IRFRANK
 
Reply Wed 10 Apr, 2013 12:27 pm
What's the predictions? Will N. Korea launch a missile our way and what will we do about it ?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 13 • Views: 4,258 • Replies: 38
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Ice Demon
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Apr, 2013 12:40 pm
@IRFRANK,
Interception followed with a fist barrage if they have the gall to tempt our temps into zappin. In the end there will just last a fraction of the gasps from the irrational presence of the static evapin action of the western might.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Wed 10 Apr, 2013 01:09 pm
@IRFRANK,
I highly doubt it, but they could wreak some more local havoc, which could in turn demolish their population in reaction, a population which I manage to not quite blame for all this stuff.

Would like to hear what FBM thinks on all this, if he wants to say.
izzythepush
 
  0  
Reply Thu 11 Apr, 2013 04:58 am
@IRFRANK,
North Korea wants to make sure nobody tries regime change, most of the bluster is to make Kim Jong Un appear decisive.

Although it's quite clear he does what his generals tell him to do.

They won't fire any missiles, apart from tests, because that would make regime change more likely. They're already very isolated.

Quote:
"There is no disagreement with the United States over North Korea," Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov said at a meeting with US Secretary of State John Kerry in London on Wednesday.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-22103753
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Thu 11 Apr, 2013 08:40 am
@IRFRANK,
If North Korea does anything, I think they'll fire a missile which will crash into the ocean. They will claim it was a warning shot which scared their enemies away, and everyone else will claim it was a test launch which crashed into the ocean. Then all the volatile rhetoric will whimper away for another year, when it will start all over again as soon as "Entertainment News" needs to boost viewers again.
engineer
 
  2  
Reply Thu 11 Apr, 2013 08:57 am
@IRFRANK,
I think they will likely test fire a missile a short distance. They will not try a true test of a long range missile because those have generally been duds in the past. What they may do it shoot down a passenger jet, attack an isolated South Korean destroyer or smaller naval unit or detain South Koreans working in the north.
0 Replies
 
IRFRANK
 
  2  
Reply Thu 11 Apr, 2013 12:28 pm
All these comments seem quite plausible to me. Doubtful NK will do anything that justifies a response. They must realize what that might cause. I agree this is all intended to bolster Un's perceived strength. Seems very childish to me, but he is a child.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Apr, 2013 10:32 pm
@IRFRANK,
The question is why would North Korea launch a missile at the US, Frank.

Quote:
The Latest Threats to Life As We Know It
by William Blum
April 11, 2013

Last month numerous foreign-policy commentators marked the tenth anniversary of the fateful American bombing and invasion of Iraq. Those who condemned the appalling devastation of the Iraqi people and their society emphasized that it had all been a terrible mistake, since Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein didn’t actually possess weapons of mass destruction (WMD). This is the same argument we’ve heard repeatedly during the past ten years from most opponents of the war.

But of the many lies – explicit or implicit – surrounding the war in Iraq, the biggest one of all is that if, in fact, Saddam Hussein had had those WMD the invasion would have been justified; that in such case Iraq would indeed have been a threat to the United States or to Israel or to some other country equally decent, innocent and holy. However, I must ask as I’ve asked before: What possible reason would Saddam Hussein have had for attacking the United States or Israel other than an irresistible desire for mass national suicide? He had no reason, no more than the Iranians do today. No more than the Soviets had during the decades of the Cold War. No more than North Korea has ever had since the United States bombed them in the early 1950s. Yet last month the new Defense Secretary, Chuck Hagel, announced that he would strengthen United States defenses against a possible attack by [supposedly] nuclear-equipped North Korea, positioning 14 additional missile interceptors in Alaska and California at an estimated cost of $1 billion. So much for the newest Great White Hope. Does it ever matter who the individuals are who are occupying the highest offices of the US foreign-policy establishment? Or their gender or their color?

“Oh,” many people argued, “Saddam Hussein was so crazy who knew what he might do?” But when it became obvious in late 2002 that the US was intent upon invading Iraq, Saddam opened up the country to the UN weapons inspectors much more than ever before, offering virtually full cooperation. This was not the behavior of a crazy person; this was the behavior of a survivalist. He didn’t even use any WMD when he was invaded by the United States in 1991 (“the first Gulf War”), when he certainly had such weapons. Moreover, the country’s vice president, Tariq Aziz, went on major American television news programs to assure the American people and the world that Iraq no longer had any chemical, biological or nuclear weapons; and we now know that Iraq had put out peace feelers in early 2003 hoping to prevent the war. The Iraqi leaders were not crazy at all. Unless one believes that to oppose US foreign policy you have to be crazy. Or suicidal.

