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Brexit. Why do Brits want Out of the EU?

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 17 Sep, 2021 08:58 am
@Walter Hinteler,
EU regulations and, of course, metric systems are abolished: cheers upon cheers!

GOV.UK: Brexit opportunities: regulatory reforms
0 Replies
 
Tryagain
 
  0  
Reply Fri 17 Sep, 2021 03:35 pm
Aukus: US and UK face backlash over Australia defence deal

The move angered France, which said it had been "stabbed in the back", while China accused the three powers of having a "Cold War mentality".

France has said it is recalling its ambassadors in the US and Australia for consultations, in protest at a security deal .
The French foreign minister said the "exceptional decision" was justified by the "exceptional gravity" of situation.

And the pact has raised fears that it could provoke China into a war.

Meanwhile Washington has sought to quell anger in Paris at the pact, which has scuppered a multibillion-dollar submarine deal France had signed with Australia.

France's Foreign Minister Jean-Yves Le Drian called the announcement a "stab in the back".
He called it a "brutal, unilateral and unpredictable decision" that reminded him of former US President Donald Trump.

French diplomats in Washington cancelled a gala to celebrate ties between the US and France in retaliation.

However, due to the propensity of French subs to descend to the ocean floor at the first sight of turmoil and remain there until danger has passed, the EU will offer the UK a defence pact to boost security cooperation between Britain and Brussels after US exit from Afghanistan prompts calls for closer working together.

Dutch PM Mark Rutte is meeting Boris Johnson for a working dinner this evening. Mr Rutte is expected to ask Mr Johnson to agree a new defence pact with the EU.


C'est la vie.
Builder
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 17 Sep, 2021 09:06 pm
@Tryagain,
I think this is more about France's people not toeing the line in regards the ridiculous impositions of the pharmaceutical criminals attempting to stitch up their future control over the lives of every person on the planet.

0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 18 Sep, 2021 09:59 am
@Tryagain,
Tryagain wrote:
C'est la vie.
The Indo-Pacific security pact rendered the delivery of conventional submarines worth 56 billion euros agreed with the French shipping company Naval Group in 2016 obsolete.

Only 15 days ago, the defence and foreign ministers of France and Australia had emphasised the importance of this submarine programme in a joint communiqué.

Le problème du contrat est de savoir sur quoi il se fonde.
Autrement dit: le contrat ne tient pas aux mots, mais aux pensées.
0 Replies
 
Tryagain
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 19 Sep, 2021 03:36 pm
Mais oui!

Warum spielst du die beleidigte Leberwurst?
Ich kriege so eine Krawatte, wenn man mit mir auf Englisch reden will. Ich muss Deutsch üben!
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 19 Sep, 2021 11:18 pm
@Tryagain,
I'm tied into knots now.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Sep, 2021 05:35 am
The British government uses the EU exit for another strange new regulation: cars get a new country number plate.

'A slap in the face for people who are proud to be Great British': Tory fury at move by Grant Shapps to ditch traditional 'GB' sticker in favour of 'UK' - after Sinn Fein complain
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Sep, 2021 09:28 am
Johnson’s claim Dutch PM offered to mediate in Brexit row not true, say sources
Quote:
Boris Johnson has walked into a diplomatic row with one of the UK’s closest allies after claiming the prime minister of the Netherlands had been seeking to “mediate” between Brussels and London over the post-Brexit arrangements for Northern Ireland.

Speaking to reporters on a plane to New York for a meeting of the UN general assembly, the prime minister suggested the Dutch government was looking to act as a mediator between the European Commission and London on the differences that have arisen in recent months.

“I talked to Mark Rutte [the Dutch PM] the other night, who wanted to come and see if he could mediate on the issue and I said, you know, we really want to make progress,” Johnson had said. “We seek a solution, but it has to be one that allows the free movement of goods between all parts of our country.”

