1
   

United nations, EU, where are you??

 
 
Thok
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 Aug, 2004 01:05 am
Murder and revenge stalk Sudan's refugees

Quote:
The screaming mob first stoned the fleeing man, then they stabbed him, hacked off his ears and nose, before severing his genitals and sticking them in his mouth. It was retribution Darfur-style, in this most vicious of communal conflicts.

Medibor Ahmed Mohammed, an aid worker with the charity Care, was attacked at a refugee camp after he was accused of being a member of the Janjaweed Arab militia, and of being personally involved in murderous ethnic cleansing.

For two days after the killing of Mr Mohammed and the stabbing of three of his Arab colleagues by the African crowd, which included a large number of women, the authorities shut Kalma camp to outsiders, including aid workers.

On Sunday, soldiers and police charged in and arrested 270 people. In the process, it is claimed, they indiscriminately beat up many of the refugees, sexually assaulted women and stole money and property.

The murder of Mr Mohammed has led to an upsurge in ethnic tension and anxiety about further violence. Among those being held by police are a number of local employees of Care, and a 9pm curfew has been imposed by the United Nations and the aid agencies on their staff.

At the Mussei camp, where Mr Mohammed and his family lived among other Arab refugees, there is talk of revenge attacks on Kalma. The authorities say it is almost inevitable that there will be retaliation by Arabs against Africans. Many of Mr Mohammed's compatriots are also blaming foreigners for taking him and his fellow Arabs to the waiting mob at Kalma.

Yesterday, there were patches of dried blood where Mr Mohammed was lynched and pieces of his white shirt, stained dark crimson, stuck to barbed wire fences through which he had tried to escape. But for the inhabitants of Kalma, it was the actions of the police which were the cause of most complaints. "They said they were looking for knives, but they stole a hundred thousand Sudanese pounds [about £25] from our hut," said Mohammed Adem Ahmed. "They also took our watches and a radio. I protested, and they beat me with their sticks, and then kicked me when I fell down."



full report
0 Replies
 
Thok
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 03:38 am
Refugees live and die without shelter in the land where aid agencies fear to tread

Quote:
They were around 3ft long, laid out in a neat row; graves of babies in a patchy field. It was difficult to see how many there were; the rain had spread the mounds of red earth and scattered the wild flowers laid on top. The babies died from lack of food, lack of medicine and infected water. It happened at a place no more than three hours' drive from Nyala, the capital of south Darfur, but deemed too dangerous for the international agencies and the United Nations to venture.

There are other children buried here, as well as some elderly people, but it is the very young who have been the most vulnerable, 22 dying in the past three weeks. That is a large number from about 500 refugees living in the open with just trees for cover from the sudden torrential rains.

There are not even the most rudimentary shelters of branches and leaves one sees among the dispossessed of Darfur. These people do not want to be seen, they are too frightened of being hunted down. Most have been burnt out of their villages by the Janjaweed Arab militia and government troops, or have abandoned them in fear of impending attacks.

Unlike other refugees they have yet to make the trek to the vast camps that have sprung up in the region because the roads are not considered safe. They have been attacked by the militia, on horses and camels. The last time they tried to make the journey three men were killed.

We chanced across this group just over a fortnight ago as they attempted to melt away into the bushes. In the short intervening period their conditions have sharply deteriorated. The adults are more gaunt and scared, the eyes of the children are large and bright in painfully thin faces. Some are no longer here, Selim, a boy of seven who was ill even then, but full of curiosity about the outside world, is one of those who has died.

Hamiba Ali Abdurrahaman lost her 19-month-old daughter Ayesha four days ago. "She could not keep anything down, she was getting thinner every day, and then she started getting sick. There was nothing we could do. At the end she even stopped crying, she just stayed silent and went away."



full article
0 Replies
 
au1929
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 07:23 am
Thok

Stories such as that bring tears to ones eyes. However not to the members of the UN or the powerful of this world. While they procrastinate and debate people continue to die. Shame
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 08:55 am
Perhaps our 'allies' will unleash the International Criminal Court. That will surely stop them - as all their anti-U.S. rhetoric after our refusal to accept it implied.
0 Replies
 
au1929
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 09:35 am
George
Allies, what allies? You mean those brave and forthright nations of the EU or possibly the debating society called the UN. No, they can't be bothered they have much better things to do like condemning Israel for defending itself.
0 Replies
 
Thok
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 09:44 am
au1929 wrote:
George
Allies, what allies?


