BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jul, 2014 04:33 pm
@farmerman,
Quote:
PS, your "flip floppery" did not go unnoticed.


LOL you mean that for the sake of argument I was nice enough to assume that somehow the civil engineers could get such a structure up at least long enough so it could fall back killing a few hundreds thousands people under the debris footprint?

No I do not think anyone is going to died either putting it up or afterward as it likely will exist only in the dreams of all of us for at least many centuries.
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jul, 2014 05:00 pm
@farmerman,
Sorry sometime technology is worth and more then worth the known risks.

Second those figures you quoted for deaths from nuclear rockets who would be launch in the middle of nowhere was taken out of someone rear end as even around the La Vegas nuclear test side you can not get any agreement on the possible harm that was done to the fairly large population around the site in the 1950s.

A site that pump far far far more radioactive into the atmosphere over a few years then a nuclear rocket program would do in a hundred years.

As I had stated before it look like the safety first people are going to close the future off for the West and I can only hope some other society will take up the banner for the human race.

Farmerman I bet you would just love the old man that was tour guide at the former Vegas test site that was very proud of the numbers of tests he had witness in the 50s/60s where once he was knocked off his feet from the blast.

He did not have a high regard for the H&S scientists and physicians either stating that his life time exposure should had been deadly to him in theory instead he is an old man in good health.

He gave the number for his total lifetime exposure but sadly I did not take note of it.

0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jul, 2014 05:42 pm
@Setanta,
Quote:
i ran across an article about a Japanese firm that says the can build elevator cars which till take you to geosynchronous orbit


I would strongly suggest to anyone designing the elevator cars read Arthur Clarke ideas for such a car contain in his book Fountains of Paradise.

Oh somehow they was going to do the whole trip in five hours!!!!!!

See below

Quote:
Space Express

"Now don't you say," begged Warren Kingsley, "it'll never get off the ground."

"I was tempted," chuckled Morgan, as he examined the full-scale mock-up. "It does look rather like an upended railroad coach."

"That's exactly the image we want to sell," Kingsley answered. "You buy your ticket at the station, check in your baggage, settle down in your swivel seat, and admire the view. Or you can go up to the lounge-cum-bar and devote the next five hours to serious drinking, until they carry you off at Midway.

Incidentally, what do you think of the Design Section's idea - nineteenth-century Pullman decor?"

"Not much. Pullman cars didn't have five circular floors, one on top of the other."

"Better tell Design that - they've set their hearts on gas-lighting."


"If they want an antique flavour that's a little more appropriate, I once saw an old space movie at the Sydney Art Museum. There was a shuttle craft of some kind that had a circular observation lounge - just what we need."

"Do you remember its name?"

"Oh - let's think - something like Space Wars 2000. I'm sure you'll be able to trace it."

"I'll tell Design to look it up. Now let's go inside - do you want a hard-hat?"

"No," answered Morgan brusquely. That was one of the few advantages of being ten centimetres shorter than average height.

As they stepped into the mock-up, he felt an almost boyish thrill of anticipation. He had checked the designs, watched the computers playing with the graphics and layout - everything here would be perfectly familiar. But this was real - solid. True, it would never leave the ground, just as the old joke said. But one day its identical brethren would be hurtling up through the clouds and climbing, in only five hours, to Midway Station, twenty-five thousand kilometres from Earth. And all for about one dollar's worth of electricity per passenger.

Even now, it was impossible to realise the full meaning of the coming revolution. For the first time Space itself would become as accessible as any point on the surface of the familiar Earth. In a few more decades, if the average man wanted to spend a weekend on the moon, he could afford to do so. Even Mars would not be out of the question; there were no limitations to what might now be possible.

Morgan came back to earth with a bump, as he almost tripped over a piece of badly-laid carpet.

"Sorry," said his guide, "another of Design's ideas - that green is supposed to remind people of Earth.

The ceilings are going to be blue, getting deeper and deeper on the upper floors. And they want to use indirect lighting everywhere, so that the stars will be visible."

Morgan shook his head. "That's a nice idea, but it won't work. If the lighting's good enough for comfortable reading, the glare will wipe out the stars. You'll need a section of the lounge that can be completely blacked-out."

"That's already planned for part of the bar - you can order your drink, and retire behind the curtains."

They were now standing in the lowest floor of the capsule, a circular room eight metres in diameter, three metres high. All around were miscellaneous boxes, cylinders and control panels bearing such labels as OXYGEN RESERVE, BATTERY, CO, CRACKER, MEDICAL, TEMPERATURE CONTROL.

Everything was clearly of a provisional, temporary nature, liable to be rearranged at a moment's notice.

"Anyone would think we were building a spaceship," Morgan commented. "Incidentally, what's the latest estimate of survival time?"

"As long as power's available, at least a week, even for a full load of fifty passengers. Which is really absurd, since a rescue team could always reach them in three hours, either from Earth or Midway."

"Barring a major catastrophe, like damage to the tower or tracks."

"If that ever happens, I don't think there will be anyone to rescue. But if a capsule gets stuck for some reason, and the passengers don't go mad and gobble up all our delicious emergency compressed food tablets at once, their biggest problem will be boredom."