Dutch diplomatic sources expressed surprise at the prime minister’s comments, insisting that Rutte had instead specifically urged Johnson to be pragmatic in his dealings with the European Commission.

“The [Dutch] prime minister called on Boris Johnson to be constructive, pragmatic and engage with the commission,” a Dutch diplomatic source said of last week’s meeting between the two leaders. “Both the UK and EU share the responsibility to make the protocol as negotiated and ratified on both sides of the Channel work for the people in Northern Ireland.”
0 Replies
 
Tryagain
 
  0  
Reply Mon 20 Sep, 2021 09:56 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Jetzt haben wir den Salat...

In dramatic style the French are proposing that the British vehicle identifier be changed to PA.

In an effort to appease Pennsylvania (PA) residents and Protonotary Apostolic members, assurances have been sought that the Perfidious Albion will not effect them or their travel arrangements.

The word ‘perfidious’ is an adjective which comes from the Latin noun perfidia.
Albion, meanwhile, means Great Britain or England. It’s also Latin and has been in use since the 12th century.

But where did it come from?

It’s to the French playwright Augustin Louis de Ximénes that the first use of perfidious albion is usually attributed to.

He has a line in his poem L’Ere des Francais (published in 1793) which says:

"Let us attack perfidious Albion in her waters." 

Leben wie Gott in Frankreich

Pâ, is a town in the Pâ Department of Balé Province in south-western Burkina Faso and will not be affected by the license change.

Treppenwitz - Klappe zu, Affe tot.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 20 Sep, 2021 10:26 pm
Trade deal with UK is not a priority for Biden, Boris Johnson accepts
Quote:
Boris Johnson has accepted that the UK will not get a quick trade deal with the US, in an embarrassing admission as he prepares for his first White House meeting with president Joe Biden.

Speaking ahead of Tuesday’s encounter, the prime minister made clear that he recognised a free trade agreement (FTA) with Britain was not a priority for Mr Biden, who he said had “a lot of fish to fry”.

A swift transatlantic FTA was repeatedly trumpeted by Leave campaigners, including Mr Johnson, as the biggest prize from Brexit, and the prime minister made clear on his arrival in Downing Street in 2019 that he was hopeful of a quick deal on tariff-free commerce with the then president Donald Trump.

The Department for International Trade has estimated the benefits of a deal at up to £7.7bn, or 0.36 per cent of GDP – well short of the predicted losses from EU withdrawal.

But the chances of a deal with Mr Trump foundered over UK concerns about chlorinated chicken, hormone-pumped beef and protections for the NHS, and Mr Biden’s arrival in office has pushed the prospect of agreement further into the future.
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Tue 21 Sep, 2021 10:26 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
When Johnson was asked on Tuesday whether he still hoped to strike a free-trade agreement with the US by the time of the next general election, opening the way to lower tariffs and a closer economic relationship, he said “we’re going as fast as we can”, but declined to confirm whether it could be achieved before 2024.

When the US president was asked about the prospects of a deal as the pair met in the Oval Office, he said: “We’re going to talk about trade a little bit today, and we’re going to have to work that through.”

The UK is now understood to be considering alternative options, including seeking to join the US-Canada-Mexico trade deal instead of striking a bilateral agreement with Washington.
The Guardian
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 22 Sep, 2021 11:28 am
Brexit caused huge drop in Great Britain to Ireland exports in 2021
Quote:
Exports from Great Britain to Ireland fell by almost £2.5bn in the first seven months of the year with Brexit emerging as a major factor, according to official Irish government data.

The figures from Ireland’s Central Statistics Office (CSO) come just days after Marks & Spencer said it was scrapping 800 product lines from its stores in the republic of Ireland because of “excessive paperwork” and health controls on food.

The CSO recorded the value of goods imported from Great Britain for January to July 2021 as €6.3bn (£5.4bn), a 32% decrease year on year, equivalent to €2.9bn in sales compared with the same period in 2020.

Imports in July alone were down 32% compared with the same month in 2020, with the largest decrease seen in food and live animals.

