6
   

What is the BEST book ever?

 
 
William1987
 
  1  
Reply Tue 30 Nov, 2004 09:49 pm
Can't forget Huckleberry Finn.

I always like anything by T.H. White.
0 Replies
 
askchester
 
  1  
Reply Mon 6 Dec, 2004 10:36 pm
anything by herman hesse and roald dahl
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CarbonSystem
 
  1  
Reply Tue 7 Dec, 2004 02:40 pm
I'm starting Huck Finn today. I already think it's very funny and humorous.
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TethrynII
 
  1  
Reply Wed 15 Dec, 2004 09:43 pm
Salvatore
Anything written by R A Salvatore is godly. He even wrote a series about a cleric and two dwarven cooks, and it was amazing.
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Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jan, 2005 02:31 pm
Well I haven't read everything yet, but I do have favorites:

The Good Earth by Pearl S. Buck
Nana by E. Zola
Cousin Bette by Balzac
Gone With The Wind - by M. Mitchell
Girl With A Pearl Earring - Tracy Chevalier (sp?)

I have never been able to finish anything by James Joyce.
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Francis
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jan, 2005 02:40 pm
Nice choice, Green Witch

But,

Quote:
I have never been able to finish anything by James Joyce


That would be such an odyssey!
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CarbonSystem
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jan, 2005 06:19 pm
The Good Earth? I'm not sure if I liked that one as much, what part did you like the most? I liked the idea behind the whole thing, but sometimes I had trouble keeping interested.
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mosheb
 
  1  
Reply Sun 2 Jan, 2005 06:22 pm
I really tried to think of something but I have not been reding fiction for so long that i can't remember what i really liked anymore...
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Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Jan, 2005 09:10 am
Yup, The Good Earth is one of those love it or leave it books. I have a thing for pre- Communist China so that helped, plus I do small scale farming so I could relate on that level. IMHO it's the only Pearl S. Buck book worth reading.

I should add to my list "The Grapes of Wrath" by Steinbeck.

I also keep a notebook of what I read and make a few notations as to what I thought about a book (I've been doing this since the 4th grade after a teacher suggested it). Every year or so I go back through my notebooks and chose a favorite to re-read. Sometimes my opinion will change based on more life experience or just having read a similar book that was better crafted.
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JamesMac
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Jan, 2005 11:52 am
JOHN 1:12 by Arnold English. I was engulfed by this book!
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CarbonSystem
 
  1  
Reply Mon 3 Jan, 2005 02:07 pm
Sounds good to me!
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revengeofthecow
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Jan, 2005 09:23 pm
One of three. "Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger, "1984" by George Orwell (scary, scary novel), or "Lamb: The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal". Hilarious, yet poignant and relevant.
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sanz
 
  1  
Reply Fri 7 Jan, 2005 11:33 am
My favourite book is Not Without My Daughter by Betty Mahmoody. It is a true story and is one of the most heart-felt novels I've ever read
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rmrrose820
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Jan, 2005 05:29 pm
I'm conflicted. There are 3 books which are competing for my vote, "Pride and Prejudice", "The Fountainhead", and "Anna Karenina". I suppose I would vote for "Anna Karenina" though because it examines so much about the world. There are so many themes in it, marriage, suicide, love, parenthood, society, family, etc.
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Jan, 2005 05:39 pm
There are many wonderful choices already named. Others to consider would be Faust, Tropic of Capricorn, more than one Shakespeare, Moby Dick, The Grapes of Wrath.

Some named I don't like are the ones by Ayn Rand and Don Quixote.
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rmrrose820
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Jan, 2005 05:58 pm
Why don't you like Ayn Rand edgarblythe?
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Jan, 2005 06:00 pm
Poorly written, taken literally by many readers.
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rmrrose820
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Jan, 2005 06:18 pm
Literally how? I know that the major thing that bothered me about "The Fountainhead" was that at times it seemed like little more than a vehicle for her philosophy. I enjoyed it over all but there were moments when I felt like she was trying to impose objectivism upon the reader.
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edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 9 Jan, 2005 06:31 pm
Literally by thinking the book message is somehow to be taken seriously.
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Olorin
 
  1  
Reply Fri 14 Jan, 2005 07:36 am
Lord of The rings - JRR Tolkien and also the silmarillion.

I was reading this when i was in NZ. it totally blew my mind...the depiction of the lands of Mid-Earth and its history..was totally astounding....i was totally transported every time i flip the pages.

well..gonna strt on Crime & Punishment next.
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