Butrflynet
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 01:40 pm
@Butrflynet,
According to this 2012 news brief on the company's website, a consortium of companies has been working on this. Companies located in Kentucky, California and other locations


http://www.mappbio.com/ebola.html


Quote:
In addition, the production method used in this study offers the potential to make an economical and effective medical countermeasure, according to the authors. Initially developed as a monoclonal antibody cocktail in the mouse model, MB-003 was successfully humanized and then produced in the tobacco plant-based production system.

"We were pleased to see how well the humanized mAbs of MB-003 performed," said Larry Zeitlin, Ph.D., president of Mapp Biopharmaceutical and senior author on the study. "We also were pleasantly surprised by the superiority of the plant-derived mAbs compared to the same mAbs produced in traditional mammalian cell culture."

Further improvement in antibody efficacy was developed at Kentucky BioProcessing (KBP). Using a fully automated production system that operates in accordance with good manufacturing practices (GMP), antibody is produced in a tobacco plant system. This new development process significantly decreases the amount of time required for production, increases the quantity of antibody produced, and slashes the cost of manufacturing, according to Barry Bratcher, chief operating officer of KBP and co-author on the PNAS study.



More info about the companies here:

http://www.nbcnews.com/storyline/ebola-virus-outbreak/experimental-ebola-treatment-came-california-company-n172321

Quote:
ZMapp is a combination of two agents, made by Mapp with LeafBio in San Diego and Defyrus Inc. in Toronto. One of them, MB-003, provided 100 percent protection to monkeys when given right after exposure to Ebola virus, and even helped after symptoms developed.

The other is ZMAb, a combination drug that its developer says provided 100 percent survival in primates a day after exposure and 50 percent survival after two days.



Interesting that the tobacco plant has proved more successful in production than the usual human cellular processes. Tobacco companies will love that.
ossobuco
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 02:13 pm
@Butrflynet,
Good to read these last two posts, Butryfly, thanks for the info.
0 Replies
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 02:44 pm
I'm not an expert on 'carriers' and 'incubation periods', but every time you board an airliner surely there's always the risk that you'll catch something that another passenger has got, even if they aren't showing any symptoms yet?
I mean, an airline cabin is a sealed metal tube where everybody's breathing each others air..
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 02:50 pm
@roger,
Dozens of people die every year from champagne corks!!! Don't you care? Oh the humanity....

(Again, my point is the hyped up danger of very unlikely events... it is true that for Americans the risk of death by champagne cork is far higher than death by either ebola or super-volcano.)
0 Replies
 
maxdancona
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 02:51 pm
@farmerman,
No... my point is that the excessive hype over the caldera volcano is bullshit. I don't think I have modified this stance at all.

I am objecting to excessive hype and irrational fear.


Romeo Fabulini
 
  0  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 05:09 pm
The opening titles of 'Survivors' shows how plague can be quickly spread by air travel, in this case a butter-fingered scientist drops a bottle of germs then hops on a plane and accidentally infects passengers and it spreads like wildfire around the world and wipes out billions-

maxdancona
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 05:20 pm
@Romeo Fabulini,
Do you also know how easy it is for lab monkeys to learn how to talk and then take over the world? (Let's not talk about how easy it is for a Sumerian demon to wreak havoc in the form of a giant Marshmallow Man).
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 05:34 pm
@maxdancona,
Quote:
No... my point is that the excessive hype over the caldera volcano is bullshit. I don't think I have modified this stance at all.

I am objecting to excessive hype and irrational fear.

Im really not aware of any excessive hype on this one. There are 4 calderas in the US lower 48 that could be classified as "Supervolcanoes" , only one of which can be considered "dead"

I usually don't watch the TV "geospecials" on history or Discovery because they are more entertainment than science. But every thing Id seen on , say PBS or Nat Geo channel has been reasonable.



