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Failed to find this "Greek" symbol-How to pronounce it?

 
 
Reply Sun 13 Dec, 2015 12:05 am
See the second symbol in the equation below which is like θ with an open on its up-left corner.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/math/0/2/8/028d4440f791c4175ea3faf5f8dfd2b7.png

How to pronounce it?
I've failed to find it out in Greek alphabet:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sigma
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 921 • Replies: 18
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View best answer, chosen by oristarA
Kolyo
  Selected Answer
 
  2  
Reply Sun 13 Dec, 2015 12:16 am
@oristarA,
I don't know whether that's even Greek, but it's somebody's version of a 'd'. It's part of a larger symbol meaning "partial derivative with respect to t".
FBM
 
  2  
Reply Sun 13 Dec, 2015 12:22 am
@oristarA,
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/%E2%88%82
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Dec, 2015 12:22 am
@Kolyo,
Kolyo wrote:

I don't know whether that's even Greek, but it's somebody's version of a 'd'. It's part of a larger symbol meaning "partial derivative with respect to t".


Thanks.
How to pronounce H with a bent bar over its head?
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Dec, 2015 12:30 am
@FBM,


Excellent.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Dec, 2015 01:02 am
@FBM,
How to pronounce parenthesis:
Is (r,t) read as "parenthesis r, comma, t, parenthesis"?
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Dec, 2015 01:02 am
@FBM,
How to pronounce parenthesis:
Is (r,t) read as "parenthesis r, comma, t, parenthesis"?
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Dec, 2015 01:08 am
@oristarA,
It's been years since I sat through a calculus class, but if memory serves, it's "of r t."
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Dec, 2015 01:14 am
Brandon9000
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Dec, 2015 05:19 pm
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:

Kolyo wrote:

I don't know whether that's even Greek, but it's somebody's version of a 'd'. It's part of a larger symbol meaning "partial derivative with respect to t".


Thanks.
How to pronounce H with a bent bar over its head?

It is read: h bar
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Dec, 2015 02:29 am
@Brandon9000,
Brandon9000 wrote:

oristarA wrote:

Kolyo wrote:

I don't know whether that's even Greek, but it's somebody's version of a 'd'. It's part of a larger symbol meaning "partial derivative with respect to t".


Thanks.
How to pronounce H with a bent bar over its head?

It is read: h bar


Really? Will such reading be confused with Planck Constant h bar?:
https://upload.wikimedia.org/math/b/6/c/b6c60acb37a0cf22ef6c3b8d58a469da.png
https://upload.wikimedia.org/math/0/2/8/028d4440f791c4175ea3faf5f8dfd2b7.png

The second sign is h bar in the above two equations.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Dec, 2015 02:34 am
@oristarA,
How to read the equation?
https://upload.wikimedia.org/math/0/2/8/028d4440f791c4175ea3faf5f8dfd2b7.png

i multiplied by h bar multiplied by d over dt multiplied by parenthesis r comma t parenthesis equals to H bar multiplied by psi parenthesis r comma t parenthesis?

The grammar is confusing. But how to improve it?
0 Replies
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Dec, 2015 02:38 am
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:

Kolyo wrote:

I don't know whether that's even Greek, but it's somebody's version of a 'd'. It's part of a larger symbol meaning "partial derivative with respect to t".


Thanks.
How to pronounce H with a bent bar over its head?


I think it's "caret H," but I'm not really sure.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Dec, 2015 02:51 am
@FBM,
FBM wrote:

oristarA wrote:

Kolyo wrote:

I don't know whether that's even Greek, but it's somebody's version of a 'd'. It's part of a larger symbol meaning "partial derivative with respect to t".


Thanks.
How to pronounce H with a bent bar over its head?


I think it's "caret H," but I'm not really sure.


"caret H" sounds more reasonable. I'd better adopt it before someone offers an official pronunciation.
Kolyo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Dec, 2015 11:58 am
@Brandon9000,
He means the capital H with the hat.
0 Replies
 
Kolyo
 
  2  
Reply Mon 14 Dec, 2015 12:01 pm
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:

"caret H" sounds more reasonable. I'd better adopt it before someone offers an official pronunciation.


For now, say "H-hat", which is better than "caret H".

I think it represents the Hamilton operator, but I don't know much about it.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamiltonian_%28quantum_mechanics%29
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Dec, 2015 08:25 pm
@Kolyo,

Cool!

Who would like to answer the following question?

oristarA wrote:

How to read the equation?
https://upload.wikimedia.org/math/0/2/8/028d4440f791c4175ea3faf5f8dfd2b7.png

i multiplied by h bar multiplied by d over dt multiplied by parenthesis r comma t parenthesis equals to H bar multiplied by psi parenthesis r comma t parenthesis?

The grammar is confusing. But how to improve it?
Kolyo
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Dec, 2015 10:05 pm
@FBM,
Yahoo, Cauchy-Riemann equations! That was Calculus 5 at my school. Smile
0 Replies
 
Kolyo
 
  2  
Reply Mon 14 Dec, 2015 10:17 pm
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:

How to read the equation?
https://upload.wikimedia.org/math/0/2/8/028d4440f791c4175ea3faf5f8dfd2b7.png


Well, I dropped out of my only quantum mechanics class, so don't quote me on this...

--> i h-bar times the partial derivative of the wave function with respect to time, equals the Hamiltonian of the wave function

Here, "psi of r and t" is the wave function. At least I think it is. You can double check what psi is at that Wikipedia page on the Hamiltonian I linked to. Or you can google schrodinger's equation.
0 Replies
 
 

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