12
   

It's official: Germans can't pronounce "squirrel"

 
 
Reply Thu 12 Jun, 2014 10:57 am
It's true!

  • Topic Stats
  • Top Replies
  • Link to this Topic
Type: Discussion • Score: 12 • Views: 2,552 • Replies: 20

 
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Jun, 2014 11:17 am
@joefromchicago,
We've been playing the squirrel game with my French sis in law for donkey's years.
The nearest she's ever got was "squi-roo-elle".
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Thu 12 Jun, 2014 11:23 am
D Lowan tells a really funny story about seeing a squirrel for the first time in Washington Square Park, and asking a policeman what it was. Neither she nor her companion (also Australian) were able to decipher what he was saying. After he spelled it for them, they still couldn't link up his pronunciation to the word--that at least, is how i recall her story.
0 Replies
 
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Jun, 2014 11:24 am
@Lordyaswas,
Lordyaswas wrote:

We've been playing the squirrel game with my French sis in law for donkey's years.
The nearest she's ever got was "squi-roo-elle".

Your compatriot Izzie thinks Americans say "squirrel" funny. Or, at least, she thinks I say it funny.
Lordyaswas
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Jun, 2014 11:29 am
@joefromchicago,
I've often heard laboratory and alluminium sound funny, but I don't think I've ever heard an American say squirrel.
I have a Bostonian friend who I can get to say it next time we meet, will he be representative of the majority, or do they talk more like a Canadian, as I often tell him.
joefromchicago
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 Jun, 2014 11:51 am
@Lordyaswas,
Bostonians aren't representative of Americans. They call squirrels "tree rabbits."
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  2  
Reply Thu 12 Jun, 2014 12:23 pm
mark
contrex
 
  2  
Reply Thu 12 Jun, 2014 12:48 pm
I knew an American (New England upper crust) who couldn't say "mirror" or "curry", it seemed to me. To my ear she was saying "meer" and "kirry".
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  2  
Reply Thu 12 Jun, 2014 01:21 pm
Japanese can't say the "l" sound I thought? Irish may not be able to say the "th" sound. And, Americans that do not speak German cannot pronounce "Chanukah" with the correct guttural "Ch" sound, so Chanukah has become Hanukah for Americans. Spanish speakers in the U.S. will add an "es" for pluralizing words (like in Spanish), so "test" becomes "testes." Not exactly like the English word "testes," since is sounds like two words - "test" and "es."

Sturgis
 
  2  
Reply Thu 12 Jun, 2014 01:38 pm
I always tought it wuz pronownced SKWOI-EL. Den agen I wuz parshelly razed in da village and udder condfines of NYC.

translation for those what need it: I always thought it was pronounced 'squir-El. Then again I was partially raised in the Village and other confines of NYC.
Foofie
 
  2  
Reply Fri 13 Jun, 2014 11:14 am
@Sturgis,
Sturgis wrote:

I always tought it wuz pronownced SKWOI-EL. Den agen I wuz parshelly razed in da village and udder condfines of NYC.

translation for those what need it: I always thought it was pronounced 'squir-El. Then again I was partially raised in the Village and other confines of NYC.


I read somewhere, decades ago, that the New Yorkese/Brooklynese of "deese, dem, and dose" (these, them and those) reflects the Irish not pronouncing "th's"?

They were once one-third of New Yorkers in the first half of the 20th century.
0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  2  
Reply Fri 13 Jun, 2014 11:25 am
@Sturgis,
Sturgis wrote:

I always tought it wuz pronownced SKWOI-EL. Den agen I wuz parshelly razed in da village and udder condfines of NYC.

translation for those what need it: I always thought it was pronounced 'squir-El. Then again I was partially raised in the Village and other confines of NYC.


Stoigis, You're taking the oi Noo Yawk sound a bit too far. Even my parents said "squirrel." "Roboida, look at the squirrel."
0 Replies
 
contrex
 
  3  
Reply Fri 13 Jun, 2014 11:35 am
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:
"Chanukah" with the correct guttural "Ch" sound, so Chanukah has become Hanukah for Americans.


I impressed my (beer-drinking, pork-eating, very relaxed) Muslim colleague when I said "Halal" properly.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Jun, 2014 12:27 pm
One of my first bacteriology professors was English, and he taught us to iss'-oh-late bacteria. I remember being slightly shocked. Generally, you know, we eye'-so-lated them.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 13 Jun, 2014 01:03 pm
@joefromchicago,
But you certainly can still say Oachkatzl (or perhaps Oachkatzal)or Sciurus vulgaris) as heard in your Wiana Zeit Wink

But honestly: Skippy the squirrel is a story in an English schoolbook used in primary school.
http://i1334.photobucket.com/albums/w641/Walter_Hinteler/a_zps22ca02e6.jpghttp://i1334.photobucket.com/albums/w641/Walter_Hinteler/b_zps4f0ffb97.jpg
joefromchicago
 
  2  
Reply Fri 13 Jun, 2014 01:55 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
I could never understand what those crazy Wieners were saying. I can, however, pronounce "Eichhörnchen."

Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Fri 13 Jun, 2014 02:54 pm
@joefromchicago,
joefromchicago wrote:

I could never understand what those crazy Wieners were saying.
My closest relatives are Wieners. They are polite and talk "high German" with us, which sounds like Bavarian. (They don't know what an Eichhörnchen is.)
0 Replies
 
bobsal u1553115
 
  0  
Reply Sun 15 Jun, 2014 03:19 pm
@InfraBlue,
Quote:
mark


Thats what my dog says. "Mark, mark, mark!" He has a cleft palate.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Jun, 2014 03:47 pm
@Foofie,
Foofie wrote:

Japanese can't say the "l" sound I thought? Irish may not be able to say the "th" sound. And, Americans that do not speak German cannot pronounce "Chanukah" with the correct guttural "Ch" sound, so Chanukah has become Hanukah for Americans. Spanish speakers in the U.S. will add an "es" for pluralizing words (like in Spanish), so "test" becomes "testes." Not exactly like the English word "testes," since is sounds like two words - "test" and "es."
How do the Spanish pronounce "Chanukah" ?
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Jun, 2014 11:13 pm
@OmSigDAVID,
OmSigDAVID wrote:
How do the Spanish pronounce "Chanukah" ?
[/quote]In Catalan it's "Hanukkà". In Galician it's "Hanuka". It really would be interesting to know what it's in Basque .... and plus the various pronunciations in the various Spanish languages and dialects.
 

Related Topics

There is a word for that! - Discussion by wandeljw
Best Euphemism for death and dying.... - Discussion by tsarstepan
Let pupils abandon spelling rules, says academic - Discussion by Robert Gentel
Help me!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! - Question by lululucy
phrase/name of male seducer - Question by Zah03
Shameful sexist languge must be banned! - Question by neologist
Three Word Phrase I REALLY Hate to See - Discussion by hawkeye10
Is History an art or a science? - Question by Olivier5
"Rooms" in a cave - Question by shua
 
  1. Forums
  2. » It's official: Germans can't pronounce "squirrel"
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.26 seconds on 04/21/2021 at 08:39:55