6
   

Is Pi (3.1415926....) a Lie?

 
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Jul, 2014 09:02 am
@Quehoniaomath,
Who is Jain of Oz?
Quehoniaomath
 
  0  
Reply Fri 11 Jul, 2014 10:04 am
@George,
Quote:
Who is Jain of Oz?


he is from Australia, hence...Oz,

He is deep in real mathematics, that is, Vedic mathematics.
Once you understand vedic math you understand the stupidity, ugliness, and
awkwardness of the more than idiotic conventional math! Actually, conventional math is quite a mess! And by design and on purpose!
Quehoniaomath
 
  0  
Reply Fri 11 Jul, 2014 11:21 am
@ossobuco,
Quote:
I read about - at some length then but then I forget by now - about http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Quetzalcoatl


your confusing me with Quetzalcoatl. I am not him Smile


Quote:
So, we have an obsessive digger to disprove all present science, more interested in looming and pissing.


Nope, not obsessive. And yes, the whole of science is wrong!
But it seems as one says this, you have to be called an "more interested in looming and pissing"
And that just means you don't get it.
It is Cognivive Dissonance in action.
No, I am not interested in that. I am only interested in truth,
Not in popularity. I don't give a damns about that.

It seems most people are having trouble to see someone looking for truth.
While the truth is, that this whole world is filled with lies.
But if you want truth it seems you have to give up or don't give a damn
about popularity. Because in reality, people want something new, but ohh please, not too new!

0 Replies
 
George
 
  1  
Reply Fri 11 Jul, 2014 11:55 am
@Quehoniaomath,
Quehoniaomath wrote:
. . . he is from Australia, hence...Oz, . . .
I trust you're being facetious.
Who is Jain of Oz?
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 12 Jul, 2014 11:32 am
@Quehoniaomath,
Some of my own curiosity about Pi revisited here

http://able2know.org/topic/249327-1

…where I incidentally attack Mac for being unable to find consecutive sequences
dalehileman
 
  0  
Reply Sat 12 Jul, 2014 01:30 pm
@dalehileman,
…while it's interesting to speculate, if it's proven eg, that if curvature is a necessary character of space, whether Que might be right; though not necessarily for the exact reasons he puts forth
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Sat 12 Jul, 2014 01:44 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:

…while it's interesting to speculate, if it's proven eg, that if curvature is a necessary character of space, whether Que might be right; though not necessarily for the exact reasons he puts forth


The problem I have with Q's thesis is that he paints it as a lie.

It may be incorrect...or it may be that a closer approximation can be made.

BUT IT IS NOT A LIE...even if it is an error.
maxdancona
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jul, 2014 10:40 am
@Frank Apisa,
No Frank, if Q is right, then they are lying.

Pi is a value that can easily be measured by anyone who has a way to draw precise circles. We are talking about a difference of 1 in 1,000. This would not be difficult to find.

To keep the true value of Pi a secret would require a cover-up of massive proportions by anyone with the equipment one would find in a high school science lab.
Quehoniaomath
 
  0  
Reply Sun 13 Jul, 2014 12:33 pm
@maxdancona,
Quote:
To keep the true value of Pi a secret would require a cover-up of massive proportions by anyone with the equipment one would find in a high school science lab.


All is needed is a conviction that the right value of Pi is known, because if people think that , why checking it?
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jul, 2014 12:51 pm
@maxdancona,
maxdancona wrote:

No Frank, if Q is right, then they are lying.

Pi is a value that can easily be measured by anyone who has a way to draw precise circles. We are talking about a difference of 1 in 1,000. This would not be difficult to find.

To keep the true value of Pi a secret would require a cover-up of massive proportions by anyone with the equipment one would find in a high school science lab.



No, Max...they may be right or wrong. But to call it a lie...is laughable.
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jul, 2014 01:13 pm
@Quehoniaomath,
Quehoniaomath wrote:
All is needed is a conviction that the right value of Pi is known, because if people think that , why checking it?


It's fun to check the values of things. I have just written a Monte Carlo method in BASIC and got to 3.1415926. There are programs that can calculate 1 billion places in less than 1 hour on a modern PC

One billion (10^9) digits of pi (actually 1,000,000,001 digits if you count the initial "3") are in a file at MIT:

http://stuff.mit.edu/afs/sipb/contrib/pi/pi-billion.txt

DON'T just click on the link, your browser will try to open a 1 gigabyte file! Right click and choose "Save as...". It took about 30 minutes for me.

