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Does "related of" mean "associated with"?

 
 
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 01:57 am

Context:
"The Christian myths were first related of Horus or Osiris, who was the embodiment of divine goodness, wisdom, truth and purity...This was the greatest hero that ever lived in the mind of man -- not in the flesh -- the only hero to whom the miracles were natural because he was not human. "
 
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nothingtodo
 
  -1  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 02:07 am
@oristarA,
No, direct decedent of, knowledge wise.
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 04:55 am
@nothingtodo,
nothingtodo wrote:

No, direct decedent of, knowledge wise.


Sorry failed to understand you.
nothingtodo
 
  0  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 06:14 am
@oristarA,
Descendant
The spell checker I used has been tampered with or it has been edited since.

'Associated with' would imply that it had been associated and not directly linked properly.

Very perspective based, given peoples beliefs about it and that very idea...
Very worried about given the weight applied to what happened so long ago, mind you.
0 Replies
 
Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 07:12 am
@oristarA,

it should be "related to"... although "attributed to" would make more sense in this context.
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contrex
  Selected Answer
 
  3  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 10:14 am
Nobody so far has answered this question properly. One of the meanings of 'related' is the past participle of the verb to relate - to tell or recount (a story or account). The writer of the quoted text is saying that The Christian myths stories) were first related of (told of or told about) Horus.



ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 10:48 am
@contrex,
Contrex has it right.
0 Replies
 
JTT
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 12:14 pm
@contrex,
SELECTED ANSWER!
0 Replies
 
nothingtodo
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 02:12 pm
@contrex,
bravadyo
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Fri 28 Dec, 2012 10:45 pm
@contrex,
contrex wrote:

Nobody so far has answered this question properly. One of the meanings of 'related' is the past participle of the verb to relate - to tell or recount (a story or account). The writer of the quoted text is saying that The Christian myths stories) were first related of (told of or told about) Horus.


In Christian myths, Horus was the first that was told?
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Dec, 2012 03:24 am
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:
In Christian myths, Horus was the first that was told?


The writer is alleging that the same stories related (told) by the early Christians about Jesus, were previously told, centuries before the pre-Christian era, by the ancient Egyptians, about their deity Horus. (This allegation is vigorously disputed by many Biblical scholars).

McTag
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Dec, 2012 05:46 am
@contrex,

Contrex is right again, by golly.
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Dec, 2012 06:14 am
@McTag,
McTag wrote:
Contrex is right again, by golly.


Except I had hastily edited my post and left "centuries before the pre-Christian era", which is nonsense, it should be "centuries before the Christian era".
0 Replies
 
nothingtodo
 
  1  
Reply Sat 29 Dec, 2012 10:56 pm
@oristarA,
A similar sentence or rather statement .. Pertaining to the phrase, might be..

"Two Gods argued the fate of an army, the people below erratically celebrated in all the usual ways, of diverse mischief and worry, the days information they had received, was not related of the battle raging above, or its intensity"..

A further assertion one can make after that statement, is that, had they known .. All aspects, perhaps usual language and civility would be replaced with singular clarity.. Leaving them ignoring the ale, perhaps even to the point it was logical to assert its incorrectness, as noted, to be importantly denounced with that incorrectness. Which may arrive, "It is indeed correct.. yet again we see we are wrong otherwise".

A majority or minority of the army might also be forced by such a situation to be stating "Ahh, yes .. Of course" repetitively... Verbally or otherwise depending on the situation. As is every day for some of us.
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