It can as well be argued that American leaders were crazy to carry out the Iraqi invasion in the face of tens of millions of people at home and around the world protesting against it, pleading with the Bush gang not to unleash the horrors. (How many demonstrations were there in support of the invasion?)

In any event, the United States did not invade Iraq because of any threat of an attack using WMD. Washington leaders did not themselves believe that Iraq possessed such weapons of any significant quantity or potency. Amongst the sizable evidence supporting this claim we have the fact that they would not have exposed hundreds of thousands of soldiers on the ground.

Nor can it be argued that mere possession of such weapons – or the belief of same – was reason enough to take action, for then the United States would have to invade Russia, France, Israel, et al.

I have written much of the above in previous editions of this report, going back to 2003. But I’m afraid that I and other commentators will have to be repeating these observations for years to come. Myths that reinforce official government propaganda die hard. The mainstream media act like they don’t see through them, while national security officials thrive on them to give themselves a mission, to enhance their budgets, and further their personal advancement. The Washington Post recently reported: “A year into his tenure, the country’s young leader, Kim Jong Un, has proved even more bellicose than his father, North Korea’s longtime ruler, disappointing U.S. officials who had hoped for a fresh start with the regime.”[1]

Yeah, right, can’t you just see those American officials shaking their heads and exclaiming: “Damn, what do we have to do to get those North Korean fellows to trust us?” Well, they could start by ending the many international sanctions they impose on North Korea. They could discontinue arming and training South Korean military forces. And they could stop engaging in provocative fly-overs, ships cruising the waters, and military exercises along with South Korea, Australia, and other countries dangerously close to the North. The Wall Street Journal reported:

The first show of force came on March 8, during the U.S.-South Korean exercise, known as Foal Eagle, when long-range B-52 bombers conducted low-altitude maneuvers. A few weeks later, in broad daylight, two B-2 bombers sent from a Missouri air base dropped dummy payloads on a South Korean missile range.

U.S. intelligence agencies, as had been planned, reviewed the North’s responses. After those flights, the North responded as the Pentagon and intelligence agencies had expected, with angry rhetoric, threatening to attack the South and the U.S.

On Sunday, the U.S. flew a pair of advanced F-22s to South Korea, which prompted another angry response from the North.[2]

And the United States could stop having wet dreams about North Korea collapsing, enabling the US to establish an American military base right at the Chinese border.

As to North Korea’s frequent threats … yes, they actually outdo the United States in bellicosity, lies, and stupidity. But their threats are not to be taken any more seriously than Washington’s oft expressed devotion to democracy and freedom. When it comes to doing actual harm to other peoples, the North Koreans are not in the same league as the empire.

“Everyone is concerned about miscalculation and the outbreak of war. But the sense across the U.S. government is that the North Koreans are not going to wage all-out war,” a senior Obama administration official said. “They are interested first and foremost in regime survival.”[3]

American sovereignty hasn’t faced a legitimate foreign threat to its existence since the British in 1812.

Notes

[1] Washington Post, March 16, 2013

[2] Wall Street Journal, April 3, 2013

[3] Ibid.


http://www.foreignpolicyjournal.com/2013/04/11/the-latest-threats-to-life-as-we-know-it/
0 Replies
 
hawkeye10
 
  1  
Reply Fri 12 Apr, 2013 11:32 pm
@rosborne979,
rosborne979 wrote:

If North Korea does anything, I think they'll fire a missile which will crash into the ocean. They will claim it was a warning shot which scared their enemies away, and everyone else will claim it was a test launch which crashed into the ocean. Then all the volatile rhetoric will whimper away for another year, when it will start all over again as soon as "Entertainment News" needs to boost viewers again.

if by "crash" you mean they will fire a missile into the ocean then you are giving the consensus opinion. I am expecting a launch to a deserted japanese island along with another nuke test. then they will "honor" chinese requests for talks.
izzythepush
 
  -1  
Reply Sun 14 Apr, 2013 01:55 am
Now there's a row between the BBC and the LSE about using undercover reporters.

Quote:
The London School of Economics has demanded the BBC withdraw Monday's Panorama programme about North Korea.

It said Panorama reporter John Sweeney posed as one of its PhD students on a university society trip in order to film undercover in the country.

The BBC said the students were told a journalist was among the group and warned of the risks.

But LSE said students were "not given enough information to enable informed consent" and were "endangered".

On its website, Panorama said Sweeney spent eight days undercover inside North Korea for the programme.

"Travelling from the capital Pyongyang to the countryside beyond and to the de-militarised zone on the border with South Korea, Sweeney witnesses a landscape bleak beyond words, a people brainwashed for three generations and a regime happy to give the impression of marching towards Armageddon," it said.


http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-22140716
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Sun 14 Apr, 2013 12:19 pm
@hawkeye10,
As it is in all situations like this around the globe, it is the US and sometimes its poodles that causes most of the trouble. The US provokes, illegally and, as always, immorally but those provocations are hidden. When anybody responds to the US provocations, the US propaganda mills go into full force and it's played up to the hilt.