A program called pifast has been used to get 25 billion digits, a record for a home computer:

http://numbers.computation.free.fr/Constants/PiProgram/pifast.html





dalehileman
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 13 Jul, 2014 01:25 pm
@contrex,
It might be interesting Con to access that site, see how many instances of consecutive zeroes, the number of digits in the longest one, how many times it had occurred

Of course you would get pretty much the same results with 9's or 4's but it might be instructive to compare the number of reps with that of a series with one less digit, as we discuss in

http://able2know.org/topic/249327-1#top
0 Replies
 
Quehoniaomath
 
  0  
Reply Sun 13 Jul, 2014 05:56 pm
@contrex,
Quote:
It's fun to check the values of things. I have just written a Monte Carlo method in BASIC and got to 3.1415926. There are programs that can calculate 1 billion places in less than 1 hour on a modern PC

One billion (10^9) digits of pi (actually 1,000,000,001 digits if you count the initial "3") are in a file at MIT:

http://stuff.mit.edu/afs/sipb/contrib/pi/pi-billion.txt

DON'T just click on the link, your browser will try to open a 1 gigabyte file! Right click and choose "Save as...". It took about 30 minutes for me.

A program called pifast has been used to get 25 billion digits, a record for a home computer:

http://numbers.computation.free.fr/Constants/PiProgram/pifast.html


well, if you are trying to impress me with computer and computerlanguage, it won't work at all. I have studied basic, Turbo Pascal and C++ myself as I have worked in the ICT.
But well, you know how it is, GI-GO, Garbage in, Garbage Out.
If the calculations is done wrongly, you get everytime a wrong answer!
Even if it is more then 1000 biljon figures!!!!
Wrong is still wrong! Pi is wrong, the official Pi that is. No matter how many figures after the comma!


0 Replies
 
raprap
 
  1  
Reply Sun 13 Jul, 2014 08:02 pm
The Indiana Pi Bill is the popular name for bill #246 of the 1897 sitting of the Indiana General Assembly, one of the most famous attempts to establish mathematical truth by legislative fiat. Despite that name, the main result claimed by the bill is a method to square the circle, rather than to establish a certain value for the mathematical constant π (pi), the ratio of the circumference of a circle to its diameter. However, the bill does contain text that appears to dictate various incorrect values of π, such as 3.2

I presently live in Indiana--I can't believe that Hoosier's didn't fall for this-hook, line and fiat.

Rap
0 Replies
 
dalehileman
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 14 Jul, 2014 01:36 pm
@contrex,
It might be interesting Con to access that site, see how many instances of consecutive zeroes, the number of digits in the longest one, how many times it had occurred

Of course you would get pretty much the same results with 9's or 4's but it might be instructive to compare the number of reps with that of a series with one less digit, as we discuss in

http://able2know.org/topic/249327-1#top
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Mon 14 Jul, 2014 01:46 pm
@dalehileman,
dalehileman wrote:
It might be interesting Con to access that site


I don't know what you mean by "access that site"; all you have to do is right click the link I gave and save the text file to your hard drive.

Unless you have a Mac which only has one button on the mouse?

What purpose do you have in hunting for these sequences?



dalehileman
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 14 Jul, 2014 02:35 pm
@contrex,
dalehileman wrote:
It might be interesting Con to access that site

Quote:
I don't know what you mean by "access that site"; all you have to…..
Of course. Sorry Con if I wasn't clear

Quote:
Unless you have a Mac which only has one button on the mouse?
The problem wasn't my mouse but the somewhat inadequate a2k software having limited search capabilities. In fact just as you suggest I did copy one such Pi to Word, where I conducted a trial search using a routine titled "find all" or something like that, to determine whether it was feasible to look for patterns in the distribution of digits

Quote:
What purpose do you have in hunting for these sequences?
To determine whether I might find any patterns. For instance I might look for "00"; then, say, "000", comparing their frequency and distribution
0 Replies
 
