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Are there any science careers for people who hate math

 
 
aja2015
 
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 08:20 am
I am considering a career in science, but I'm driven away by the maths. I wonder if there are any scientific fields for people with a strong aversion to math.
 
maxdancona
 
  2  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 08:31 am
@aja2015,
Science is based heavily on math, so you are going to have trouble in any field without a firm grasp of math. I don't think it is possible to get a scientific college degree of any sort without studying at least calculus.

There are probably some fields that are less math-driven day to day than others. I went into physics which is very math intensive. I am guessing that fields such as biology use less math day to day, but I can't imagine you could do any real job in science without a in depth understanding of calculus and statistics.

I wonder if there is some way for you and math to make friends. I taught science for a while and noticed that students in school are taught the more mundane parts of math (which are important) but miss the incredibly rich language of math (which is what scientists use day to day).
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 10:40 am
@aja2015,
aja2015 wrote:
I wonder if there are any scientific fields for people with a strong aversion to math.

Not really. Even Paleontology and Zoology are going to need math skills once you get done with the field work.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 11:32 am
@aja2015,
A couple of the best geophysicists I know are terrible at math but they are very creative in conceptualizing the phenoms they want to measure. They have access to a computing team that sets up the software. (Most advanced math solutions, because computers are so easy to handle, use linear algebraic solutions instead of calc 'the ole fashioned way")

I took lots of advanced math in both areas , chem and geo, but nowadays, most of it I forgot since we use linear programs
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 11:49 am
@aja2015,
What science courses interest you?
0 Replies
 
Germlat
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 11:55 am
I don't think math and science can be alienated from one another....
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 12:04 pm
@maxdancona,
Quote:
you are going to have trouble in any field without a firm grasp of math
Not quite sure Max. Both I and my No. 1 Son quit math for the more general curricula, yet we both satisfied tech jobs of tough requirement
0 Replies
 
aja2015
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 07:38 pm
@farmerman,
I never thought anyone working in a physics related field could be terrible at math. They certainly are a rare breed. But, anyway, aside from working with a "computing team", how else do they compensate for their weakness in mathematics?
aja2015
 
  1  
Reply Tue 11 Nov, 2014 07:41 pm
@farmerman,
-how else do they compensate for their weakness in mathematics?
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Wed 12 Nov, 2014 04:37 am
@aja2015,
s I said, they have very good skills in conceptualizing . Coneptualizing is like being an artist an able to produce realistic versions of how a model's arm is "shrunk": (foreshortened), when viewed strait on.
Developing a "conceptual model" of what we want to do is important to any project. Such a model relies less upon advanced math than it does on the ability to perceive .
How are your math skills in such things as algebra?.

Certain math skills come to one as one uses it over and over.

0 Replies
 
StephenBotsford
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2015 06:26 am
There are many who just hate maths, there are many fields in science and other subject also, in which one can build career. I just suggest you some careers for people who just hate mathematics, the name of this career are:-
Inspector of equipments
Public Relations Specialist
Writer and Author
Broadcast News Analyst
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Mon 12 Jan, 2015 08:34 am
@aja2015,
Do you simply not like math or is it because you are not good at math? You will need to have an understanding of math -- you might (depending on the science area you pursue) not need to be an expert in math.

Like noted here -- the more advanced math will be actually calculated via a computer. You will need to understand the results though.

I, for example, majored in economics. It too is heavily involved in math and stats. The advanced math I was required to take in graduate school was very difficult for me. And I loved math. But once we started getting involved in the very advanced math, I just managed to squeeze through and pass. I was able though in the advanced economics course to use computer programs for various stats, etc. and interpret the results. So the overall understanding is important but perhaps not actually calculating out these huge complex equations.
0 Replies
 
 

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