These categories of goods have all been subject to new physical and documentary controls on entry to Ireland since Brexit came into force in January.

However goods travelling in the other direction are not subjected to the same controls with the government last week announcing that checks due to be implemented in October and January would be delayed by up to nine months.

The asymmetrical trading relationship now appears to be translating into visible wins and losses. Sales rocketed for Irish traders by almost £500m year on year, up 60% (€567m) in July to €1.5bn, and up 26% in the first seven months of 2021.

The largest increases in sales to Great Britain were in the chemicals and related products sector, which is not yet subjected to the stringent regulatory controls on entering Great Britain.

M&S last week blamed “pointless” paperwork for exports into France and Ireland, announcing it was closing 11 of its French stores because of problems supplying them with fresh produce since Brexit. It has said it will now try to source more product locally in Ireland, a strategy successfully deployed for the last decade by Aldi and Lidl in Ireland.

The UK government said it was postponing checks on British borders because of the pandemic and global supply chain issues. But border posts were not ready and work has not yet started at either Dover in England or Holyhead in Wales, the two main gateways into the UK.

The UK recently chose a site for its border-control post at Parc Cybi in Holyhead in Anglesey, but on Monday it was clear work had not yet started.

0 Replies
 
Builder
 
  0  
Reply Thu 23 Sep, 2021 07:15 pm
https://www.express.co.uk/life-style/cars/1495525/mini-moke-car-production-brexit-news-latest
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 24 Sep, 2021 06:01 am
Continent’s press liken situation to 1970s Winter of Discontent and ‘boycotted Cuba’

‘The kingdom of empty shelves’: European newspapers blame Brexit for UK supply chain crisis
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Sat 25 Sep, 2021 04:13 am
The EU’s chief negotiator found his UK counterparts bizarrely unfocused during the long haul to fix a Brexit deal – and believes they still don’t know what they’ve done.

My Secret Brexit Diary by Michel Barnier review – a British roasting
Quote:
Rarely do we see thinking of the other side of a negotiation so quickly, while the trail is still warm. Michel Barnier’s new book helps explain why Britain ended up being comprehensively out-negotiated over Brexit and saddled with a flawed withdrawal agreement and a deeply disadvantageous future relationship, both of which will cause us major problems for decades to come. This is therefore an important account.

That said, Barnier may be an excellent haute fonctionnaire, but judging by the stilted prose of this “secret diary” he is definitely not an author. We learn little about the newly declared French presidential candidate other than that he admires General De Gaulle. There are no startling revelations and there is more technical detail – much more – than most people will want. Nor does this read like a genuinely contemporaneous diary; a giveaway is that he too often knows the future, writing, for example, that: “I will have Martin Selmayr on the line several times over the next few days.”

Nevertheless, five basic reasons for the EU’s success and the UK’s failure jump out of these pages, which, as a result, contain valuable lessons.

First, the EU side was professional and properly prepared, whereas the UK was not. Barnier was across the detail at every stage, and even read Stanley Johnson’s 1987 novel The Commissioner to try to understand his son. He focused from the beginning on the landing zone for the negotiation and prepared a full legal text of the free trade agreement before the talks began. When negotiations opened, the media made much of a photo of Barnier sitting with a file full of papers on the table in front of him while David Davis had nothing at all. The reality was far worse. Barnier was astounded by Davis’s “nonchalant” approach: “As is always the case with him we rarely get into the substance of things,” he writes about one subsequent encounter.

Second, Barnier says it was the unity of the 27, “so unexpected for the British, that forced them to finally agree to pay their full share”. The British side repeatedly tried to negotiate with individual member states rather than the Commission, but kept being sent back to Barnier. Even at the last moment, Boris Johnson tried to phone Angela Merkel and Emmanuel Macron, but both leaders refused to take his call. Barnier spends a vast amount of his time keeping member states on side, travelling endlessly to capitals and engaging with ministers. He saw off repeated British attempts to negotiate directly with the cabinet of the president of the commission, and Barnier reserves a special place in hell for the notorious Selmayr, Jean-Claude Juncker’s chief of staff, acidly commenting: “It is just a pity that he has difficulty in accepting the limits of his role.”