Liddz
 
  0  
Reply Thu 1 Mar, 2018 06:26 pm
@Quehoniaomath,
Golden Pi = 3.144605511029693 is the correct value of Pi and this fact can be proven by almost anybody that has sufficient knowledge of the principles of the Kepler right triangle including the creation of a circle with a circumference equal in measure to the perimeter of a square.
The correct value of the Golden ratio will determine the correct value of both the square root of the Golden ratio and Pi. Traditional Pi 3.141592653589793 is also false because it is based upon a false value for the Golden ratio for example traditional Pi 3.141592653589793 can also be gained from 4 divided by the square root of 1.621138938277405 = 1.273239544735163. The ratio 1.621138938277405 can be gained in Trigonometry through the formula Cosine (35.84839254086685) multiplied by 2. The ratio 1.621138938277405 is a very poor approximation of the real Golden ratio of 1.618. The correct value for the Golden ratio is Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.618033988749895 and the correct value for the square root of the Golden ratio is 1.27201964951406. 16 divided by traditional Pi 3.141592653589793 squared = 9.869604401089357 results in the False value of the Golden ratio 1.621138938277405, while 16 divided by Golden Pi 3.144605511029693 squared = 9.888543819998317 = 1.618033988749895. Remember that 1.618033988749895 is the real Golden ratio and NOT 1.621138938277405. We do not even need to use any of the Pi values to determine the diameter of a circle or the circumference of a circle instead we can use the Square root of the Golden ratio = 1.27201964951406. If we multiply 1 quarter of the circle's circumference by 1.27201964951406 then the result is the correct measure for the circle's diameter. If we already know the length of the circle's diameter but we do not yet know the measure for the circle's circumference then all we have to do is divide the measure of the circle's diameter by 1.27201964951406 and the result will be 1 quarter of the circle's circumference. Multiply 1 quarter of the circle's circumference by 4 and obviously we have the value for the circumference of the circle. If we use 1.27201964951406 to get the length of the circle's diameter or the measure for the circle's circumference and then we divide the measure for the circle's circumference by the measure for the circle's diameter I guarantee you the result is 3.144605511029693.

The Kepler right triangle has so much wisdom encoded in it.
The Kepler right triangle is proof that 3.144605511029693 is the correct value for Pi.
3.141592653589793 as Pi has already been proven to be false by the aid of computer software that demonstrate that the curve of a circle can never be filled completely by polygons so the assumption that the gaps in the circle’s curve will disappear is false and thus proves that the multiple Polygon method for deriving a value of Pi is flawed because the multiple polygon method can only give us approximations for Pi while the Kepler right triangle gives us the exact value of Pi and that is 3.144605511029693. For example if the second longest edge length of a Kepler right triangle is the same length as the diameter of a circle then shortest edge length of the Kepler right triangle is equal to 1 quarter of the circle’s circumference. So if the shortest edge length of the Kepler right triangle is multiplied by 4 and the result divided by the second longest edge length while we use 1.27201964951406 then we can get the correct value of Pi and again that is 3.144605511029693. The Kepler right triangle is also the key to squaring the circle with equal perimeters and also equal areas. So almost anybody can get the right value of Pi by just constructing a Kepler right triangle and also a pocket calculator. Remember that the hypotenuse of a Kepler right triangle divided by the shortest edge length produces the Golden ratio of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.618033988749895, while the second longest edge length of a Kepler right triangle divided by the shortest edge length produces the square root of the Golden ratio 1.27201964951406.
Pi can be also be calculated from a Kepler right triangle if the measure for the perimeter of the square that is located on the shortest edge length of the Kepler right triangle is divided by the measure for the second longest edge length of the Kepler right triangle. Pi can also be gained if the measure of the perimeter of the square that is located on the second longest edge length of a Kepler right triangle is divided by the hypotenuse of the Kepler right triangle . Traditional Pi = 3.141 can also be gained from a Kepler right triangle that has a hypotenuse with a measure of 34 while the shortest edge length of this Kepler right triangle is 21 and the second longest edge length of the Kepler right triangle has a measure that is equal to the square root of 715. 34 and 21 are both numbers that can be found among the Fibonacci sequence that progresses towards the Golden ratio Phi of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.618033988749895 when any of the numbers that are next to each other in the Fibonacci sequence are divided by each other resulting in an approximation for the Golden ratio-Phi of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.618033988749895. 34 divided by 21 = 1.619047619047619. 1.619047619047619 is an approximation for the Golden ratio –Phi of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.618033988749895. 21 multiplied by 4 = 84. 84 divided by the square root of 715 = 3.141421886428416. 3.141421886428416 multiplied by the square root of 715 = 84. The real value of Pi = 3.144605511029… and can be gained from a Kepler right triangle that has a hypotenuse that has a measurement of 9227465, while the shortest edge length of this Kepler right triangle is 5702887 and the measurement for the second longest edge length of this Kepler right triangle is 7254184.3229584. 9227465 and 5702887 are numbers that are both featured among the Fibonacci sequence that moves towards the Golden ratio-Phi of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.618033988749895 when any of the numbers that are next to each other in the Fibonacci sequence are divided by each other resulting in an approximation for the Golden ratio-Phi of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.618033988749895. 9227465 divided by 5702887 = the Golden ratio-Phi of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.618033988749895. 5702887 multiplied by 4 = 22811548. 22811548 divided by 7254184.3229584 = 3.144605511029667. 3.144605511029667 multiplied by 7254184.3229584 = 22811548. 3.144605511029…….. is the true real value of Pi.
https://houseoftruth.education/en/teaching/mona-lisa/theorem-5-kepler-triangle-in-the-great-pyramid
https://www.goldennumber.net/triangles/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Kepler_Triangle_Construction.svg
https://m.facebook.com/TheRealNumberPi/
www.measuringpisquaringphi.com
Download for free and keep and read The book of Phi volume 8: The true value of Pi = 3.144, by Mathematician and author Jain 108: https://lists.gnu.org/archive/html/help-octave/2016-07/pdf1s8_jmqrL6.pdf