I suppose, for that reason he has it marked with a double quote.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 09:53 am
georgeob1 wrote:
Perhaps our 'allies' will unleash the International Criminal Court. That will surely stop them - as all their anti-U.S. rhetoric after our refusal to accept it implied.


Are you referring here to your allies of the Coalition Force in Iraq, in the NATO or ...


Afghanistan, Albania, Andorra. Antigua and Barbuda, Argentina, Australia, Austria, Barbados, Belgium, Belize, Benin, Bolivia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Botswana, Brazil, Bulgaria, Burkina Faso, Cambodia, Canada, Central African Republic, Colombia, Congo, Costa Rica, Croatia, Cyprus, Democratic Republic of Congo, Denmark, Djibouti, Dominica, Ecuador, Estonia, Fiji, Finland, France, Gabon, Gambia, Georgia, Germany, Ghana, Greece, Guinea, Honduras, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland,
Italy, Jordan, Latvia, Lesotho, Liechtenstein, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malawi, Mali, Malta, Marshall Islands, Mauritius, Mongolia, Namibia, Nauru, Netherlands, New Zealand, Niger, Nigeria, Norway, Panama, Paraguay, Peru, Poland, Portugal, Republic of Korea, Romania, Saint Vincent and The Grenadines, Samoa, San Marino, Senegal, Serbia and Montenegro,
Sierra Leone, Slovakia, Slovenia, South Africa, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Tajikistan, Tanzania, The Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Timor-Leste, Trinidad and Tobago, Uganda,United Kingdom, Uruguay, Venezuela, Zambia.




au1929 wrote:
George
Allies, what allies? You mean those brave and forthright nations of the EU or possibly the debating society called the UN. No, they can't be bothered they have much better things to do like condemning Israel for defending itself.


Quote:
1 : a sovereign or state associated with another by treaty or league


Ever heart of the Coalition Force or the NATO, au?
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 10:56 am
Well, I must apologize to Walter. I'm sure I get a bit tiresome for him at times with my constant and repetitive nitpicking about European hypocricy.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 11:01 am
Not at all, George, not at all: I really like your well-defined critics.

However, sometimes I don't get the point, usually due to my lack of the English language.

Like in your last but one response, where I couldn't get, which (European) countries you meant.
Obviously you are referring to all 94 countries and not only to the 26 (Western) European countries.
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 11:21 am
Thank you, Walter.

Your English is certainly better than my German. (Believe it or not I once passed a language test in German in graduate school - translation only. I knew just enough to become afraid whenever I encountered a 'das' followed by a comma -- where is the verb?! )

I am careless with my references to "Europe" and "European Powers". When the reference is bad I usually mean France and often Germany when they are aligned together. My fond hope is that Germany will turn more towards the East and independence from the French.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 11:36 am
georgeob1 wrote:
Your English is certainly better than my German. (Believe it or not I once passed a language test in German in graduate school - translation only. I knew just enough to become afraid whenever I encountered a 'das' followed by a comma -- where is the verb?! )
Quote:

Well, I'll have to pass an English test in October, since it would be too complicated to tranfer my military interpreter certificate 30 years later into a civilian one.
(Since it is the US TOPEFL test, I had to sign that I took notice that all my private data and my photo will be supplied to US law enforcement agencies - I need the test for my British university, and I'm going to do it in Germany.)


georgeob1 wrote:

I am careless with my references to "Europe" and "European Powers". When the reference is bad I usually mean France and often Germany when they are aligned together.


I know Laughing
0 Replies
 
Rick d Israeli
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 11:39 am
au1929 wrote:
No, they can't be bothered they have much better things to do like condemning Israel for defending itself.

