8
   

German And EU Immigration

 
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 5 Nov, 2014 12:05 pm
@saab,
In Germany, they get it from day 1 onwards, the same money like anyone else.

EU - Family benefits / - Familjeförmåner
0 Replies
 
Germlat
 
  3  
Reply Wed 5 Nov, 2014 12:16 pm
@Lordyaswas,
I don't know if you are right but... You're one of he funniest people I've ever run across.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Wed 5 Nov, 2014 03:07 pm
@Lordyaswas,
From a report in The Independent:

Quote:
He [Ukip's Nigel Farage] told a Ukip hustings: “What we have got is a massive oversupply in the labour market which has driven down wages. We have literally made this country now the cheap labour economy of the European Union."

He added that migration had benefited the rich and multinational firms because it meant “cheaper chauffeurs, cheaper gardeners and cheaper nannies”.


In the same report:
Quote:
An academic study today calculated that migrant workers from the EU had contributed far more in tax than they had claimed in benefits over a decade.

It found that immigrants who arrived since 2000 were 43 per cent less likely than UK-born workers to receive state benefits or tax credits and seven per cent less likely to live in social housing.

And it suggested the newcomers were more highly educated than the UK average.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2014 02:46 am
@Walter Hinteler,
It is rather logical that migrants worker over a decade contribute more in tax than they claim in benefits. Migrant workers are usually young and healthy and finished their education.
A "native"person got child benefits until 18? then benefits to study, money for sickleave, for being unable to work, when retire the list is long.
It is a pro migrant statistic. One should compare a migrant worker and a "native " worker with the same job and living conditions.
I would guess that as a rule the migrant worker is better educated than the average "native"worker. But how about the migrant worker and the average worker in his own country?

Does this statistic work the other way too? A British migrant worker is better educated than the average native worker ?
I think it does. It is not the education but often the personality which makes a person seek a future in another country -they are probably more open for new ideas, have to learn a new language, new rules about how to behave, what to eat etc etc.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2014 03:33 am
@saab,
saab wrote:
It is rather logical that migrants worker over a decade contribute more in tax than they claim in benefits. Migrant workers are usually young and healthy and finished their education.
Yes. And that's what Cameron, many from the Conservative Party and Ukip don't see.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2014 03:39 am
@saab,
saab wrote:

A "native"person got child benefits until 18? then benefits to study, money for sickleave, for being unable to work, when retire the list is long.
It is a pro migrant statistic. One should compare a migrant worker and a "native " worker with the same job and living conditions.
I don't think that you can add "benefits to study" here, especially since who gets them in the UK?

Your other points .... well, you really should ask for those data. Would create new jobs in the statistic offices, at least.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2014 03:41 am
@saab,
saab wrote:
But how about the migrant worker and the average worker in his own country?
You perhaps find the answer in the statistics from those countries.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2014 03:42 am
@saab,
saab wrote:
Does this statistic work the other way too? A British migrant worker is better educated than the average native worker ?
I think it does.
Well, I don't have the data to agree or disagree. Perhapsyou've got a source why you think so.
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  2  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2014 06:02 am
@FredWen,
Basically Cameron is losing votes to the rabid anti-EU party UKIP. So he's trying to look tough, and failing.

Quote:
Immigrants from the 10 countries that joined the EU in 2004 contributed more to the UK than they took out in benefits, according to a new study.

They added £4.96bn more in taxes in the years to 2011 than they took out in public services, the report produced by University College London (UCL) found.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-29910497

We've had waves of immigration since the 1950s, but they've mostly been to cities. People living in the leafy shires who vote Conservative have been unaffected. Now East Europeans are moving into areas where David Cameron's voters live and he's running scared.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 6 Nov, 2014 08:18 am
@izzythepush,
izzythepush wrote:
We've had waves of immigration since the 1950s, but they've mostly been to cities. People living in the leafy shires who vote Conservative have been unaffected. Now East Europeans are moving into areas where David Cameron's voters live and he's running scared.
From the Independent's report Don’t wave flags and embrace immigrants if you want to be truly English
Quote:

Despite the current debate surrounding immigration and national identity, England has for centuries been “nonchalant” about its "Englishness" and tolerant of other cultures, according to a major new history.

The conclusions, published tomorrow in the first single-volume history of England to be produced on this scale in almost a century, suggest that since Anglo Saxon times, the country has been reluctant to assert English nationalism. It says immigration is as much a part of the nation's psyche as “thatched cottages and cream teas”.

Renowned historian Professor Robert Tombs, who wrote The English and Their History, which delves back over the past 1,300 years, told The Independent that in recent decades “the English have largely accommodated the changes brought by moral pluralism and multi-ethnicity, incorporating them into new varieties of Englishness.
[...]
According to his new book, the rhetoric of Eurosceptics also stands in stark contrast to historical fact. Only between King Alfred and King Cnut, and then during the Tudor period (along with Wales), did England operate as an isolated political entity, he points out in his book.

Commenting on the prominence of immigration as a political issue, the historian said: “Political extremism, alienation, cynicism, xenophobia - all feed off pessimism, the idea of England in decline, drifting out of control. Our history shows us that we have been a lucky and successful country. We are not a country in decline.” The past “should remind us that our fortunes have always been made by openness to the world”.

... ... ...
0 Replies
 
permanentresidentexp
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Dec, 2014 06:23 am
@FredWen,
Unemployed immigrants will also have less access to welfare benefits and it will be more difficult for them even to claim benefits in the first place, according to the 133-page report, presented Wednesday. According to the German government, the member states are also allowed to limit the time that citizens from other EU countries can look for work.
0 Replies
 
 

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