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Mexican salsa.

 
 
Reply Tue 8 Jul, 2014 04:17 pm
I will like to share a small simple and delicious recipe. I hope you like it.

The basic mexican salsa:

4 small tomatoes, 2 to 4 serrano peppers, 1 small onion, 2 to 6 cilantro branches, water.

Put the tomatoes serrano pepper and the onion, on a pot with water (the vegetables should not be completely submerged leave at least the tops over the water line). Let them boil on medium fire approx 10 minutes or until they are well cooked.

You know if it will be spicy because the peppers will start to free capsaisin making it imposible to breath on the kitchen. If you are a brave person keep it that way, if you are not add more tomatoes.

Once everything is cooked put everything on a molcajete (mortar and pestile) or in a blender. Add cilantro, 50 cc to 100 cc of water (or depending in how heavy you want it. Blend everything and it wll be battle ready
 
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Tue 8 Jul, 2014 05:44 pm
@luismtzzz,
That sounds goooooooodddddd.
luismtzzz
 
  3  
Reply Tue 8 Jul, 2014 05:46 pm
@jespah,
Sneazing and beady eyes are a good sign of god damn hot salsa.

You can substitute serrano pepper with jalapeños if you do not want a very hot salsa.

(Any mexican can tell jalapeños are not actually hot peppers for us)
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Jul, 2014 06:55 pm
@luismtzzz,
I'll be BACK.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Jul, 2014 06:57 pm
@ossobuco,
I was kidding but also will be back.
0 Replies
 
luismtzzz
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Jul, 2014 06:58 pm
@ossobuco,
What is BALK?
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Jul, 2014 06:59 pm
@luismtzzz,
A misspelling by me. Read the next version... back.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 8 Jul, 2014 07:00 pm
@luismtzzz,
Even to me. The time I had trouble was at a hunan restaurant, probably mild for them as it was at a restaurant in Los Angeles.

A city of learners.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Wed 9 Jul, 2014 05:49 am
@luismtzzz,
I have cousins in el Ciudad de México and they report the same. Smile
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Wed 9 Jul, 2014 06:18 am
@luismtzzz,
sounds good - this is the first I have seen where you cook the tomatoes - I have made similar salsa but also made it fresh without cooking. I'd imagine this allows it so the peppers make the salsa really hot (as in spicy hot).
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 12:35 pm
@luismtzzz,
I just saved your salsa recipe for my cooking files, Luis.
The difficult thing is to find really good garden tomatoes.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 18 Jul, 2014 04:13 pm
@ossobuco,
So, I have a new ripe mango to play with, and have looked up recipes for mango salsa.

Here's one:
http://allrecipes.com/recipe/mango-salsa/

Well, right away I have to make substitutions, so, this will be an odd test.
My substitutions, given what I have one hand, are in red.


Ingredients

1 mango - peeled, seeded, and chopped
1/4 cup finely chopped red bell pepper/green pepper previously sauteed in olive oil with med hot chile powder, salt and black pepper
1 green onion, chopped/some previously caramelized chopped brown onions
2 tablespoons chopped cilantro/dried cilantro leaves, using less because they're dried
1 fresh jalapeno chile pepper, finely chopped/one pickled jalapeno, only have dried peppers of different types on hand right now
2 tablespoons lime juice/no lemon or lime today/ adding juice of one orange.
1 tablespoon lemon juice, see lime above

Directions

In a medium bowl, mix mango, red bell pepper, green onion, cilantro, jalapeno, lime juice, and lemon juice. Cover, and allow to sit at least 30 minutes before serving.



This might be a lost cause new mexican salsa. We'll see.

edit - there's a recipe I googled that involves a lot more ingredients, and the pepper is habanero. Another time but on my list.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Jul, 2014 03:34 pm
@ossobuco,
This turned out oddly good, despite all my substitutions. I'm going to add a little chopped fresh nectarine to it.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 04:05 pm
That's a good basic recipe, Luiz.

I prefer to roast the vegetables instead, though, on a grate right on top of a gas cooktop.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 04:21 pm
@Linkat,
Linkat wrote:

sounds good - this is the first I have seen where you cook the tomatoes - I have made similar salsa but also made it fresh without cooking. I'd imagine this allows it so the peppers make the salsa really hot (as in spicy hot).


I was thinking the same thing. I thought salsa was raw. Hmmm....I guess I'm thinking of pico de gallo.
I guess it makes sense to cook the tomatoes to get the skin off them.

There's this salsa called "Roses Just Right Salsa" that I used to love. It was fresh in the refrigerator section at the store. They made red and verde. They were a small, Mexican family owned company. Then they sold out to a bigger company and it's just not the same.

I guess if you never had it before you'd like it, but somethings just missing for me.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 04:31 pm
@Linkat,
Linkat wrote:

sounds good - this is the first I have seen where you cook the tomatoes - I have made similar salsa but also made it fresh without cooking. I'd imagine this allows it so the peppers make the salsa really hot (as in spicy hot).


Are you sure you're not thinking of pico de gallo?
luismtzzz
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 04:58 pm
@roger,
Actually, no. Pico de gallo is a completeely different dressing. The first main difference is that all the ingredient are raw.

The bascs are, serrano pepper, onion, and tomato. Everything sliced in small cubes and mixed. It is supposed to ressemble the mexican flg colors (green white and red).

Varieties are common. I was taught to add lemon juice (prefferntly arab lemon which BTW is the most common variety used on Mexican cousine), cilantro and olive oil. It becames tastier.
0 Replies
 
luismtzzz
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 05:09 pm
@chai2,
Yes salsas can be made with the ingredients raw. The same basic recipe. But honestly i preffer when they are cooked or even roasted.

There is a variety called "Tatemada" (i do not know the correct translation). You boil your ingredients with few water so the skin of the vegetable becames scorched gaining a black stains. Then when you mash everything the salsa gets a more brownish color.

A good raw version is made with jalapeño pepper. Ingredients are all green jalapeño, vinager, and cilantro.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Aug, 2014 05:34 pm
@luismtzzz,
uh huh, I've had that. Muy Bueno.

http://gwiv.com/Zaragoza5.jpg
0 Replies
 
Linkat
 
  2  
Reply Mon 11 Aug, 2014 10:06 am
@roger,
The recipe I had/use was called tomato salsa or similar - but it was definately called salsa not pico de gallo. From a William Sonoma Mexican cook book.
0 Replies
 
 

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