There's no way I can get that idea out of your head? :wink:
0 Replies
 
georgeob1
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Aug, 2004 11:44 am
Walter Hinteler wrote:


I know Laughing


Damn !!
0 Replies
 
Thok
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 Aug, 2004 02:54 am
Africa: A scar on the conscience of the world

Quote:
Three years ago, Tony Blair appealed to the world to heal the wounds of Africa. As Jack Straw prepares to fly to Sudan, the continent is still riven by strife, war and famine

"The state of Africa is a scar on the conscience of the world. But if the world as a community focused on it, we could heal it. And if we don't, it will become deeper and angrier."
Tony Blair, 2 October 2001

IVORY COAST: REBELLION

What is going on? The country, which produces 40 per cent of the world's cocoa, is effectively split between north and south following a rebellion two years ago by Muslim northerners over national identity and land ownership.

What is Britain doing to help? Biirtain is taking a low profile with no direct aid. The African Union, is attempting to organize elections in October to end the standoff.

What is the solution? No signs of early resolution to stalemate

DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO: WAR

What is going on? Sporadic fighting continues despite 2002 peace agreement. Congolese Tutsi rebel soldiers occupied eastern town of Bukavu for a week in June

What is Britain doing to help? Britain backs the UN peacekeeping mission and is also pressing Uganda and Rwanda to end any involvement, which they deny

What is the solution? Conflict expected to continue

ZIMBABWE: TYRANNY/FAMINE

What is going on? Political crackdown continues ahead of elections next year

What is Britain doing to help? Britain hopes South Africa will intercede with President Mugabe to resolve standoff

What is the solution? Stalemate will only be removed when Mugabe leaves power - quietly, it is hoped

SUDAN: ETHNIC CLEANSING/FAMINE

What is going on? Rebellion in Darfur provoked government crackdown leaving 1.2 million homeless and 50,000 dead

What is Britain doing to help? Largest single cash donor having provided £63m in humanitarian aid. Backs African Union efforts and UN

What is the solution? No easy answer. Sanctions could prove disastrous

UGANDA: REBELLION/AIDS

What is going on? Mystical Lord's Resistance army has terrorised northern Uganda for years with vicious campaign that has forced 1.5 million people from their homes

What is Britain doing to help? Britain has supported President Museveni with £740m in development aid since he came to power

What is the solution? Negotiations with Sudan-based leader Joseph Kony doomed to failure, miltary solution seems inevitable

RWANDA: ETHNIC STRIFE

What is going on? Rwanda continues to deny Congolese accusations that it has its soldiers in Congo in violation of a peace agreement. Ethnic tensions in Rwanda still strong after 1994 genocide.

What is Britain doing to help? UK is largest single donor, providing nearly £33m last year. But government rejects calls to use aid to pressure President Kagame

What is the solution? Peace in Rwanda depends on solution for Congo

BURUNDI: CIVIL WAR

What is going on? 160 Tutsis were the victims last week of low level civil war

What is Britain doing to help? Britain is stepping up aid with £8m budgeted for 2004-5. UN just set up political mission

What is the solution? Solution depends on settlement in DR Congo


Link
0 Replies
 
Thok
 
  1  
Reply Sun 22 Aug, 2004 02:57 am
'You are slaves, die like slaves': Darfur refugees tell of Janjaweed killing spree

Quote:
There is little left in Silaya except burnt-out huts and a row of graves in the fields beyond, the only reminders of one of the worst atrocities of the savage conflict in Darfur.

On 30 July, three weeks after the United Nations Secretary-General, Kofi Annan, announced that he had reached agreement with the Sudanese President, Omar al-Bashir, on ending the violence, the village came under sustained and murderous attack from government troops and their Janjaweed allies. Under a UN resolution, Sudan has until the end of the month to meet a set of conditions aimed at alleviating what the UN calls "the worst humanitarian disaster in the world".

This week, the Foreign Secretary, Jack Straw, the latest international dignitary to visit the country, will tell President Bashir that his failure to disarm the Janjaweed remains the most serious unfulfilled obligation of the UN terms. However, the British government is expected to agree with Mr Annan that Khartoum has made efforts to rein in the terror unleashed on African villages and established "safe" areas, even though another 35,000 refugees, fleeing fresh attacks, are threatening to cross into neighbouring Chad. About 200,000 Sudanese are already filling camps to capacity there.