Third, the EU knew what it wanted and stuck to it. The British government spent a year negotiating rancorously and publicly with itself, which allowed the EU to take the initiative, set the agenda and frame the negotiations as it wished. It decided from the beginning that it would separate the divorce agreement from discussions on the future relationship, so the British could not use paying the leaving bill to buy access to parts of the single market. Britain tilted hopelessly at trying to change that sequence and tied its hands early on by setting out its red lines. Listening to Theresa May’s Lancaster House speech, Barnier marvelled at “the sheer number of doors she is closing here! Has she thought it through?” The EU watched with amusement and horror as the British tore themselves apart. Barnier writes of May that “this is not really a negotiation with the EU but a far more intense negotiation, on an almost hourly basis, with her own ministers and her own majority”.

The fourth reason for British failure was that Johnson made the disastrous tactical decision to try to provoke the EU in the hope it would be shaken, even briefing it as “the mad man strategy”. Barnier spotted this straight away. In the face of “threats and unpredictability” he decided to remain “calm, confident and solid” and just keep going. The British approach backfired spectacularly. In October 2020, David Frost cancelled negotiations and refused to resume them unless the EU publicly changed its position and recognised UK “sovereignty”. A week later he had to humiliatingly crawl back to the table. Most disastrously, the threat of a no deal fell flat. Barnier comments: “The British want us to believe that they are not afraid of a no deal”; they are playing a “game of chicken” and the EU task is to “keep our cool”. When the British resorted to reneging on what they had just agreed in the Northern Ireland Protocol and breaking international law with the Internal Market Bill, far from forcing the EU into concessions, they destroyed the little trust that still existed.

Finally, the EU used deadlines effectively to get its way, whereas the UK walked into a series of traps. May unnecessarily triggered Article 50, which started a two-year stopwatch, without a clear vision of what she wanted. When Davis tried to hurry Barnier up, his response was that “[Davis] is mistaken. We have time on our side”. Barnier may be unreasonably proud of his catchphrase – “the clock is ticking” – adopted right from the beginning, but he is right that the British set a time limit that worked against themselves.

Sadly, Northern Ireland became collateral damage in this farrago. From the beginning Barnier saw that the “Irish question is the stumbling block”. May and her chief official, Olly Robbins, tried hard to protect the Good Friday Agreement with an increasingly Heath Robinson-esque structure by which the whole UK remained in the Customs Union. But Johnson never took Northern Ireland seriously, proposing fictional technological solutions for the border. At one stage, Barnier had to tell a group of European Research Group MPs that the health of cows could not be assessed by drone. It is clear from Barnier’s account that Johnson knew absolutely what he was agreeing to when he signed up to a border in the Irish Sea. And Barnier was appalled when Johnson told the press shortly after that there would be no controls on goods between Britain and Northern Ireland – “which is not what the withdrawal agreement says”.

The fact is, the die was cast from the beginning. The EU set the framework and the UK was unable to escape. As Barnier writes: “I still think it is insane that a great country like the UK is conducting such a negotiation and taking such a decision … without having any clear vision of it or a majority to support it.” His conclusion, with which I agree, is that: “There is most definitely something wrong with the British system … every passing day shows that they have not realised the consequences of what is truly at stake here.” There ought to a be an inquiry into why, when we pride ourselves on our diplomatic prowess, we were so comprehensively defeated at the negotiation table, but this diary is probably the closest we will get.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Sep, 2021 07:55 am
Anyone staying illegally in Great Britain as an EU citizen will be deported, warns the responsible Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Immigration and Future Borders Foster.
It should be noted that the government has long been thinking about easing the restrictions because of the crisis in the supply of skilled workers. And it is understood that up to 5,000 temporary visas will be granted for HGV drivers.

