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How We(The US) Can Still Win The War With Drugs

 
 
JLO1988
 
  1  
Wed 26 Feb, 2014 03:00 pm
@JLO1988,
@OmgsiDAVID

Regardless the origins of anti-drug laws, we did not understand them well enough back when prohibitions were beginning for them to be legal. Our 'consumer' capitalist structure still does not allow them to be legal for fear they would become bigger burdens than the ills of alcohol and tobacco, a sound concern. Rather than evolve our economic system or criminal justice system we have begun building drug awareness and prevention efforts into our educational systems though many of them are still misguided. With drug courts and better drug education of professionals in our justice system we're making efforts.

Medical marijuana is a clear slippery slope to the re-categorization of marijuana as a scheduled I drug (not having any medical benefits) which will also call into question other aspects of the drug war as the implications of this revelation will resonate. The progress that has been made in health sciences, the psychological understanding of addiction, as well as pharmacological breakthroughs that have gone largely unexplored for economic reasons means that we can approach the realities of recreational drug use with perspective. Prohibition has never worked throughout history and in this information age it's a shame we've allowed it to continue for as long as it has.

One of the most ironic things about medical marijuana is that, since marijuana has been shown in repeated research that it reduces the formation of cancer in lung cells exposed to cigarette tobacco, being a cigarette smoker is license to get a prescription for medical marijuana.
0 Replies
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  1  
Wed 26 Feb, 2014 03:09 pm
If drugs were legalised, would it be a good or bad thing?
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Wed 26 Feb, 2014 03:16 pm
Quote:
How We(The US) Can Still Win The War With Drugs
WINNING the Drug War shud be defined
as the citizenry, the electorate, defeating its low-life hireling
and RE-instituting the right to access to self destructive materials.

Government was never granted jurisdiction to interfere in that.





David
JLO1988
 
  1  
Thu 27 Feb, 2014 03:11 pm
Blanket legality of illicit substances in a consumer based economy like our own will create social and health issues in par with alcohol and tobacco. What we need is regulated legality and decriminalization with the government controlling demand as well as cost through sophisticated methods of manufacturing making competition obsolete.

To put this vision another way, through multi-billion dollar research, development, testing, manufacturing efforts our government would manufacture so much pure cocaine, heroine, marijuana(already started), and other chemicals that they have a manufacturing monopoly on the source chemicals.

There are multiple benefits to this, one is that we can control who sells illicit substances as it will be seeming impossible to profit off of them without getting them cheaply as the distributors will also be selling them for a fraction of what is now paid on the black market. Through the creation and regulation of merchants we can usher these and future recreational drugs into society. We can learn from the mistakes that we've allowed to occur with the rabid advertising of legal and prescription drugs by preventing more dangers from being blindly set loose upon our economy. More importantly, it will end the war which began when people tried to solve an issue they didn't know enough about because now we've had the time to cleanse our ignorance.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Thu 27 Feb, 2014 03:24 pm
The USA needs this phony war on drugs to finance any terrorist actions that Congress won't fund.
0 Replies
 
Krumple
 
  1  
Sat 12 Apr, 2014 10:11 pm
@JLO1988,
I have a new concern. I have long since realized that drugs are not the problem and never have been. They should be legalized period, no further discussion. But that is not my concern. What I am worried about now, which could be nothing more than paranoia and I hope that it is. Are the massive drug cartels in mexico.

They need the US laws against drugs. They have so much money amassed now that they could buy off US political leaders if they were ever to consider legalizing all drugs. You see these massive drug cartels want drugs to be illegal because they make more money. If drugs were legalized they would lose out on billions of dollars a year due to competition and US derived competitors.

We may never see what SHOULD be done because those who now have money and power can dictate to the rest of the world and continue to turn the US into a second mexico.

JLO1988
 
  1  
Tue 3 Jun, 2014 01:53 pm
@Krumple,
Since I posted this I was made aware of a video that... Well, quite frankly you may not possess the psychological stability to view this (I say that mostly for dramatic affect).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1AH10Sop4Q

What this link is: A national security analyst for over 35 years for the united states interviewed the highest ranking defector from any communist regime during or following the cold war (not 100% on all details). The facts have been checked that this high ranking communist diplomat shared with Mr. Douglas which detailed specific examples that clearly illustrate how every level of government throughout the world has been compromised.

I know what you are saying but have faith my friend. Those cartels, dealers, users, and corrupt officials who are fighting against the system we must believe are doing it for more than money. While money may be the motivating factor for the risk these people take, the human individual is more complex than we often give ourselves credit for, and this is true even in the most corrupt of human souls.

If the American civil war taught us anything, if the homosexual struggle for government assistance during the AIDS epidemic taught us anything, if there is ever a need for violent revolution it's to war against those who have used the dangers of drugs as a tool for cultural 'purity.' Indeed, I am saying that I look up to the drug cartels of Mexico, furthermore, your fears have already been realized many years ago my friend.

Jason O'Hara
JLO1988
 
  1  
Tue 3 Jun, 2014 02:05 pm
@JLO1988,
@Krumple

You may find this video reassuring if you have not seen it already (has like 1.6million hits)

http://www.ted.com/talks/rodrigo_canales_the_deadly_genius_of_drug_cartels

P.S. Please share Joseph D. Douglas Battle Lines video, this is the kind of history that gets erased.
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Tue 3 Jun, 2014 03:47 pm
mark
JLO1988
 
  1  
Tue 3 Jun, 2014 04:23 pm
@InfraBlue,
Are you saying that I'm a mark? Please elaborate on what you mean by this or if you only accidentally posted.