The Sudanese government, some argue, should be given more time. But the people of Silaya, in south Darfur, have a far different experience of the government. More than 100 people were killed in one raid. Most of them were shot, but 32 were tied up and burned alive. Twenty-five young women and girls were taken away; the bodies of some were found later. Also discovered were the remains of many who had fled the onslaught but were pursued and slaughtered.

Survivors say that the raiders had specific, targeted victims whom they hunted down and set alight - teachers, clerics and those who had returned after further education in the cities. In some cases, other members of the family were shot while one person was dragged off for burning.

Picking off the educated few in the rural areas is not a new practice. Influential figures in the Islamist administration and the military blame them for organising opposition to the government, and those taught in the past by foreigners are suspected of imbibing non-Muslim beliefs. Priests in African villages are particularly blamed for not using their influence to condemn the rebels.

Many of those who did manage to escape from Silaya had ended up in Muhajariya, an enclave south-east of Nyala, the capital of south Darfur, which is controlled by two rebel groups, the Sudan Liberation Army and the Justice and Equality Movement.

They are among 50,000 refugees driven into the area after government troops and their Arab militia allies burned an arc of villages around Muhajariya. The rebels, who have sparse resources and little aid coming in from the international agencies, now have to look after these dispossessed as well as their own fighters.

Commander Abdul Majid of the SLA said: "The attacks on the civilians are part of a military campaign. This war is not just against the SLA or JEM but against the people of Darfur. They are following a scorched-earth policy. They are burning the villages and driving the people into our area because, that way, they can finish off both the fighters and the civilians."

Babikir Ali, from Silaya, described how the village was attacked. "It was in the morning," he said. "We first had two helicopters which were flying very low. They fired from the air and hit some of the huts. Then we had troops in Land Cruisers, and the Janjaweed on horses and camels. They shot a lot of people before catching some others, putting them together and setting them on fire. It was a terrible, terrible thing."

"One of them was my brother," said Bahir Hashim al-Bakr. "He was a schoolteacher. When they arrested him, he was in the classroom. There were about 12 children hiding under tables and crying. They were all shot. They were looking for the educated people, the leaders we had. They're the ones who were being burned. I've heard about this happening at many places, but it is the first time I saw such a thing with my own eyes."

Yahir Ali, 33, recalled: "They were carrying matches and they set fire to people. Some others they threw back into the burning huts. They were shooting at everything and shouting 'Zurghas' [a pejorative term for blacks] and they were laughing, 'You are slaves, die like slaves'. My aunt was killed. She was an old woman and she had fallen. This man stood over her and just shot her."

The refugees at Muhajariya were not aware of the minutiae of the UN resolution or the machinations of the big powers. Asked whether they felt the government had made the situation safe for them, Babikir Ali smiled bitterly. "We are a problem. If we go back to our village, the Janjaweed will come again and kill off the rest of us. Then there is no longer a problem. Maybe that is what the outside world wants."



Link


just gruel.
0 Replies
 
Thok
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Aug, 2004 01:40 am
Rains hold up vital supplies for villagers fleeing Sudan crisis

Quote:
On the banks of the Mura river in eastern Chad, they are having a party. Women light campfires to cook maize and tomatoes, men pass each other cigarettes and children run around asking for presents.

The rainy season in Chad has always been welcome, feeding crops and transforming a desert landscape into something lush. This year, it has produced another source of wealth. Villagers have part-time jobs as porters, carrying food, medicines, sometimes entire trucks belonging to international aid agencies across the swollen river.

"I get 500 francs (52p) every time I pull a car out of the water," said 15-year-old Mohammed Ada, standing by the river in ragged shorts and bare feet. "If they are really stuck I ask for 1,000 francs."

The Wadi Mura, a river that appears for three months each year, is a logistical nightmare for aid agencies trying to ferry supplies to refugee camps filled with people fleeing the violence in Darfur.

The waters have cut off access to two major refugee camps, Breijing and Forchana, and around the country other wadis are causing problems too. In the middle of the Wadi Mura, a truck that part-sank a few weeks ago makes crossings even more perilous.

Aid agencies have known for months that the rainy season in Darfur and eastern Chad would make it much harder to get essential foods and medicines to the 190,000 refugees in Chad and 1.2 million displaced people who have been driven from their homes in Darfur by Arab militias and the Sudanese military. But until the last two months they have not been able to tell just how difficult the job will be.

