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Does "via" here mean "and to"?

 
 
Reply Fri 5 Feb, 2016 11:17 am

Context:

Based on 12 (nifty number, that) interviews with notable Christian women, from Helena Kennedy QC to the Dean of York via The Reverend Rose Hudson-Wilkin (Chaplain to the Speaker of the House of Commons), it’s a no-holds-barred tale sharing much of the disappointment, pain and hurt that these women have experienced within what is still overwhelmingly a patriarchal environment. (In Jamaican-born Rose’s case, she has had two kinds of prejudice to contend with ...)

More:
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/womens-business/10714342/Female-vicars-Weve-been-spat-at-sent-porn-and-sexually-harassed.html
 
View best answer, chosen by oristarA
oristarA
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2016 02:17 am
@oristarA,
Well, this thread is abandoned.
Thank you for coming.
0 Replies
 
timur
 
  3  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2016 06:13 am
Via is a Latin word meaning way.

Its used to specify which way you take to get to some place.

So, when in Rome, you can take your route to Brindisi via Via Appia.

But you can end in Samoa.

From what I've been reading lately, you are about to start your Via Dolorosa.

No need for thanks...

oristarA
 
  0  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2016 09:57 am
@timur,

Are you telling me that The Reverend Rose Hudson-Wilkin is in charge of the Dean of York?
And you are already on the way of your Via Dolorosa?
timur
  Selected Answer
 
  3  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2016 10:22 am
@oristarA,
No, I'm not telling you such.

You have a starting point - Helena Kennedy, QC.

You have an ending point - The dean of York (Vivienne Faull)

Between those two points you pass by, or via, the Reverend Rose Hudson-Wilkin.

It's just to mention one of the twelve interviewed.


My way is a sea of roses, nothing that resembles a Via Dolorosa.
oristarA
 
  0  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2016 10:53 am
@timur,
timur wrote:


My way is a sea of roses, nothing that resembles a Via Dolorosa.



That is great.
Congrats then.

http://www.klm.com/travel/en/images/1F7D45CE-66B4-434B-A7E6-E52508A885BF_tcm493-538825_456x456_80.jpg

Ever heard the saying - "The fragrance always clings to the hand that gives the rose"?
0 Replies
 
timur
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2016 12:09 pm
Yep.

Now, it's your turn to learn how to..
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2016 01:30 pm
@timur,
timur wrote:
Via is a Latin word meaning way.

As an aside: "street" (and the German "Straße") comes from 'via strata' (cobblestoned way). ['Via' is "Weg" in German.]
timur
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2016 01:55 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I sometimes keep things simple, aiming at clarity.

But you are right, via is also Weg in German

In Italian it also has a sense of departing:

Gone with the wind - Via col vento.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2016 03:00 pm
@timur,
Similar in German: 'weg' as adverb means away (origianally "enwec" meaning to leave the correct way)
0 Replies
 
 

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