There's really not a whole lot of difference between US propaganda and the propaganda that comes from anywhere. As the Soviet reporter said, the only difference is that you idiots believe the US propaganda.

Quote:
Fidel Castro warned Hugo Chavez early in his career to be careful, that the United States would use democracy to bring him down. If you stop reading there, the message will be lost. Castro was not saying that our shadow leadership lurking behind our symbols of democracy actually believes in any of that stuff. Get real. He was saying that Chavez would have to play by the rules, while the US would not. He would have to fight fire with fire, and in so doing would be at a disadvantage. His every move would be publicized while those of the US would be kept secret.

http://pieceofmind.wordpress.com/2013/03/06/hugo-chavez-a-job-well-done-rest-in-peace/
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Apr, 2013 10:37 pm
@IRFRANK,
I very much doubt it, but if anyone could be even relatively certain, this would not be an issue in the news and of discussion.

The posturing is Kim III's attempt to shore up his bonafides with the military and to postion NK into receiving new incentives to back down.

Based on history, it will eventually work.

I'm more worried about their inability to control their nukes then their intent to use them. This is a nation that gets by on spit and duck tape.

North Korea is the single most obvious reason why we cannot allow Iran to develop nuclear weapons...but, we will.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Sun 14 Apr, 2013 11:03 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
As I mentioned, " As the Soviet reporter said, the only difference is that you idiots believe the US propaganda".
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  -1  
Reply Mon 15 Apr, 2013 03:29 am
@hawkeye10,
Quote:
I am expecting a launch to a deserted japanese island along with another nuke test


LOL somehow hitting a target as big as the average island seem unlikely.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Apr, 2013 04:09 am
@BillRM,
Islands are hard to sink, too. That was proven in the second world war.
0 Replies
 
IRFRANK
 
  2  
Reply Mon 15 Apr, 2013 06:05 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Time is showing that to be correct. How long can man keep these horrible weapons under control? In time our technology will be our demise. That's my opinion. We are so predisposed to treat each other badly and reach for violence.
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Apr, 2013 07:34 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:
Would like to hear what FBM thinks on all this, if he wants to say.


Why would you want to hear from a guy that has been steeped in, for his whole life, the same propaganda as you have, Osso. Of what possible use would it be to have that propaganda regurgitated?
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Apr, 2013 09:40 pm
@IRFRANK,
Quote:
What's the predictions? Will N. Korea launch a missile our way and what will we do about it ?


What would you do, what would you have done had you been under this kind of pressure for 60 years, Frank?


Quote:

The Korean War: The “Unknown War”. The Coverup of US War Crimes

By Sherwood Ross

...

Though the North Koreans had a reputation for viciousness, according to Cumings, U.S. soldiers actually engaged in more civilian massacres. This included dropping over half a million tons of bombs and thousands of tons of napalm, more than was loosed on the entire Pacific theater in World War II, almost indiscriminately. The review goes on to say, “Cumings deftly reveals how Korea was a clear precursor to Vietnam: a divided country, fighting a long anti-colonial war with a committed and underestimated enemy; enter the U.S., efforts go poorly, disillusionment spreads among soldiers, and lies are told at top levels in an attempt to ignore or obfuscate a relentless stream of bad news. For those who like their truth unvarnished, Cumings’s history will be a fresh, welcome take on events that seemed to have long been settled.”

Interviewed in two one-hour installments by Lawrence Velvel, Dean of the Massachusetts School of Law at Andover, producers of Comcast’s “Books of Our Time” with the first installment being shown on Sunday, March 20th, Cumings said U.S. coverage of the war was badly slanted. Hanson Baldwin, the military correspondent for The New York Times, described “North Koreans as locusts, like Nazis, like vermin, who come shrieking on. I mean, this is really hard stuff to read in an era when you don’t get away with that kind of thinking anymore.” Cumings adds, “Rapes were extremely common. Koreans in the South will still say that that was one of the worst things of the war (was how)many American soldiers were raping Korean women.”

...

http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-korean-war-the-unknown-war-the-coverup-of-us-war-crimes/23742
0 Replies
 
BillRM
 
  -1  
Reply Tue 16 Apr, 2013 03:44 am
@IRFRANK,
Quote:
That's my opinion. We are so predisposed to treat each other badly and reach for violence.


Let see two atoms bombs used in 1945 and it now 2013 with no other nuclear weapons being employed in warfare.
JTT
 
  0  
Reply Tue 16 Apr, 2013 10:43 am
@BillRM,
The US seriously considered using them in their illegal invasion of Korea.
0 Replies
 
 

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