La Republica (in English): UK immigration minister: EU citizens who have been refused to stay should take steps to leave now, or will be removed
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Sep, 2021 09:58 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter Hinteler wrote:
And it is understood that up to 5,000 temporary visas will be granted for HGV drivers.
Due to supply problems with food and petrol in Great Britain, the government has exceptionally approved 10,500 work visas for foreign specialists.
This is to bring 5,000 lorry drivers and 5,500 poultry processing specialists into the country, as the Department for Transport in London announced last night.
The transitional arrangement is intended to allow them to work in Britain until Christmas Eve. The government hopes the move will help restock supermarket shelves and toy shops before the festive season.

The UK has a shortage of around 100,000 truck drivers, according to the Road Haulage Association.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Sep, 2021 10:47 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Quote:
However, even as the plans were formally announced, Marco Digioia, the head of the European Road Haulers Association which represents more than 200,000 trucking companies across the continent, told the Observer that “much more would be needed” than a temporary relaxation of immigration rules. “There is a driver shortage across Europe,” he said. “I am not sure how many would want to go to the UK.”

Andrew Opie, from the British Retail Consortium, said the 5,000 limit would “do little to alleviate the current shortfall”.

The criticisms emerged as the supply-chain crisis spread:

• Ambulance and care workers have been affected by queues for petrol, following reports that some forecourts have not received expected petrol deliveries.

• There were warnings that as many as one in five deliveries may not be reaching major supermarket chains on time or at all.

• Polling suggested that a majority of voters, including 52% of Leave voters, believed Brexit was partly to blame for the crisis.

Digioia said European driver salaries were generally higher than in Britain; new EU rules had improved working conditions; and billions of euros had been offered to fund parking areas and support companies.
The Guardian/Observer
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sun 26 Sep, 2021 11:35 am
@Walter Hinteler,
When I drove to Frome I passed one petrol station with long queues out on the road, four petrol stations with queues in the forecourt, one garage with no diesel, and another with no fuel at all.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Tue 28 Sep, 2021 10:36 pm
UK government has granted licences for only 12 French vessels out of a total of 47 applications

Three-quarters of small French boats may be denied fishing in UK waters
Quote:
Three-quarters of small French fishing boats could be denied access to British waters under a post-Brexit regime in a move that risks further damaging Anglo-French relations.

The UK government had granted only 12 out of a total of 47 applications for licences for the French vessels under 12 metres long to fish the UK’s inshore waters.

Responding to the government’s announcement on Tuesday night,
France’s maritime minister, Annick Girardin, condemned the decision. “It’s a new refusal by the British to implement the conditions of the Brexit agreement despite all the work we have done together,” she said in a statement. “French fishing should not be taken hostage by the British for political ends.”

France was reportedly waiting for responses to requests for fishing licences in the Channel Islands, where 168 were due from Guernsey and 169 from Jersey, which is expected to make a statement on Wednesday.

France’s Europe minister, Clément Beaune, had told a French parliamentary hearing last week: “We are at the end of our patience. We are continuing our fight.” He accused the UK of being “unsportsmanlike” in its handling of the licence requests.

France and Britain had seen diplomatic tensions rise over the summer due to the number of small vessels carrying migrants crossing over the Channel.

Boris Johnson, the UK prime minister, and the French president, Emmanuel Macron, had also publicly disagreed over the UK’s decision to sign up to the Aukus defence pact, which cost France a submarine contract worth billions of dollars.

In May, France’s response to post-Brexit fishing restrictions around the island of Jersey was described as “pretty close to an act of war” by fishing community leaders in St Helier.

They said they have been told 100 boats were being lined up in France on 6 May for a 6am blockade at the main Channel Island port, threatening food and energy supplies.

A UK government spokesperson said: “Our approach has been reasonable and fully in line with our commitments in the trade and cooperation agreement.”
 

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