Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Thu 18 Apr, 2013 10:12 pm
@IRFRANK,
Technology is more likely to be our savior than our demise.

One could quite reasonably argue that nuclear weapons have prevented large scale wars for decades now. Without them it's difficult to imagine that the the US and USSR would not have eventually squared off.

It's not the technology we need to worry about it's the character of the people who wield it. Responsible adults don't allow children and the mentally incompetent to play with chainsaws, and responsible nations should not allow countries like Iran to have nuclear weapons. (Unfortunately they missed the chance to act responsibly with North Korea, and I fully expect that they will do the same when it comes to Iran).



JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 19 Apr, 2013 11:52 am
@Finn dAbuzz,
Quote:
and responsible nations should not allow countries like Iran to have nuclear weapons. (Unfortunately they missed the chance to act responsibly with North Korea, and I fully expect that they will do the same when it comes to Iran).


You've got your head so far up your ass, Finn. Responsible nations don't illegally invade other nations. That's what your US and its poodle the UK did in Iran - overthrew a democratically elected government and installed their own brutal dictator just so they could steal Iran wealth.

Responsible nations don't use nuclear weapons as the US did twice in one of the worst war crimes that the world has ever seen. And the US seriously consider their use in Korea too. Responsible nations don't continually slaughter innocents just to steal the very bread from their poor's tables.

You are as slimeball of gigantic proportions, a megalomaniacal liar and just a downright amoral individual. Have I missed any of your better qualities?
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Apr, 2013 06:12 am
The latest developments, from the BBC website.

Quote:
A US citizen will be tried soon on charges including attempting to overthrow North Korea's government, the North's official news agency says.

KCNA says that Pae Jun-Ho has admitted the charges, without specifying when the verdict will be handed down.

Pae Jun-Ho, who is known in the US as Kenneth Bae, was held last year after entering North Korea as a tourist.

His case comes at a time of high tension between Pyongyang and Washington.

This follows North Korea's third nuclear test in February.

"The preliminary inquiry into crimes committed by American citizen Pae Jun-Ho closed," the KCNA said in a report on Saturday.

"In the process of investigation he admitted that he committed crimes aimed to topple the DPRK (Democratic People's Republic of Korea) with hostility toward it.

"His crimes were proved by evidence," the report added. "He will soon be taken to the Supreme Court of the DPRK to face judgement."

It is not clear what sort of sanction Mr Pae, 44, might face, although North Korea's criminal code provides for life imprisonment or the death penalty for similar offences.

North Korea has arrested several US citizens in recent years, including journalists and Christians accused of proselytism. They have been released after intervention by senior American public figures.

Mr Pae, believed to be a tour operator of Korean descent, is the sixth American detained in North Korea since 2009.

Former Presidents Bill Clinton and Jimmy Carter as well as former UN Ambassador Bill Richardson have all been involved in mediation efforts to gain the release of previous American detainees.

In one of the most high-profile cases, Mr Clinton negotiated the release in 2009 of two US journalists, Laura Ling and Euna Lee, who had been found guilty of entering North Korea illegally.

"For North Korea, Bae is a bargaining chip in dealing with the US," Koh Yu-hwan, a professor of North Korean Studies at Dongguk University in Seoul told Associated Press news agency.

"The North will use him in a way that helps bring the US to talks when the mood slowly turns toward dialogue,'' he said.

The last South Korean workers will leave the joint industrial zone on Monday
Mr Pae was reportedly arrested in November after arriving in Rason - a special economic zone in the north-east of the country near the Russian border.

Washington has so far not publicly commented on the latest development.

The US and North Korea do not have diplomatic relations. The Swedish embassy in Pyongyang represents the US.

In a further sign of the continuing tension on the Korean peninsula, South Korea has begun withdrawing its remaining workers from the Kaesong joint industrial zone in North Korea.

The complex, once considered a symbol of reconciliation, lies just north of the military demarcation line dividing the two Koreas.

South Korean officials said 126 people had left, with the final 48 expected home by Monday.

North Korea has already withdrawn its 53,000 workers and blocked access to the zone in response to joint South Korean and US military exercises.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-22320287
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Apr, 2013 11:58 am
@izzythepush,
We can expect a statement from President Obama shortly:

The prosecution and sentencing of Kenneth Bae is considered by this Administration as a red line overwhich the North Koreans may not step.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Apr, 2013 12:38 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
A red line that might require that we request a UN report.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Apr, 2013 12:39 pm
I believe NK will then get a stern talking to.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Apr, 2013 12:56 pm
@edgarblythe,
And a revised red line.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Apr, 2013 01:00 pm
@roger,
He might underscore the red line with PERMANENT marker, also.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Apr, 2013 01:06 pm
@edgarblythe,
We used to draw lines in the sand. They shifted with the wind, and were quite convenient from a diplomatic standpoint. Nobody knew what the heck they meant.
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Apr, 2013 01:18 pm
@roger,
That reminds of the "3-mile-zone-lines" on the water.

(We had to catch a "passenger" just outside the 3-mile-zone of the GDR shore. This poor chap seemed to be quite exhausted. But since I noticed the shifting line moving towards the shore, we got him still in international waters, and avoided the third world war. Or just getting sunk.)
0 Replies
 
izzythepush
 
  1  
Reply Sat 27 Apr, 2013 01:42 pm
@edgarblythe,
Short of military escalation, what more can he do? There's nothing else left to embargo.
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Apr, 2013 12:39 pm
@izzythepush,
Whether or not he can do something he won't, which is why we have to hope he will not address this issue with the declaration of a "red line."

" Walk softly and carry a big stick" is excellent presidential policy. If a president refuses to carry the big stick though, it is all the more imperative that he walk very softly.

edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Apr, 2013 01:18 pm
Obama, Clinton and the two Bushes all had the same policy re N Korea, basically. Obama and Clinton get singled out of the four by some, due to partisan bias. Because nobody wants a new Korean War.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Apr, 2013 01:37 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Gee, you sure don't like it when others try to interfere in US kangaroo court proceedings.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Apr, 2013 01:47 pm
@roger,
You only want a UN report for those highly highly infrequent times when the world agrees with the US.

The rest of the time you're more than content to commit war crimes and terrorist acts to get your way. That's just how it is for the planet's worst rogue nation.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Apr, 2013 01:55 pm
@roger,
Quote:
We used to draw lines in the sand.


And then when poor Koreans fleeing from US carpet bombers/napalming war criminals crossed those imaginary lines, they were gunned down by US troops.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Apr, 2013 01:58 pm
@izzythepush,
Quote:
There's nothing else left to embargo.


They can remind them that their [US & UK] embargo was able to slaughter half a million Iraqi children. Oops, I forgot, ... North Korea doesn't care about their children, but the US and UK do care so deeply about all the children of the world.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 28 Apr, 2013 02:08 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Quote:
" Walk softly and carry a big stick" is excellent presidential policy.


It's a lie, a huge monstrous lie.

The US has NEVER "walked softly". It's only waved its big stick, callously slaughtering millions just to steal their wealth. And all under the grand pretense that it was a white knight coming to save the oppressed.

Yes, Izzy, "slaughtered". There's no need to create euphemisms to describe what the US and the UK are doing.
0 Replies
 
HesDeltanCaptain
 
  1  
Reply Mon 17 Aug, 2015 11:33 am
@IRFRANK,
DPRK is corrupt but not crazy. Pakistan is corrupt AND crazy and much more worrisome.
0 Replies
 
 

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