0 Replies
 
Liddz
 
  0  
Reply Thu 1 Mar, 2018 06:28 pm
@Quehoniaomath,
To get the correct measure for a circle’s diameter and to prove that Golden Pi = 3.144605511029693 is the true value of Pi by applying the Pythagorean theorem to all the edges of a Kepler right triangle when using the second longest edge length of a Kepler right triangle as the diameter of a circle then the shortest edge length of a Kepler right triangle is equal in measure to 1 quarter of a circle’s circumference. Also if the radius of a circle is used as the second longest edge length of a Kepler right triangle then the shortest edge length of a Kepler right triangle is equal to one 8th of a circle’s circumference:


Example 1:
The circumference of the circle is 12 but the measure for the diameter of the circle is not yet known. The second longest edge length of a Kepler right triangle is used as the diameter of a circle in this example. 12 divided by 4 is 3 so the shortest edge length of the Kepler right triangle is 3. The hypotenuse of a Kepler right triangle divided by the shortest edge length of a Kepler right triangle produces the Golden ratio of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.61803398874989.
According to the Pythagorean theorem the hypotenuse of any right triangle contains the sum of both the squares on the 2 other edges of the right triangle.

So the shortest edge length of the Kepler right triangle is 3 and since the ratio gained from dividing the hypotenuse of a Kepler right triangle by the measure for the shortest edge of the Kepler right triangle is the Golden ratio of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.61803398874989 then the measure for the hypotenuse of a Kepler right triangle that has its shortest edge length as 3 is 4.85410196624967. 4.85410196624967 divided by 3 is the Golden ratio of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.61803398874989.
4.85410196624967 squared is 23.562305898748912.
3 squared is 9.
23.562305898748912 subtract 9 = 14.562305898748912.
The square root of 14.562305898748912 is 3.816058948542188.
Remember that the second longest edge length of the Kepler right triangle is used as the diameter of a circle. So the measure for both the second longest edge length of this Kepler right triangle and the diameter of the circle is 3.816058948542188. Remember that the shortest edge length of this Kepler right triangle is 3 and is equal to 1 quarter of a circle’s circumference that has a measure of 12 equal units.
Circumference of circle is 12
Diameter of circle is 3.816058948542188.
12 divided by 3.816058948542188 = 3.144605511029709. So Golden Pi = 3.144605511029709 is the true value of Pi.
Example 2:
The circumference of the circle is 45623096 but the measure for the diameter of the circle is not yet known. The second longest edge length of a Kepler right triangle is used as the radius of a circle in this example. 45623096 divided by 8 is 5702887 so the shortest edge length of the Kepler right triangle is 5702887. The hypotenuse of a Kepler right triangle divided by the shortest edge length of a Kepler right triangle produces the Golden ratio of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.61803398874989.
According to the Pythagorean theorem the hypotenuse of any right triangle contains the sum of both the squares on the 2 other edges of the right triangle.