There are 4 calderas in the US lower 48 that could be classified as "Supervolcanoes" , only one of which can be considered "dead"


One of them had a mini eruption on the same day that Mt St Helens blew in 1980.
These calderas are huge and , as a rule in geology.
The best way to predict the next disaster in an area, is to look at the last disaster in the same area.
Butrflynet
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 07:47 pm
@farmerman,
I don't think it is excessive hype coming from the scientific communities. The various earthquake swarms in the area over the last few years have generated heightened interest as experts try to understand and learn from the geologic history of the region to help explain and predict the current activity.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 5 Aug, 2014 04:43 am
@Butrflynet,
I guess some people read that as "hype". I wonder what max would say if the USGS would try to keep the seismic history information secret.
Have you ever been to the Valles caldera? Its next to Los Alamos and I believe it was a park . Its a neat obsidian source (Im not sure they lt you "collect" any longer, I was there with guys from the labs)


maxdancona
 
  0  
Reply Tue 5 Aug, 2014 06:10 am
@farmerman,
Quote:
I wonder what max would say if the USGS would try to keep the seismic history information secret.


URL: http://able2know.org/reply/post-5733875


You know... I am right here. You could just ask.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Aug, 2014 08:51 am
@maxdancona,
I ws talking to butterflynet. Im glad you checked in though. Any opinions?

PS, U of Utah has the contrct to monitor all the Yellowstone seismic stations. Heres the station map and you can link onto the station plots week by week.http://quake.utah.edu/helicorder/yell_webi.htm
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  -3  
Reply Tue 5 Aug, 2014 10:31 am

Supervolcanoes are interesting, but isn't this thread about the current Ebola outbreak?
0 Replies
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  0  
Reply Tue 5 Aug, 2014 02:03 pm
As a matter of interest why has my video about plagues being spread by air travel been voted down?
Do I detect fear from some A2K people who are afraid to face facts?..Wink

PS- I hear an American aid worker caught ebola and has been flown home to Atlanta and hospitalised, and the public are worried and raising hell about it in case he infects America
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Aug, 2014 03:02 pm
@Romeo Fabulini,
that's only the people who listen to Rush Limbaugh and Glenn Beck. Theyre just nuts.
0 Replies
 
neologist
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Aug, 2014 04:01 pm
@Romeo Fabulini,
Some people just have a reflex, I guess.
Me. A high neg piques my interest
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Aug, 2014 04:47 pm
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:

I guess some people read that as "hype". I wonder what max would say if the USGS would try to keep the seismic history information secret.
Have you ever been to the Valles caldera? Its next to Los Alamos and I believe it was a park . Its a neat obsidian source (Im not sure they lt you "collect" any longer, I was there with guys from the labs)



I haven't been able to go anywhere in NM except the grocery store, the doctors' offices, and various hospitals, in ABQ and Rio Rancho and a fishing trip up to Monastary Lake.

Saw quite an eye full of beautiful and interesting geologic scenery on the drive from the SF Bay Area to ABQ via the southern route when I moved here. Would like to do that again through Arizona and New Mexico at a much slower pace so I can do more than just glance at things as they whipped by from the highway.

I have a list of things in NM I'd like to see some day. I'll add that to the list.

Next week I am doing a 11-hour marathon drive from ABQ to Austin, TX so will get a glance of the scenery along that route. If I have time when I return the following week doing the same 1-day drive, I'd like to go see the meteor crater in Odessa, TX. It doesn't look like too much of a detour.

While there, I'll check for any alien spaceships carrying the ebola virus. Wink
0 Replies
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  0  
Reply Tue 5 Aug, 2014 05:07 pm
" I looked, and behold, a pale horse; and he who sat on it had the name Death; and Hades was following with him.
Authority was given to them over a fourth of the earth, to kill with sword and with famine and with pestilence and by the wild beasts of the earth." (Revelation 6:8)


Here's a 9-minute clip from the first episode of 'Survivors', it opens with a jolly bit of tennis practice, what can possibly go wrong?-

0 Replies
 
graceforall
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Aug, 2014 10:48 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
But I do trust facts, rationally, clearly, and what can be proven in my approach in what action I can take.
0 Replies
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Aug, 2014 08:13 am
Clip 2: the hospitals are getting crowded..

0 Replies
 
 

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