20
   

Does the UNIVERSE have a boundary or OUTER LIMIT?

 
 
Jpsy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 23 Nov, 2013 08:14 pm
@Bibliophile the BibleGuru,
I guess I will reply to this, although it will probably not be read since it is on the 13th page. I am reading a lot of misconceptions about the big bang and our universe. Someone stated the boundary is where light from the initial big bang is infrared. That infrared light is everywhere in our universe not just on this "edge" or boundary. The big bang was the expansion of all space and time, there is no center or edge. We are just as much in the center as any other galaxy. We with our limited mind cannot picture a 4 dimensional Universe. The only way can visualize is with the 2 dimensional analogy of the surface of a balloon (not the entire 3 dimensional balloon. The expansion of our universe is like drawing all of the galaxies on the surface of the balloon. As the balloon expands the universe gets larger, the distances between the galaxies get larger, but there is no center on the surface of the balloon. There is no outer edge. If you travel on the surface of the balloon you can go around and around for infinity but never reach a boundary.
Jpsy
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Nov, 2013 03:25 am
@hitchhiker,
Quote:
Problem is we keep thinking in terms of space and time as seperate enties but they are connected somehow. According to special relativity given two events seperated by a distance d and a time t there is an interval that seperates them. This interival is given by square root ( d*d - t*t ). The wird thing is that this interval is the same regardless of who looks at the events and how fast they are traveling.


can you explain this a little better please. I'm not following it.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Nov, 2013 05:34 am
Hitchhiker has not posted in these fora in more than nine years. I suspect you won't be getting an answer.
0 Replies
 
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Nov, 2013 05:58 am
@Jpsy,
Quote:
If you travel on the surface of the balloon you can go around and around for infinity but never reach a boundary.


In what medium does the balloon float?
Jpsy
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Nov, 2013 03:40 am
@spendius,
That's a good question? If our universe is finite, like the balloon analogy suggests, what is outside our universe? I'd love to hear some physicists ideas on that. Does anyone have Stephen Hawking's email address?

I Googled "what's outside the universe" & read some interesting articles on geek.com and askamathematician.com

Some of the answers were:
1. nothing, our universe is all that there is (even though its finite)
2. Our universe is infinite (in which case there are major flaws with the balloon analogy)
Interesting quote: "If the universe is infinite, it would also contain an infinite amount of matter. In this case, literally every possible arrangement of matter is present an infinite number of times. There are an infinite number of Earths out there, if we look far enough afield, some drastically different from ours, some virtually identical, some literally identical. Actually, there would be an infinite number of every one of the infinite possible Earths. As to what’s outside this universe, well, there’s obviously nothing beyond an infinite border." Mind boggling.
3."then there are the multiverse explanations. These postulate that the universe split off after the Big Bang into everything from bubbles to sheets. Our universe is just one of many, possibly a finite number or possibly infinite. In this conception, what’s “outside” our universe is simply another universe. It could have identical physical laws to our own home, or have completely different ones. Everything from gravity to the strong nuclear force could be different, leading to a reality that could behave differently in fundamental ways"

-But then your question still has relevance; what medium fills the space between these universes?

Cosmologists have the best jobs. They get paid to sit around and think about this crazy stuff. It makes me realize how much my job sucks. Sorry for the long reply.
spendius
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Nov, 2013 04:31 am
@Jpsy,
That's okay Jpsy. It was a good one.

What about an infinite number of Jpsys providing that exact reply to an infinite number of spendiuses who have just had porridge and a banana for breakfast at an infinite number of siderial times.

Perhaps cosmologists ought to apologise for stealing candy off taxpayers.
0 Replies
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Nov, 2013 06:37 am
Quote:
Equus said: If infinite stars existed outward in time and space to infinity, we would be able to see their light, even as the tiniest of pinpricks in the night sky. The night should be a solid mass of light from an infinite number of stars and galaxies shining light toward us from infinite time. The night is NOT a solid mass of light. Therefore, the cosmos is finite.

But what if the furthest stars are travelling away from us so fast in the expanding universe that their light is red-shifted into the invisible spectrum and we can't therefore see them?
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Nov, 2013 06:54 am
Equus has not posted in years and years. I suspect you won't be getting an answer to your silly question.
0 Replies
 
Romeo Fabulini
 
  1  
Reply Sat 30 Nov, 2013 10:30 am
Now I come to think of it, I read a short article by Isaac Asimov or Arthur C. Clarke some years ago in which he said something like- "If the universe wasn't expanding, the night sky would be a dazzling white sheet composed of stars with no black spaces between them and we'd all be dead with the heat given off by all those countless stars."
0 Replies
 
sobu m varkey
 
  1  
Reply Sat 3 Oct, 2015 02:12 pm
@Bibliophile the BibleGuru,
i think our technological programs should concentrate on traveling space in the speed of light years. may be this will works with black holes.
0 Replies
 
Usman ahmad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 22 Oct, 2015 01:29 am
@marcuslangford,
it is theorized that there is edge of universe and that edge is "no space and time". But just imagin that What is "no time and space zone"? Its the most simple answer of most complicated question, does the universe has some boundry?
0 Replies
 
 

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