So the shortest edge length of the Kepler right triangle is 5702887 and since the ratio gained from dividing the hypotenuse of a Kepler right triangle by the measure for the shortest edge of the Kepler right triangle is the Golden ratio of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.61803398874989 then the measure for the hypotenuse of a Kepler right triangle that has its shortest edge length as 5702887 is 9227465. 9227465 divided by 5702887 is the Golden ratio of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.61803398874989.
9227465 squared is 85146110326225.
5702887 squared is 32522920134769.
85146110326225 subtract 32522920134769 = 52623190191456.
The square root of 52623190191456 = 7254184.32295844.
Remember that the second longest edge length of the Kepler right triangle is used as the radius of a circle. So the measure for both the second longest edge length of this Kepler right triangle and the radius of the circle is 7254184.32295844. Remember that the shortest edge length of this Kepler right triangle is 5702887 and is equal to one 8th of a circle’s circumference that has a measure of 45623096 equal units.
Circumference of circle is 45623096.
Radius of circle is 7254184.32295844.
Radius of circle is 7254184.32295844 and multiplied by 2 = 14508368.64591688.
Diameter of circle = 14508368.64591688.
45623096 divided by 14508368.64591688 = 3.14460551102965. So Golden Pi = 3.14460551102965 is the true value of Pi.
Example 3:
The circumference of the circle is 8 but the measure for the diameter of the circle is not yet known. The second longest edge length of a Kepler right triangle is used as the radius of a circle in this example. 8 divided by 8 is 1 so the shortest edge length of the Kepler right triangle is 1. The hypotenuse of a Kepler right triangle divided by the shortest edge length of a Kepler right triangle produces the Golden ratio of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.61803398874989.
According to the Pythagorean theorem the hypotenuse of any right triangle contains the sum of both the squares on the 2 other edges of the right triangle.

So the shortest edge length of the Kepler right triangle is 1 and since the ratio gained from dividing the hypotenuse of a Kepler right triangle by the measure for the shortest edge of the Kepler right triangle is the Golden ratio of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.61803398874989 then the measure for the hypotenuse of a Kepler right triangle that has its shortest edge length as 1 is 1.61803398874989. 1.61803398874989 divided by 1 is the Golden ratio of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.61803398874989.
1.61803398874989 squared is 2.61803398874989.
1 squared is 1.
2.61803398874989 subtract 1 = 1.61803398874989.
The square root of 1.61803398874989 = 1.27201964951406.
Remember that the second longest edge length of the Kepler right triangle is used as the radius of a circle. So the measure for both the second longest edge length of this Kepler right triangle and the radius of the circle is 1.27201964951406. Remember that the shortest edge length of this Kepler right triangle is 1 and is equal to one 8th of a circle’s circumference that has a measure of 8 equal units.
Circumference of circle is 8.
Radius of circle is 1.27201964951406.
Radius of circle is 1.27201964951406 and multiplied by 2 = 2.54403929902812.
Diameter of circle = 2.54403929902812.
8 divided by 2.54403929902812 = 3.144605511029715. So Golden Pi = 3.144605511029715 is the true value of Pi.

Example 4:
The edge of the square is the second longest edge length of a Kepler right triangle.
The diameter of the circle is the hypotenuse of a Kepler right triangle.
The width and edge of the square in this example is 12 so both the perimeter of the square and the circumference of the circle have a measure of 48. 12 multiplied by 4 = 48. If the second longest edge length of a Kepler right triangle is divided by the shortest edge length of the Kepler right triangle then the result is the square root of the Golden ratio = 1.272019649514069. If the hypotenuse of a Kepler right triangle is divided by the shortest edge length of a Kepler right triangle the result is the Golden ratio of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.61803398874989. The edge of the square is the second longest edge length of a Kepler right triangle and the width and edge of the square is 12. The second longest edge length of this Kepler right triangle is known to be 12 but the measure for both the shortest edge length of this Kepler right triangle and also the hypotenuse of this Kepler right triangle are not yet known. The measure for the shortest edge length of the Kepler right triangle can be known if the second longest edge length of the Kepler right triangle is divided by the square root of the Golden ratio = 1.272019649514069. The measure for both the width of the square and the second longest edge length of the Kepler right triangle is 12. 12 divided by the square root of the Golden ratio = 1.27201964951406 = 9.433816533089079. The shortest edge length of the Kepler right triangle in this example is 9.433816533089079. Apply the Pythagorean theorem to all the edges of this Kepler right triangle to discover the measure for the hypotenuse of a Kepler right triangle that has its second longest edge length as 12 while the shortest edge length of this Kepler right triangle is 9.433816533089079.
12 squared = 144.
9.433816533089079 squared = 88.996894379984853.
144 plus 88.996894379984853 = 232.996894379984853.
The square root of 232.996894379984853 = 15.26423579416883.
15.26423579416883 divided by 9.433816533089079 = The Golden ratio of Cosine (36) multiplied by 2 = 1.618033988749895.
The hypotenuse of a Kepler right triangle that has its second longest edge length as 12 while the shortest edge length of this Kepler right triangle is equal to 9.433816533089079 is 15.26423579416883.
The diameter of a circle with a circumference of 48 is 15.26423579416883.
48 divided by 15.26423579416883 = Golden Pi = 3.144605511029693.
0 Replies
 
 

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