Twelve trucks from the World Food Programme waited on the eastern side of the Wadi Mura for three nights, the drivers hoping the waters will fall. On the fourth morning, they gave up. Ali, a WFP worker who stayed with the trucks, said: "The flow of this river is treacherous and impossible to predict. It rains hundreds of kilometres away and sometimes the waters rise and sometimes they don't."

Breijing, a camp designed for 20,000 people but holding double that number, desperately needs the food to get through soon. Jasdal Gill, at WFP, said: "We have enough supplies to feed people in Breijing until the end of the rainy season but we will have to find other ways to get food in soon. If the rivers still block our progress, we will have to start airlifting."

But, for people around the Wadi Mura and the nearby town of Abeche, the rising waters and the humanitarian crisis have proved a lucrative business opportunity. Issaldhia Dial, a general in the Chad army, rents out two water trucks and a new Land Rover, one of the few vehicles that can navigate the muddy tracks. Rental has risen from $100 to $250 a day.

"The rains are making our lives difficult and incredibly expensive," said one worker with Médecins Sans Frontières in Abeche. "The local companies see we are desperate and they hike up their charges because they know we have no choice."


Link

But is this only for a short time...
0 Replies
 
au1929
 
  1  
Reply Mon 23 Aug, 2004 07:11 am
FURBURANGA, Sudan In Darfur, the killers pray toward Mecca. The million displaced people do as well..
Here in this western region of Sudan, marauding men on horseback, the women raped by them, the rebels who incited the fighting and the politicians, soldiers and police officers who have failed to control it - nearly all are Muslim..
There was the man from one of Darfur's African tribes who walked into an empty field near the refugee camp he now calls home and prayed - for life to return to normal, for his family's suffering to end, for his fear to dissipate..
He stood, then knelt, then touched his forehead to a small mat, and the despair around him faded, he said, if only for a moment..
But at some of the burned-out villages that now scar Darfur's landscape, there are signs of disregard for religion - charred pages from Korans scattered in the rubble, makeshift mosques leveled..
Sudan has a history of Christian-Muslim frictions and war. A rebel movement in the south, dominated by Christians, has fought the Islamic government in Khartoum for decades, largely over religious freedom..
That conflict now appears to be petering out, partly because of the involvement of the United States..
But instead of peace, Sudan is now mired in a grievous conflict in Darfur. Political rivalries, ethnic strife and poverty have fueled the clashes, but that has not stopped combatants from invoking religion and challenging the devotion of their rivals..
In the long history of the Muslims, "it is not uncommon for people to question each other's version of Islam," said Arif Shaikh, a representative of Islamic Relief USA, who visited Darfur in April. "But this is really a political, not a religious, dispute. So much animosity has built up, and that's why it's gotten to this level.".
While the Muslims fight, many Sudanese revert to their historic grudges, directed against Christians, the United States and foreigners in general..
Inside the mosques of Khartoum, which follow the Sunni branch of Islam, there has been plenty of discussion about the violence in Darfur but little success at finding a way to end the bloodshed..
No religious leader has yet publicly chastised the combatants, either Arab or African. But America-bashing, long a theme at Friday prayers, is as fierce as ever..
"We caution our people in Sudan and our people in western Sudan against trusting the USA, that it wants to help them," an imam, Abd-al-Jalil al-Nathir al-Karuri, said in a sermon broadcast on television in early August. "What is being done now is for the interests of one country: Israel.".
Another imam, Isam Ahmad al-Bashir, in a sermon translated from Arabic by the BBC, urged his followers at another Friday prayer service to resist foreign intervention..
"We must all say, irrespective of our different affiliations and leanings, races and groups, a resounding no to foreign intervention, which is lying in wait for our people," he said..
"This is an issue that requires no bargaining," he continued. "Divinity, morality and humanity is required in denouncing all forms of foreign intervention or we will be committing treason against God, religion and country.".
Sudan has much experience with religious war. The continuing conflict with the Christians began in 1983 after the president at the time, Gaafar al-Nimeiry, began a campaign to make the country adhere more closely to Islamic law, or Shariah..
His effort included amputations as punishments for theft and public lashings for alcohol consumption..
The current president, Omar Hassan Ahmed al-Bashir, took over in a coup six years later..
He replaced non-Muslim judges in the south with Muslims and applied Shariah penalties to many non-Muslims in Khartoum and parts of the north..
He also said the government's battle with southern rebels was a jihad..
The questions remain today: Should Shariah apply to southerners who are not Muslim?.
Or should the government, dominated by Muslims, accommodate varying faiths?.
Peace negotiations for the south that have been under way in Kenya have reached compromises: Shariah would remain in effect in Khartoum, under the tentative deal the two sides have signed, but the south would have its own legal code..
Another agreement would give southerners the ability to hold a referendum for self-rule..
Some trace the conflict in Darfur to a power struggle among top Muslim leaders in Khartoum..
Here in Furburanga, a village just six miles from the Chad border, about a dozen sheiks gathered recently to explain their view of the violence. The Africans sat on one side and the Arabs clustered on the other..
An Arab sheik spoke first, saying that the conflict could be resolved without outside involvement if everyone would simply follow the established principles of Islam..
"Prophet Muhammad says in the Koran that Muslims should talk and discuss and solve our problems," he said..
"The Islamic religion has as its principle to love and be peaceful.".
He then questioned the religious conviction of some combatants, particularly the black African rebels..
An African sheik spoke next..
He questioned the devotion to Islam of those in the government-backed militias who attacked his people. He said he searched for a divine reason in all that had occurred..
"God has punished us," he said. "We just have to figure out why.".
The New York Times
0 Replies
 
