterbag
 
  2  
Sun 29 May, 2016 12:44 pm
@farmerman,
Well, my guide offers a few useless recipes. I checked the Williams-Sonoma cookbook, recommends for 1 inch bone in chop, grill on hottest part of the grill 4-5 minutes per side. That applies to gas and charcoal grills.......but the timing seems a little short. Please google recipes for grilled chops, I don't trust my WS, because I haven't tried it before. But if you par-boil it would be shorter. One method I checked claims brining is quicker than marinade and produces a juicy chop.

But I'm buying chops tomorrow, because it sounds so good and I'm weary of chicken.
farmerman
 
  1  
Sun 29 May, 2016 03:57 pm
@izzythepush,
Nothing's changed. Salt is not a flavor. Brining enables the meat to remain moist when its being grilled. Pork chops are not friendly to grilling , they dry as they cook.
Brining retains moisture. It adds relatively little additional saltiness to the meat, just enough that you dont need to add any at table. (BTW, a brine also contains other solubles that ARE flavors, (like molasses or brown sugar)
farmerman
 
  2  
Sun 29 May, 2016 03:59 pm
@glitterbag,
4to5 minutes over a grill will sear the chops and dry them.
Cooking off center with a drip pan and having the meat prboiled in the brine, retains the porky taste with the salt and moisture.

glitterbag
 
  2  
Sun 29 May, 2016 04:07 pm
@farmerman,
Yeah, that's why I said the recipes were suspect. Are you grilling your chops tonight? I bought 2 1-inch bone in chops and plan to try tomorrow.
glitterbag
 
  2  
Sun 29 May, 2016 04:37 pm
@glitterbag,
Tonight we are grilling steaks, they usually work out well (knock on wood) but I'm getting nervous about the pork chops. Thanks big bunches Farmerman, Ive aged 2 weeks thanks to you.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Sun 29 May, 2016 04:41 pm
@glitterbag,
these were thick cut not bone-in. I wanted bone-in biut they were gone (I like chop with it bone, bbettwr flavor)
I did the brine, did a 10 min prboil in the brine and then grilled over chrcoal (Met over a gas grill tastes funny to us and it builds up carbon unless the grill i super clean ). A charcoal grill can take lots of abuse nd I keep like 2 extra grilles to keep em steel brushed clean and thatsa ll.
The chops were very good (Bone-in woulda been better but...) grilled and sprinkled with Goya garlic and pepper sprinkle
glitterbag
 
  2  
Sun 29 May, 2016 05:05 pm
@farmerman,
Oh good, I'm glad they turned out well. We lucked out and found 2 bone-in chops. It's getting difficult to find certain cuts of meat and I go to another grocer to get ground beef. A few of our big grocers no longer have butchers on duty, the meats are being cut and wrapped in a different state. Doesn't work out well for the locals. Many of us are traveling to different areas in the county to purchase meats. I think Wegman's is great, but our local butcher shop closed up about 8 months after Wegman's opened.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  3  
Sun 29 May, 2016 06:14 pm
@farmerman,
There's an America's Test Kitchen recipe that I've been wanting to try where they stuff thick cut pork chops with caramelized onions, smoked gouda and a bit of bbq sauce.

They came up with the recipe as a way to avoid having to brine the chops so I'm guessing that their grilling technique would be fine for brined chops.

They recommend 2.5 minutes per side over the hot part of the grill to sear and 6-8 minutes on the cooler side, covered, to reach 145 degrees, then a 10 minute rest.

I've really liked all of the grilling tips I've learned from ATK so I'm thinking this would be a good way to do pork.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Mon 30 May, 2016 01:18 am
@farmerman,
Have you heard yourself? You want to soak your meat in salt water for hours on end, boil it in salt water and still claim it doesn't make the meat that salty.

And people actually believe that? Now I can see how Trump won the nomination.
farmerman
 
  2  
Mon 30 May, 2016 04:15 am
@izzythepush,
Your comparisons are often quite funny (when Im not the target of your frequent rants).I now see that ,erhaps, your flights away from reason are entirely built upon your defiant ignorance of a subject. Do you understand anything about osmosis or chemical diffusion in solutions on biological tissues? (dead tissues to be exact). If I were to brine a pound of pork in a saturated solution of a pure salt brine and leave it soak overnight, Id be talking about a a sodium loading of about 1100 mg PER POUND.
Thats a saturated solution.
I brine with a combined solution of about 4Tbsp of "sylvite" salt , hard cider, and sugar in a quart of water .(Sylvite is a mix of about 50.50 sodium.potassium salt)
As I calculate, the MAX amount of salt Id have in the meat would approach about 350 mg/pound(If it were a sodium salt mixture entirely) Or about 200 mg Na using sylvite brine.

Since I ate a portion that was less than 1/2 a pound I got loaded up with the death dealing sodium load of about 90mg . Thats an amount thats less than what youd get from a Tbsp of some salad dressing or a meat sauce that youd add atop the cooked meat. We try to support the natural flavor of the meat, not douche it all up with some condiment. When the pork was done on the grill, I used my pepper lemon garnish as the only flavoring, and it was quite delicious and juicy. If youd rather enjoy eating dried up meat fresh from the grille be my guest.( I commented in the past about how the english and irish really have the cookbook written about the myriad ways you can boil the **** out of meats)- not to mention that a rasher of your" bacon" probably could be used as an ice melter (ya certainly cant eat it)
All kidding aside, If you have a concern about your own sodium intake I would check with your doctor (assuming hes familiar with modern dietary restrictions , cardiovascular health and solution chemistry or osmosis).

I even have to watch my K intake because I can get a nasty Hypokalemia which can leave one all stiff and achy. So I adjust my own K intake UPWARD.

If you want to know about salt intakes an brining solution chem, Id be happy to answer reasonable questions. But your snarkiness makes me suspect that youre not seeking knowledge but are looking for opportunities to sound like Jckie Mason or Rowan Atkinson (BB).

ta ta



izzythepush
 
  2  
Mon 30 May, 2016 04:27 am
@farmerman,
All I know is that when I grill pork it doesn't get too dry. It's really not that difficult. Have you tried soaking it in scrumpy, and putting a bit of scrumpy in the base of the grill pan?
farmerman
 
  2  
Mon 30 May, 2016 04:31 am
@farmerman,
Just to finish up. I just scanned our pantry and a Tbsp of "Newman's Own" Lime Salad dressing is 350 mg (sodium). (I normally use an aged balsamic/OO/ pennzy garlicpowder/pepper mix for salads).
A single portion of Campbells chicken noodle soup is about 350 mg.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  3  
Mon 30 May, 2016 04:37 am
The Ontario pea meal bacon, as it is called, is pork backs in a sweet brine. Even after sitting for days, weeks or even months in brine, the meat does not have an overly salty taste. Far less than commercially produced bacon in the American or English style. Those, of course, have nitrates, nitrites, and a generous helping of the healthy fear of a righteous christian god.
farmerman
 
  2  
Mon 30 May, 2016 04:40 am
@izzythepush,
Our pork isnt a "toss up" to being "NOT TOO DRY". I dont want it dry at all. (Besides, IM talking pork chops , not pork in general-all cuts of pork are different).

Look up the Maillard Reaction


































 

Related Topics

Conventional food vs. Organics - Discussion by xperimentalchef
What steak? - Discussion by kev
 
  1. Forums
  2. » BRINING MEATS FOR THE GRILL
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 06/22/2021 at 03:03:02