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Sewing with water resistant materials

 
 
Reply Sat 16 Aug, 2014 07:53 pm
Anyone have any experience sewing with coated cotton or ripstop nylon? My daughter remembers the poncho I made for her with the alphabet appliqued along the hem when she was in kindergarten. It was made from tightly woven cotton but that fabric is difficult to find. She wants one for her daughter and I thought as my son and his family now live in Washington State, all the kids could use a nice, bright, rainshedding poncho.
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 1,147 • Replies: 12
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Aug, 2014 07:57 pm
@plainoldme,
I use to sew a lot but not at that level.. but the first thing I think of is rolls of cotton or linen canvas, somehow waterproofed (no, not using gesso). I've no clue if this is a silly idea but I'm guessing it is.

If I were ferreting out how to do this, I might look up Patagonia products and see what they mention.
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Aug, 2014 08:04 pm
@ossobuco,
Believe me, sewing a poncho is very simple. It can be done in about two hours. No buttons and no zippers. The fabric I referred to is what is now called oilcloth, not to be confused with the oilcloth sold at the five and dime and used as tablecloths from the 1920s into the early 1960s. This is pretty but I would prefer tightly woven cotton.

I will use McCalls pattern 6431,
Butrflynet
 
  2  
Reply Sat 16 Aug, 2014 08:18 pm
@plainoldme,
Laminated fabrics are popular now for making tote bags, hats, etc. I remembered Nancy Zimmerman talking about them on her PBS show and found this on her website. It gives tips for working with the fabric.

http://www.nancyzieman.com/blog/quick-sewing-projects/sewing-tips-with-laminated-fabric/


Here are more.

http://www.rileyblakedesigns.com/laminate-tips/


Google laminated fabrics to find a source near you.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Aug, 2014 08:21 pm
@plainoldme,
Huipeles might even be quicker.. sans embroidery.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Aug, 2014 08:23 pm
@plainoldme,
Oh, I didn't mean I took it as hard to do, I meant about all the new materials and how to deal with them. I should have been more clear.

Will be interested in how you work it out.
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plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Aug, 2014 06:13 pm
@Butrflynet,
Thanks for that link. I will watch it as soon as the house quiets down.
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plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Aug, 2014 06:25 pm
@Butrflynet,
I just saw there was more to your post. I spent three nights on line looking for laminated fabrics under many names. Actually, rain coat fabrics was the most successful "label."

There is one quilt shop which sells some laminates as part of promotion involving making your own sandwich wraps, food storage bags and lunch bags. I really didn't like any of the fabrics they stocked for the purpose of rainwear.

I made my daughter's -- more than 30 years ago -- from tightly woven cotton. I have a similar garment I purchased just before I made hers from a less tightly woven cotton. I also have a raincoat made from the sort of fabric I really want but finding such material is next to impossible.

The laminates generally come from Korea and the biggest source is from Korea and shipping takes about 3 weeks.
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Aug, 2014 06:31 pm
@ossobuco,
If you look at this link, you will see that a huipile might resemble what we call a poncho: https://www.etsy.com/listing/194856980/uncut-mccalls-easy-pattern-6431-girls?utm_source=google&utm_medium=product_listing_promoted&utm_campaign=supplies-pattern-low&gclid=CjwKEAjw68ufBRDt0Zmrn4W_8AwSJADcjp1cr7I37UUXfZUlapmv2Ic2rFoLY7riCN15fvCi7nHyeRoC_U3w_wcB

But, when I asked google what is the difference between a huipile and a poncho, I was referred to an article on the rebozo which said that they are all basically the same. Interestingly, fringes were not used with native clothing until after the Spanish took over Mexico and Central America.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 19 Aug, 2014 06:53 pm
@plainoldme,
I think of huipiles as more rectangular (with hole midway) - I just gave mine away recently - and ponchos as somehow covering more. Rebozos, I still have a great one, long rectangular length of woven indigo wool with fringed ends. I'll have to nose around on google images re what they're all usually called since I'm only used to what I've seen in the places I've been in Guatemala and Mexico, and I certainly didn't get everywhere, only a start.

Plus I think of ponchos most recently as those bright yellow plastic almost tentlike things, obviously not the original type poncho, though maybe similar shape.
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  2  
Reply Tue 19 Aug, 2014 07:30 pm
@plainoldme,
Go to amazon.com and do a search using the following words:

arts crafts sewing fabric laminated


You will find 5 pages of laminated fabrics aka PUL (polyurethane laminated ) fabric.
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Aug, 2014 10:51 pm
@Butrflynet,
I just came here today because several hours ago, the light dawned on my marblehead and I went to amazon.com.

I've learned a lot today. One thing is that while oilcloth may not be food or child safe because of thphalates, laminated cotton is. The two older girls have selected laminated cottons.

Thanks, butrflynet!
0 Replies
 
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Aug, 2014 10:51 pm
I also found this: http://www.pinterest.com/Laminates/laminated-cotton-projects/
0 Replies
 
 

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