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What is the BEST book ever?

 
 
Mandso
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Feb, 2006 02:18 am
i agree - Lord of the Rings was seriously good
but the whole 'elves love singing every five seconds' thing was seriously unattractive
i am addicted to books by Georgette Heyer, like Beauvallet
They are sooo good
(but too much about the clothing, though)
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Wisp
 
  1  
Reply Fri 3 Mar, 2006 09:47 pm
I like fantasy, sci-fi, and action books. My favorite book is Shade's Children by Garth Nix. It is definitely the best book I have read, with a great plot that makes you think.
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atypical10
 
  1  
Reply Sat 25 Mar, 2006 09:38 am
Books by Nicholas Sparks.
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Shinobi
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 12:20 pm
The Sound and the Fury - Faulkner
Siddharta and Steppenwolf - H. Hesse (haven't yet red Glassperlenspiel)
Asimov's Foundation series
A. Clarke
Tolkien's Lord of the Rings and Hobbit
Crime and Punishment



And the most influencing for me:
Dune series by Frank Herbert (in my oppinion the "deepest" SF novels ever written)
Also sprach Zarathustra by F. Nietzsche
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tin sword arthur
 
  1  
Reply Tue 13 Jun, 2006 12:26 pm
The Pentacle Queen wrote:
Easy. Lord of the rings.
What other book has about 5 made up languages and a whole 2000 year history?

What more needs to be said?
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Amigo
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jan, 2007 01:47 am
Re: What is the BEST book ever?
CarbonSystem wrote:
What is the best book ever and what are your favorite authours ever?


George Orwell

Kurt Vonnegut

Stienbeck

Voltaire- Candide
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Lord Ellpus
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jan, 2007 02:05 am
Re: What is the BEST book ever?
Amigo wrote:
CarbonSystem wrote:
What is the best book ever and what are your favorite authours ever?


Kurt Vonnegut............


Him be good!

"Welcome to the Monkey House" sticks in my mind, for two reasons...

1. The guy who lives on one side of Central Park and has to cross the park at night in order to visit his aged mother, who always seems to have some emergency going on. He is forever being mugged by the same gang so, to prevent future delays in getting across to Mum, he negotiates a deal with the leader of the muggers (a thug by the name of Motherf***er) which results in him setting up a standing order for money to be transferred into MoFo's account each week.
Hilarious.

2. The story about equality, which featured ballerinas having lead weights tied to their ankles to prevent them jumping higher than any of their ballerina colleagues.

Vonnegut would've made a great scriptwriter for Monty Python. Years ahead of his time, IMO.
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Amigo
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jan, 2007 02:25 am
Monty python lending credit to Vonnegut......

Now thats a compliment coming from an English man. Laughing
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Amigo
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jan, 2007 02:42 am
http://free.art.pl/bukowski/fot_buk03.jpg

"You begin saving the world by saving one person at a time; all else is grandiose romanticism or politics."
Charles Bukowski

"There is a time to stop reading, there is a time to STOP trying to WRITE, there is a time to kick the whole bloated sensation of ART out on its whore-ass."
Charles Bukowski

"Well, people got attatched. Once you cut the umbilical cord they attatched to the other things. Sight, sound, sex, money, mirages, mothers, masturbation, murder, and Monday morning hangovers."
- Charles Bukowski
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dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jan, 2007 04:05 am
pretty hard to narrow it down.

Monsieur le Comte de Monte Cristo: Alexander Dumas.

The Time Travellers Wife. Audrey Niffenegger

Crossstitch: Diana Gabaldon
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Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jan, 2007 04:07 am
First, I gotta say that I see favorite and best as two different things. Favorites may be good, but I love them because speak to me in a personal or special way. Best has a whole different set of criteria.

Two Best:

Crime and Punishment, Dostoevsky
Light in August, Faulkner

Favorites:

To Kill a Mockingbird, Lee
A Tree Grows in Brooklyn, Smith
Crime and Punishment (this made both lists)
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dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 4 Jan, 2007 04:12 am
Xavier Herbert: Poor Fella My Country

Writer Xavier Herbert was an often-offensive yet heroic figure in Australian literary history. His epic, Poor Fellow My Country, is the longest novel ever published in any European language. Its theme is the one that preoccupied Herbert throughout his life - the impact of the white man and development on the indigenous population.
Xavier Herbert was a man of contradictions; from the 1930s he was a visionary defender of indigenous rights who enjoyed talking like a racist. He liked to offend people.
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Slomichizza
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2007 08:54 pm
My favorite non-literature book is Syrup by Maxx Barry. It's not a deep book but it's probably the most fun I've ever had reading.
Literature-wise, I found Don Quixote to be my favorite, but I'm only 17 and I have a lot more to read before I can give a really worthy opinion.
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Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Jan, 2007 10:33 pm
Slomichizza wrote:
My favorite non-literature book is Syrup by Maxx Barry. It's not a deep book but it's probably the most fun I've ever had reading.
Literature-wise, I found Don Quixote to be my favorite, but I'm only 17 and I have a lot more to read before I can give a really worthy opinion.


I envy you what lies before you, Slomichizza. I saved a few books to read for when I retire. That gives me something to look forward to.