Thok
 
  1  
Reply Tue 24 Aug, 2004 01:43 am
Hunted by death squads, a people without hope

Quote:
The foreign secretary, Jack Straw, will today fly from the Sudanese capital Khartoum to the country's western Darfur region where more than 1 million people have been been displaced by fighting. Mr Straw will visit the Abu Shouk camp housing 60,000 refugees. Many of them fled after attacks on villages by the Janjaweed, a militia armed by the Sudanese government and supported by its army and air force. The Foreign Office, whose strategy is to work with the Sudanese government, insists there is no clear evidence the Sudanese military and air force have joined attacks in the past four months. But, as Jeevan Vasagar reports, refugees fleeing Darfur for neighbouring Chad tell a different story

Hawa Abdullahi's father pulls back her orange shawl to show where a bullet smashed through her upper arm. The 15-year-old girl is in pain and traumatised, but in her family she is the fortunate one. Four of her brothers are dead after an attack they blame on the Janjaweed.

"Maybe God knows why this happened," said Maryam Ayacoub Solomon, the mother of the murdered boys. "I don't know. I don't know what to say - I have no words left."

Every few days, more refugees from Darfur cross the border into eastern Chad. They all tell the same story; in recent days and weeks, there have been fresh attacks on black African villages involving Janjaweed fighters backed up by Sudanese government troops.

Despite a UN security council resolution demanding that Sudan disarms the Janjaweed, Khartoum's war against its own people goes on.

UN officials say that 11 vil lages close to the border with Chad are believed to have been cleared in a campaign that began a few days after the security council resolution was passed.

Nearly 500 refugees have been registered by the UN after crossing the border at Senett, near the village of Birak in eastern Chad.

Abdel Moula Abdullahi, 25, told the Guardian he had escaped an attack on Diba village in west Darfur on August 9. "They came at 6am. It was raining and everyone was in the village," he said. "The women cried out: 'The Janjaweed are coming'.

"The men and women ran from the village. As they were running, the Janjaweed were shooting.

"The Sudanese military came with five vehicles. They shot the people with machine guns. The Janjaweed threw hand grenades to burn down our houses."

Mr Abdullahi's home now is a piece of plastic sheeting spread over a framework of branches, with a handful of possessions inside; blackened cooking pans, a dagger and an ancient plastic tub of blue hair gel. There is a waist-high stockade of branches to keep animals out.

Another refugee, Osman Yahya Khadir, 52, escaped an attack on Gazmoun village last Wednesday. According to his account, Sudanese military helicopters circled in the sky overhead while Janjaweed attacked on the ground.

"When I heard the noise of the helicopters, I ran to hide in the mountains, because I knew the Janjaweed would come," said Mr Khadir, a tall man in a long, white robe.

