1
   

Does "I went up" refer to "I went to college"?

 
 
Thu 30 Jul, 2015 06:22 am

Context:

The lowering of the age of majority to eighteen and the sexual revolution of the 1960s changed everything, but that was after I attended Oxford.
AT THAT time, the physics course was arranged in a way that made it particularly easy to avoid work. I did one exam before I went up, then had three years at Oxford with just the final exam at the end.
  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Question • Score: 1 • Views: 1,135 • Replies: 14
Topic Closed

 
View best answer, chosen by oristarA
McTag
  Selected Answer
 
  2  
Thu 30 Jul, 2015 11:15 am
@oristarA,

Yes. To university, since it's apparently a British text.

In England (not so in Scotland, in my experience) you are said to go "up" to university.
The "Oxbridge" universities are composed of many discrete and largely autonomous colleges.
oristarA
 
  1  
Thu 30 Jul, 2015 02:12 pm
@McTag,
I wonder whether Americans would understand it immediately.
ehBeth
 
  2  
Thu 30 Jul, 2015 02:15 pm
@oristarA,
It's a very British idiom.

It is not used in Canada or the US.
0 Replies
 
Tes yeux noirs
 
  4  
Thu 30 Jul, 2015 03:52 pm
Mainly Oxford or Cambridge; rather old-fashioned and upper-class.. When you go to college you "go up", and when you leave (permanently or temporarily) you "come down". If you get expelled for misconduct, you are "sent down".


oristarA
 
  1  
Thu 30 Jul, 2015 11:03 pm
@Tes yeux noirs,
Excellent.
McTag
 
  1  
Fri 31 Jul, 2015 01:44 am
@oristarA,

Read "Porterhouse Blue" for a (humorous) insight into the university colleges and their peculiarities.
selectmytutor
 
  0  
Fri 31 Jul, 2015 06:10 am
@oristarA,
Yes, Oristar it refers to "I went to college".
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Fri 31 Jul, 2015 08:41 am
@McTag,
McTag wrote:


Read "Porterhouse Blue" for a (humorous) insight into the university colleges and their peculiarities.


I searched wiki and found the introduction that said "Porterhouse Blue is a novel written by Tom Sharpe, first published in 1974."
It is rather old then. So I wonder whether there is somewhere online that offers a free PDF of it.
McTag
 
  1  
Fri 31 Jul, 2015 11:22 am
@oristarA,

I've no idea, but I found this:

http://ebookfriendly.com/sites-where-you-can-read-books-online/
ehBeth
 
  1  
Fri 31 Jul, 2015 11:25 am
@McTag,
I found a small pile of Tom Sharpe's at a thrift store recently and have been using them as transit reading. Entertaining.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Fri 31 Jul, 2015 12:21 pm
@McTag,
McTag wrote:


Looks good.
I'm reading the information there.
0 Replies
 
Zk
 
  1  
Mon 3 Aug, 2015 01:45 pm
@oristarA,
Yes it is sound like a British English to me. According to the content its right to say "I went to college" or heading to college or off to college(uni in British)
0 Replies
 
Tes yeux noirs
 
  2  
Mon 3 Aug, 2015 03:51 pm
"Uni" is just a lazy British kid's way of saying "university"; it isn't really a proper word.
Zk
 
  1  
Mon 3 Aug, 2015 05:51 pm
@Tes yeux noirs,
I got used to this word till now lol
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Does "I went up" refer to "I went to college"?
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.06 seconds on 05/06/2021 at 08:09:38