BTW, I read Don Quixote in Spanish and in English. Though the Spanish was a bit of a struggle, I loved it in two languages.
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georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jan, 2007 02:19 pm
Roberta wrote:
First, I gotta say that I see favorite and best as two different things. Favorites may be good, but I love them because speak to me in a personal or special way. Best has a whole different set of criteria.


A very good distinction, I think.

I too would put Crime and Punishment at the top of the "Best" list. (Who can forget the last paragraph in that work?) Along with that I would put a few of Dostoyveski's shorter Works, including "White Nights" and "A Gentle Spirit". I much prefer the older Constance Garnet translations of Dostoyevski's work.

Among my favorites are Maupassant's Short Stories and the poems of Robert W. Service, WB Yeats, and a few others.
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Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jan, 2007 04:51 pm
georgeob1 wrote:


I too would put Crime and Punishment at the top of the "Best" list. (Who can forget the last paragraph in that work?) Along with that I would put a few of Dostoyveski's shorter Works, including "White Nights" and "A Gentle Spirit". I much prefer the older Constance Garnet translations of Dostoyevski's work.

Among my favorites are Maupassant's Short Stories and the poems of Robert W. Service, WB Yeats, and a few others.


I actually studied Russian for the express purpose of being able to read Dostoevsky in his original language. Couldn't hack it.

When it comes to short stories, Georgeob1, you've chosen the master.
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georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jan, 2007 04:57 pm
Roberta wrote:


I actually studied Russian for the express purpose of being able to read Dostoevsky in his original language. Couldn't hack it.

When it comes to short stories, Georgeob1, you've chosen the master.


That's more than I have done so I'll be respectfully silent. What is your opinion of a comparison of the old Constance Garnet translations of Dostoyevski with the newer ones?

I really liked your distinction between 'best' and 'favorite'. Another pair would be "The Red and the Black" (Stendahl) as a 'best' and Pere Goriot (Balzac) as a 'favorite'.
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Roberta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Jan, 2007 05:26 pm
georgeob1 wrote:
Roberta wrote:


I actually studied Russian for the express purpose of being able to read Dostoevsky in his original language. Couldn't hack it.

When it comes to short stories, Georgeob1, you've chosen the master.


That's more than I have done so I'll be respectfully silent. What is your opinion of a comparison of the old Constance Garnet translations of Dostoyevski with the newer ones?

I really liked your distinction between 'best' and 'favorite'. Another pair would be "The Red and the Black" (Stendahl) as a 'best' and Pere Goriot (Balzac) as a 'favorite'.


Now you've got me, George. Just did a quick check of the Dostoevsky works on my shelves (the ones I could find), and Garnet was not the translator of any of them. So I read them all without having the best translator and was still overwhelmed. Do you know whether any editions of Garnets translations are still in print?

I agree with you about the Red and the Black. A great work, but not one that touched me in a powerful emotional way to make it a favorite. On the other hand, I could see where Pere Goriot could be a favorite, although it's not one of mine. Entirely different connection with the reader.

On the whole I'm not a big fan of French literature. I made that assessment a number of years ago. It may be time to revisit. I'll see if Pere Goriot is on my shelves. If it is, I may give it another read.

On another thread about books Dyslexia made the point that we go through phases at different ages and times in our lives. He went through an Ayn Rand phase at an early age and moved on. (I never admired Rand, but that's beside the point.) I've found this to be true. Went through my Herman Hesse phase. So, as I said, maybe it's time for me to revisit some French writers.
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georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2007 12:28 am
While I think you are correct that we do go through phases in our lives when first one and them the other work or author attracts our fascination, I also believe that there are other works of literature that arre phase independent -- they can be read again and again at different points in our lives, and each time have great impact and meaning, perhaps a bit different at each phase, but substantial nonetheless.

Hemmingway, Dos Passos, Ayn Rand, Faulkner (perhaps) and others are very tied to certain phases. However Crime & Punishment; Brothers karamazov;War and Peace; A Hero of our Time; The Red and the Black; Don Quixote; much of Shakespeare; Budenbrooks; plays like The Iceman Cometh and Lomng Day's Journey into Night; some of the Greek classics and others can be read again and again with new and fresh appreciation every time.\

What is more ridiculous today than Hemmingway's contrived and postured attempts to portray the "unique" qualities of Spaniards than the stilted "literal" tranliterations of Spanish phrases in "For Whom The Bell Tolls"? From el Sordo's musings that the hill on which he and his men were trapped by the nationalist forces was shaped like a chankre to Pilar's question to Maria ("little rabbit"), "Did the Earth Move?" after her night on the mountain with Robert Jordan in a sleeping bag. Same goes for "Fountainhead (though if you want to read something truely interesting by her try "We the Living").

I first read Crime and Punishment as a 16 year old in high school. It was no less magical and moving when I reread it 40 years later. Same goes for "The Red and the Black", "War and Peace" , "a Hero of our Time", and the rest.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Jan, 2007 12:49 am
I'll show you two who I am, and give you fodder for dismissal. I liked d'maupaussant's stories, read now almost fifty years ago, and remember nothing except liking them, almost remember the book.

But... I'll claim that however we process what we read and for however long, it gets interwoven into ourselves. Sometimes for some silly phrase, and sometimes for a keen idea - whether or not that idea's source is remembered twenty years later. Sometimes the keen ideas just agree with already held ideas. That's good too, additive.

Await the challenging thought; in my case it is usually from myself. Keeps one blinking..
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