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Does "broken up about" mean "cut off the relationship with"?

 
 
Reply Wed 12 Dec, 2012 07:25 am

Context:

Phil's all broken up about his dead hookers
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Type: Question • Score: 3 • Views: 1,756 • Replies: 5
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tsarstepan
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Reply Wed 12 Dec, 2012 07:43 am
@oristarA,
No. It doesn't mean that. In theory, it means he's emotionally devastated. With the use of the term 'dead hookers', I suspect it could be a sarcastic remark claiming that Phil is emotionally devastated about the deaths of the prostitutes he either uses regularly or under his hire (as in he is or was a pimp).

Either way, "broken up about" is an idiom about being emotionally wrecked about some personal event.
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ehBeth
 
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Reply Wed 12 Dec, 2012 07:44 am
@oristarA,
No.

Idioms again.

http://www.english-slang.com/eng/american/i_b/848-break-up

(category - American idioms)

Quote:
To lose or destroy spirit or self-control. — Usually used in the passive.

Mrs. Lawrence was all broken up after her daughter's death, and did not go out of the house for two months.

oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Dec, 2012 08:05 am
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

No.

Idioms again.

http://www.english-slang.com/eng/american/i_b/848-break-up

(category - American idioms)

Quote:
To lose or destroy spirit or self-control. — Usually used in the passive.

Mrs. Lawrence was all broken up after her daughter's death, and did not go out of the house for two months.




I cannot open it.
It seems our insane government has blocked the site.
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Wed 12 Dec, 2012 08:20 am
@oristarA,
Do any of the sites that cover idioms work for you?

It is helpful for us to know if you can't access the sites that review/discuss English-language idioms as it explains, in part, why you're having such difficulty with them.

I'm not sure how you're supposed to do your work if you're not allowed to access resources that would increase your ability to do that work effectively.

There are many jokes in North America about the odd descriptions of things coming from your country. I'm surprised the government doesn't put more effort into letting people learn English as it is actually used.
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McTag
 
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Reply Wed 12 Dec, 2012 04:29 pm
@oristarA,

Quote:
Does "broken up about" mean "cut off the relationship with"?


What a minefield you have to deal with, with idioms I mean. And American idioms are often different from UK ones.

"broken up with" means separated from.
"broken up about" means upset about

The first of these is common in the UK, the second is almost exclusively American.
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