Luckily, as a writer and free thinker I have no reason to fear the loss of physical existence. My ideas are a part of my soul and my words are a part of my body. While it would be a shame to lose the current human incarnation of what my future holds by dying a martyr for a cause such as ending an unjust war, I rest assured that the energy I manifest through writing and exercising my mind would manifest itself in another form.

Such a form could be a political movement, another person saying the same things with just as much anger, or merely the flapping of a butterfly's wings. Beyond all that metaphysical strength, I will grow my words with the paper ashes of dead trees until such a day should come.

But why worry about all that? Worrying only illustrates that you know nothing about the true nature in the evils fought against the state nor those perpetrated by the state from within it. Not you personally; you, as a member of an audience.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Tue 3 Jun, 2014 04:27 pm
The war on drugs like the war on alcohol doesn't work. The war on drugs just proved the discrimination against blacks; they served more prison time for the same or worse drug crimes of whites. Putting them in prison just cost society more without solving the problems.

0 Replies
 
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Tue 3 Jun, 2014 04:33 pm
@JLO1988,
JLO1988 wrote:

Are you saying that I'm a mark? Please elaborate on what you mean by this or if you only accidentally posted.

Luckily, as a writer and free thinker I have no reason to fear the loss of physical existence. My ideas are a part of my soul and my words are a part of my body. While it would be a shame to lose the current human incarnation of what my future holds by dying a martyr for a cause such as ending an unjust war, I rest assured that the energy I manifest through writing and exercising my mind would manifest itself in another form.

Such a form could be a political movement, another person saying the same things with just as much anger, or merely the flapping of a butterfly's wings. Beyond all that metaphysical strength, I will grow my words with the paper ashes of dead trees until such a day should come.

But why worry about all that? Worrying only illustrates that you know nothing about the true nature in the evils fought against the state nor those perpetrated by the state from within it. Not you personally; you, as a member of an audience.


Chill, JLO.

Blue was just marking the thread in order to follow it.
Debra Law
 
  1  
Wed 4 Jun, 2014 02:32 am
@rosborne979,
I agree rosborne979, except I would use the term "decriminalize" instead of "legalize".
Frank Apisa
 
  1  
Wed 4 Jun, 2014 02:51 am
@Debra Law,
Debra Law wrote:

I agree rosborne979, except I would use the term "decriminalize" instead of "legalize".


"Decriminalize" is the correct term.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Wed 4 Jun, 2014 03:00 am
@JLO1988,

JLO1988 wrote:

Indeed, I am saying that I look up to the drug cartels of Mexico, furthermore, your fears have already been realized many years ago my friend.

Jason O'Hara


I guess everybody has to have something to be proud of.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Wed 4 Jun, 2014 04:14 am
@Debra Law,
Agreed
JLO1988
 
  1  
Wed 4 Jun, 2014 02:08 pm
@Frank Apisa,
Hahahah, well I thought it was kinda humorous. What I was saying was really directed at the Krumple who posted some worrysome thoughts regarding the drug cartels.
JLO1988
 
  0  
Wed 4 Jun, 2014 02:15 pm
@rosborne979,
Why do you try to start a subconversation when I answered the question about decriminalization and legalization...

Decriminalization is a step towards the kind of regulated, legalized recreational substances that I believe is inevitable. We don't want currently illicit substances to go the route of alcohol and tobacco; if there is any part of the drug war I agree with it's how it has prevented this from occurring.

The kind of regulation we need I describe pretty thoroughly in the essay at the beginning of this thread. The government can create a single multi-billion dollar manufacturing center to have a monopoly on supplying distributors. To prevent them from turning into alcohol and tobacco but allowing them to have brands we limit the advertising to the branding of different products. No traditional advertisements, the only advertisements for recreational drugs (including alcohol and tobacco products) should be in the product container itself, beyond the shelf advertisement of having different brands there should be none.
Frank Apisa
 
  2  
Wed 4 Jun, 2014 02:46 pm
@JLO1988,
JLO1988 wrote:

Hahahah, well I thought it was kinda humorous. What I was saying was really directed at the Krumple who posted some worrysome thoughts regarding the drug cartels.


No problemo, JLO.

I have argued publicly against the "drug war" for many years...long before it became a safer thing to do.

Back in 1989 I had an op ed sized piece in the NY Times taking on the (at that time) unpopular issue.

In 1995 I wrote an op ed piece for New Jersey's largest newspaper, The Star Ledger..where I flat out said I used marijuana (I was recovering from cancer) and that I thought the laws against its use, particularly for medical usage, were absurd.

In those days, that was thought to be very dangerous...but I did it.

We are on the same page.


0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  2  
Wed 4 Jun, 2014 07:56 pm
@JLO1988,
JLO1988 wrote:
Decriminalization is a step towards the kind of regulated, legalized recreational substances that I believe is inevitable. We don't want currently illicit substances to go the route of alcohol and tobacco...

Yes, we do want them to go the route of alcohol and tobacco, because ultimately that is the only way to prevent the same failures from occurring again and again and again. People must be allowed the right to do whatever they want to themselves in their own homes, and in my opinion that includes killing themselves with bad choices. There are a myriad of reasons why we will never be able to legislate people's private personal behavior and choices. The only thing that type of legislation is ever going to produce is a black market to bypass the restrictions. People are still going to do whatever they want to do (just as they are now). We need to stop trying to control people's personal choices and behaviors through legislation.
0 Replies
 
 

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