The second floor was completely empty, devoid even of temporary fittings. Someone had chalked a large rectangle on the curved plastic panel of the wall and printed inside it: AIRLOCK HERi ran across an article about a Japanese firm that says the can build elevator cars which till take you to geosynchronous orbit

"This will be the baggage room - though we're not sure if we'll need so much space. If not, it can be used for extra passengers. Now, this floor's much more interesting -"

The third level contained a dozen aircraft-type chairs, all of different designs; two of them were occupied by realistic dummies, male and female, who looked very bored with the whole proceedings.

"We've practically decided on this model," said Kingsley, pointing to a luxurious tilting swivel-chair with attached small table, "but we'll run the usual survey first."

Morgan punched his fist into the seat cushion.

"Has anyone actually sat in it for five hours?" he asked.

"Yes - a hundred-kilo volunteer. No bed-sores. If people complain, we'll remind them of the pioneering days of aviation, when it took five hours merely to cross the Pacific. And, of course, we're offering low-gee comfort almost all the way."

The floor above was identical in concept, though empty of chairs. They passed through it quickly and reached the next level, to which the designers had obviously devoted most attention.

The bar looked almost functional, and indeed the coffee dispenser was actually working. Above it, in an elaborately gilded frame, was an old engraving of such uncanny relevance that it took Morgan's breath away. A huge full moon dominated the upper left quadrant, and racing towards it was - a bullet-shaped train towing four carriages. From the windows of the compartment labelled "First Class" top-hatted Victorian personages could be seen admiring the view.

"Where did you get hold of that?" Morgan asked in astonished admiration.

"Looks as if the caption's fallen off again," Kingsley apologised, hunting round behind the bar. "Ah, here it is." i ran across an article about a Japanese firm that says the can build elevator cars which till take you to geosynchronous orbit
0 Replies
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  0  
Reply Wed 30 Jul, 2014 07:04 pm
AC Clarke neatly busts some myths and misconceptions in his book, for example he says if a high jumper can clear a 7-foot bar on earth, that doesn't mean he'd be able to clear a 42-foot bar on the moon where the gravity is one-sixth earths (6 x 7 = 42).
He says the jumper would only be able to clear around 30 feet on the moon.
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Wed 30 Jul, 2014 07:39 pm
@Romeo Fabulini,
Quote:
AC Clarke neatly busts some myths and misconceptions in his book, for example he says if a high jumper can clear a 7-foot bar on earth, that doesn't mean he'd be able to clear a 42-foot bar on the moon where the gravity is one-sixth earths (6 x 7 = 42).


Yes , he did love to play with numbers and Newtonian physics almost to the same degree that Asimov did.
Romeo Fabulini
 
  0  
Reply Wed 30 Jul, 2014 07:50 pm
@BillRM,
Yeah, his explanation on page 241 of his book "Greetings Carbon-based Bipeds" is-
"When an athlete clears a 7-foot bar [on Earth], he actually hoists himself less than 5 feet. His centre of gravity which is around waist level is already some 3 feet from the ground.
Allowing for this, the high jump record on the moon will be around 30 feet, and the whole performance will take almost 10 seconds"
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Thu 31 Jul, 2014 03:30 am
HG Wells First Men On The Moon used some sort of anti-gravity paint, in Star Trek they use teleportation. Talking about Science Fiction writers sure beats dealing with scientific reality.

Maybe NASA should spend all its money walking the streets of China shouting "New lamps for old."
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Thu 31 Jul, 2014 05:28 am
@izzythepush,
Or "bring out your dead"

0 Replies
 
Quehoniaomath
 
  -3  
Reply Sat 20 Sep, 2014 01:27 pm
0 Replies
 
edgarblythe
 
  2  
Reply Sat 20 Sep, 2014 01:49 pm
I may have missed it, but I didn't see a mention of Jules Verne's gun that shot a projectile of aluminum at the moon. It only missed because it came in the proximity of an asteroid and was diverted. They splashed down in the ocean at the end of their adventure.
Quehoniaomath
 
  -3  
Reply Sat 20 Sep, 2014 01:58 pm
@edgarblythe,
you missed a lot, and of course you haven't seen the video, now have you?
BillRM
 
  5  
Reply Sat 20 Sep, 2014 02:34 pm
@Quehoniaomath,
Quote:
you missed a lot, and of course you haven't seen the video, now have you?


No one is going to give a nut case supporting a crackpot theory any respect nor should we.

Hell I was there myself for two of the moonship launches and fell the very earth shake under my feet.

To sum up you are an example of an internet nut case.
Setanta
 
  5  
Reply Sat 20 Sep, 2014 02:40 pm
I wish you guys would stop feeding the troll.
0 Replies
 
Quehoniaomath
 
  -3  
Reply Sat 20 Sep, 2014 11:21 pm
@BillRM,
Quote:
No one is going to give a nut case supporting a crackpot theory any respect nor should we.

Hell I was there myself for two of the moonship launches and fell the very earth shake under my feet.

To sum up you are an example of an internet nut case.


So, you haven't researched any of this, now have you?
0 Replies
 
Quehoniaomath
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 31 Jan, 2015 02:13 pm
It IS true, it was a small step, very small! just only here on our earth.
0 Replies
 
carloslebaron
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 1 Feb, 2015 12:13 pm


From 3.34 to 4:08 the video is funny.

Who can beat that?


0 Replies
 
 

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