"I knew from the other villages that it had happened like that. They told me: 'When you hear the helicopters and the planes, the Janjaweed are coming'.

"We drove our herds of animals towards the mountains. The Janjaweed came to take our animals and killed five people." Both these villages have previously been attacked by Janjaweed and government forces, and their inhabitants had fled to Chad.



complete report
0 Replies
 
au1929
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2004 07:47 am
Another panel another review and another conclusion. And a lot of bull crap. How far has civilization advanced from our days of living in caves. Not a damn bit The concept of survival of the fittest and might make right prevails.



U.S. Report on Violence in Sudan Finds a 'Pattern of Atrocities'

By MARC LACEY

Published: August 25, 2004

NAIROBI, Kenya, Aug. 24 - A preliminary State Department review of the violence waged in the Darfur region of Sudan has implicated government-backed militias in "a consistent and widespread pattern of atrocities," including murder, torture, rape and ethnic humiliation.

The study, based on 257 interviews conducted in refugee settlements in neighboring Chad in the last two weeks of July, is part of the Bush administration's investigation of whether the killing in Darfur amounts to genocide. The report does not address that question directly but analyzes the chilling testimony of refugees driven from their homes in western Sudan.





The study, conducted by State Department officials together with outside legal experts, found that nearly one-third of the refugees interviewed reported hearing racial epithets while under attack, and that nearly 60 percent of them reported witnessed the killing of a family member. Twenty percent of the respondents said they had witnessed a rape and another 25 percent had witnessed beatings.

"The purpose of the report is not to come to a determination on genocide," said a State Department official. "What these guys are doing is collecting firsthand information that would serve as the documentary evidence on whether the legal standard has been met."

Genocide is defined as a calculated effort to destroy a national, ethnic, racial or religious group. Congress has already declared that what has happened in Darfur, where more than million black Africans have been driven from their villages by armed Arabs, amounts to genocide. A separate review by the European Union, however, disputed that.

The Bush administration is treading carefully on the issue, wanting to pressure the Sudanese government to disarm the militias but without ruining the progress made in peace talks aimed at ending a separate civil war with southern rebels.

In the preliminary study, roughly half of the respondents said government soldiers had joined Arab militias, known as the Janjaweed, in attacking black African villages. One quarter of the refugees said they were attacked by soldiers alone. Another 17 percent said militias alone attacked them.

Based on the testimony, the survey declared that "the primary cleavage defining this conflict appears to be ethnic," with Arab soldiers and militia attacking non-Arab villagers.

"Numerous credible reports point to the use of racial and ethnic epithets by both the Jingaweit and GOS military personnel," the report said, using an alternative spelling for the militias and an abbreviation for the Government of Sudan.

Among the epithets that the interviewers reported were "Kill the slaves" and "We have orders to kill all the blacks." One refugee reported that a militia member had stated, "We kill all blacks and even kill our cattle when they have black calves."

The report indicated that the extent of the killing in Darfur, which ranges from 30,000 victims to many times more, is difficult to pin down. "Numerous accounts point to mass abductions; the respondents usually do not know the abductees' fate," the report said. "A few respondents have indicated personal knowledge of mass executions and gravesites."

The report, dated Aug. 5, is the first part of the genocide review. It will be followed up in the coming weeks by a more thorough review of 1,100 refugee interviews. To conduct them, the surveyors, known as an Atrocities Documentation Team, select each 10th dwelling and conduct their talks without the presence of any outsiders, besides an independent translator.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 Aug, 2004 11:33 am
Some collected info:

This site - Darfur Conflict: Key Documentation - is maintained by the Institute for Security Studies South Africa. It provides free access to a collection of full text treaties, communiques and cease fire agreements relating to Darfur and the Sudan conflict. They include resolutions from the United Nations, African Union documents and materials from the Ceasefire Commision.


Sudan: Amnesty International
provides access to a collection of materials relating to the political, economic and human rights situation in Sudan which have been published by Amnesty International. They include press releases, statements, full text reports, campaign materials and photographs issued from the mid 1990s to the present day. They include coverage of the civil war, humanitarian crisis in Darfur and alleged human rights abuses.
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