25
   

I'm annoyed with "reached out"

 
 
JTT
 
  -2  
Reply Sat 23 Nov, 2013 10:29 pm
@Roberta,
Quote:
The latest thing that's driving me nuts is, "That said." I deleted it at least fifty times from a book I recently edited.


Quote:
The legislators of "correct English," in fact, are an informal network of copy-editors, dictionary usage panelists, style manual writers, English teachers, essayists, and pundits. Their authority, they claim, comes from their dedication to implementing standards that have served the language well in the past, especially in the prose of its finest writers, and that maximize its clarity, logic, consistency, elegance, precision, stability, and expressive range. William Safire, who writes the weekly column "On Language" for the [New York Times Magazine], calls himself a "language maven," from the Yiddish word meaning expert, and this gives us a convenient label for the entire group.

To whom I say: Maven, shmaven! [Kibbitzers] and [nudniks] is more like it.

http://pinker.wjh.harvard.edu/articles/media/1994_01_24_thenewrepublic.html
0 Replies
 
Lordyaswas
 
  3  
Reply Sun 24 Nov, 2013 10:51 am
I'm reaching out to you, weird spam guy.
0 Replies
 
firefly
 
  4  
Reply Sun 24 Nov, 2013 11:23 am
Maybe we should blame AT & T or Marshall McLuan for it all...
Quote:
REACH OUT. REACH OUT AND TOUCH SOMEONE

N.W. Ayer, one of America's oldest advertising agencies, needed a creative approach to help AT&T soften its image in the face of growing concerns about AT&T's potential monopoly. So Ken D'Ambrosio helped develop the concept for a print and TV campaign that incorporated the now famous "Reach Out and Touch Someone" tag line. We can credit Marshall McLuhan for creating the tagline "Reach out and touch someone" for Ma Bell. This campaign was designed to soften AT&T's image and position the company as an indispensable element of everyday American life.

Michael Arlen devoted a book to the making of a 30-second commercial for [the Bell System] with the slogan "Reach out and touch someone".

"In thirty seconds, everybody notices everything" (Arlen, 1980: p. 211) stated Jerry Pfiffner, who was an executive vice-president of N.W. Ayer and leader of a Creative Group. They had designed the famous "Reach Out and Touch Someone" commercial advertising for AT&T's advertising campaign in 1979. The intention was to get more people to make long distance calls. The first commercial debuted on Johnny Carson's The Tonight Show...

"It's one of the great slogans of all advertising," said Neve Savage, vice president of marketing and communications for AT&T Wireless.
http://www.beatriceco.com/bti/porticus/bell/bellsystem_ads-1.html



JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 25 Nov, 2013 01:00 pm
@firefly,
Maybe you should note that this use isn't the use Boomer was complaining about, FF.

Quote:
Maybe we should blame AT & T or Marshall McLuan for it all...


Yeah, that makes perfect sense, FF. Blame the only individuals who create all the English that has ever existed or will likely exist, the very people who use it.

0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 25 Nov, 2013 07:26 pm
@boomerang,
Quote:
I just watched a news bit where the journalist "reached out to Costco....".

To me "reached out" implies trying to help someone.


Wasn't there any more context than that, Boomer? Tho' 'reaching out' is not really the medias' main mode of operation, I guess there could be such a scenario arise.
JTT
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 25 Nov, 2013 07:29 pm
@firefly,
Quote:
It's not as grammatically incorrect as some of the others.


These word/phrase issues have nothing to do with grammaticality, FF.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Mon 25 Nov, 2013 07:41 pm
@JTT,
They "reached out" to Costco to ask them why they were labeling Bibles as fiction.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 25 Nov, 2013 07:41 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:
The longtime hate I've got is for "take a decision". Who had your decision before you took it? It's one of the few language things that can actually make me drop an f bomb.


Google exact phrase search

"take a decision"

About 18,400,000 results (0.93 seconds)
JTT
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 25 Nov, 2013 07:49 pm
@JTT,
As opposed to,

About 27,900,000 results (0.37 seconds)

for

"make a decision".
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Tue 26 Nov, 2013 07:40 pm
@ehBeth,
Quote:
The longtime hate I've got is for "take a decision". ... It's one of the few language things that can actually make me drop an f bomb.


There are so many words in the English language and so many of those words have multiple meanings. How can a body be expected to know them all?

So don't you think it wise to maybe do something radical, Beth, like say, check a dictionary, before you drop a dud?

Quote:
Who had your decision before you took it?


Pretty dumb reasoning, Beth. Have you ever 'taken a rest'? Did someone have your 'rest' before you used it?

You might want to suggest the same to Setanta on 'iconic' so that he doesn't embarrass himself anymore.

Quote:


http://education.yahoo.com/reference/dictionary/entry/take

23. To undertake, make, or perform: take a walk; take a decision.


Quote:

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/take

c (1) : to bind oneself by <take the oath of office> (2) : to make (a decision) especially with finality or authority

0 Replies
 
McTag
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Nov, 2013 03:12 am

More peeves! Never a bad thing.

Here (UK) at the moment, on TV news and comment, every investigation has to be "robust". You's be amazed how many "robust" investigations can be called for in a week (a long time in politics).
0 Replies
 
RichInSoquel
 
  3  
Reply Mon 11 Mar, 2019 01:15 pm
In the recently released transcript of Bruce Ohr's testimony before the House
Committee on the Judiciary and the House Committee on Oversight
and Government Reform, there are
--11 instances of "reach out"
-- 6 instances of "reaching out"
-- 15 instances of "reached out"

I'm annoyed by each and every one.
0 Replies
 
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Mon 11 Mar, 2019 04:11 pm
It annoys me how everyone, but especially children, are so “brave” when anything at all happens.

It’s gotten to where if you miss a bus, you bravely wait for the next on. Or in the case of a kid, if they did the now unheard of thing and walked to school.
0 Replies
 
VikramSidhu
 
  0  
Reply Sat 13 Apr, 2019 12:14 am
@boomerang,
They've been beating "iconic" to death, too--it has become meaningless thanks to "journalists."
farmerman
 
  3  
Reply Sat 13 Apr, 2019 02:57 am
@VikramSidhu,
I dont much listen to news programs, as they usualy get it wrong .HOWEVER, when I read something I keep Elmore LEonards rules of writing in mind. They are my only ruls of good writing ven though I follow them not.

1. Never open a book with weather:
If it’s only to create atmosphere, and not a character’s reaction to the weather, you don’t want to go on too long. The reader is apt to leaf ahead looking for people.



2. Avoid prologues:
They can be annoying, especially a prologue following an introduction that comes after a foreword.



3. Never use a verb other than “said” to carry dialogue:
The line of dialogue belongs to the character; the verb is the writer sticking his nose in. But said is far less intrusive than grumbled, gasped, cautioned, lied.



4. Never use an adverb to modify the verb “said”:
… he admonished gravely. To use an adverb this way (or almost any way) is a mortal sin. The writer is now exposing himself in earnest, using a word that distracts and can interrupt the rhythm of the exchange.



5. Keep your exclamation points under control:
You are allowed no more than two or three per 100,000 words of prose.



6. Never use the words “suddenly” or “all hell broke loose”:
This rule doesn’t require an explanation. I have noticed that writers who use “suddenly” tend to exercise less control in the application of exclamation points.




7. Use regional dialect, patois, sparingly:
Once you start spelling words in dialogue phonetically and loading the page with apostrophes, you won’t be able to stop.



8. Avoid detailed descriptions of characters:
In Ernest Hemingway’s “Hills Like White Elephants” what do the “American and the girl with him” look like? “She had taken off her hat and put it on the table.” That’s the only reference to a physical description in the story, and yet we see the couple and know them by their tones of voice, with not one adverb in sight.



9. Don’t go into great detail describing places and things:
You don’t want descriptions that bring the action, the flow of the story, to a standstill.



10. Try to leave out the part that readers tend to skip.
My most important rule is one that sums up the 10: If it sounds like writing, I rewrite it.

chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Apr, 2019 10:51 am
@farmerman,
Don't think this one has been mentioned....

"That's a great question (fill in name of person asking).

First off, hopefully the person interviewing you knows it's a good/great question, that's why it's being asked.

When said in every day conversation, 99% of the time it's annoying AF

It's an updated version of "Good Job Brittney!"
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Apr, 2019 02:26 pm
@chai2,
Usually, when people say something is a great question, it means they don't have an answer.
chai2
 
  1  
Reply Sat 13 Apr, 2019 02:48 pm
@roger,
“Good question” is something I hear at least once, usually multiple times a day on NPR.

I really wonder if the person it’s being said to ever thinks something to the effect “oh great. I asked a good question “

Even as a little kid I was quite the skeptic, and when grownups started in with the positive affirmations I felt like I was being played.

Oh sure, I liked, even loved at times being told I was doing a great job etc. but only when I knew I was really having to work for it.

Telling me how “good” something I did/was doing only meant something when I was at the top of my game. I’m still like that today.

I do like hearing and saying “good point” from/to someone, as it’s well, one point.
0 Replies
 
Sturgis
 
  1  
Reply Mon 22 Apr, 2019 07:12 pm
If I hear or read bespoke one more time I'll either scream, puke or maybe both! Seems to be all over the danged place lately. Every book, every fifth of sixth news item and in television shows as well, often not even used correctly!
0 Replies
 
 

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