15
   

Ok smarty-Pantses......how do snails know the difference between watering and rain?

 
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Nov, 2012 07:21 am
@farmerman,
Interesting.

I don't think they have access to the weather channel. I don't.
0 Replies
 
Joe Nation
 
  2  
Reply Mon 5 Nov, 2012 09:17 am
@dlowan,
Is there fluoride in the water you spray out of the hose?

Joe(even I can smell that)Nation

0 Replies
 
Roberta
 
  2  
Reply Mon 5 Nov, 2012 09:44 am
You got snails? Wow.

I suspect it's some kind of atmospheric thing. Animals have all kinds of senses we don't have.

Snails. Wow again.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Mon 5 Nov, 2012 01:36 pm
From Snail World-dot-com.

Quote:
Other types of land snails though live underground so you will only see them out there when it is raining and they have to come to the surface so that they don’t drown. They only live less than one inch below the surface though so it is easy enough for them to come out when the rain starts. They are able to easily move as they need to though to get through the changing weather conditions. Even though they are very slow animals by nature, they are very instinctive when it comes to their habitat and survival skills.


So i suspect that the snails don't react to you watering your plants because there is not enough water to threaten them with drowning.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Nov, 2012 01:55 pm
@Setanta,
But they don't live underground...they live deep in the plants......under leaves and such. They seal themselves off with dried slime, I suppose it is, so they don't dehydrate.

May well be the fluoride and the humidity.

They get more water when I water them than they do from rain.

But last night they were FRISKY! Prancing they were. hot to trot. Seemed to find the storm exciting. They weren't feeding...they were gathering at the tops of plants looking frenzied. I was surprised fights weren't breaking out.

Boida...why are you surprised I have snail? Did you want a few million as pets?
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Mon 5 Nov, 2012 01:59 pm
@Ragman,
Ragman wrote:
Thirdly, the mineral or hardness vs softeness is different. Rainwater might have more calcium and trace minerals than tap water.

I would think rain water would be basically pure (basically distilled) H2O with no minerals at all, except maybe some contaminants picked up from the atmosphere.
Rockhead
 
  1  
Reply Mon 5 Nov, 2012 02:01 pm
@DrewDad,
our tap water is so heavy and full of minerals that we don't drink it. even the cats won't touch it...

rainwater is very soft.
0 Replies
 
IRFRANK
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2012 11:40 am
There is obviously something the snails are considering that you aren't.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2012 01:51 pm
@IRFRANK,
Exactly. So, what is it?
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2012 01:54 pm
@dlowan,
I figured it was the difference between soft and hard water, as we discussed above....
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2012 01:55 pm
@DrewDad,
Sorry for the confusion. I wrote he opposite of what I meant to put there. Rainwater is soft in most places ...whereas tap water is often quite hard (minerals like calcium and trace metals).
roger
 
  4  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2012 01:56 pm
@Ragman,
What this site needs is a good water treatment specialist.
Roberta
 
  3  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2012 01:58 pm
@dlowan,
dlowan wrote:

Boida...why are you surprised I have snail? Did you want a few million as pets?


Why am I not surprised you have snails. When it rains here in the city, all I see is puddles.

If you wanna send me a snail pet, make sure it's one of the frisky ones. Can't imagine what a frisky snail is like.
IRFRANK
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2012 08:27 pm
@dlowan,
I wouldn't know. Ask a snail. Or someone who tests such things
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2012 10:12 pm
@dlowan,
dlowan wrote:

Exactly. So, what is it?
Humidity in the atmosphere.
Ragman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2012 10:15 pm
@roger,
ahahah. that was choice.
0 Replies
 
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2012 11:16 pm
Atmospheric pressure?
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2012 11:31 pm
@DrewDad,
DrewDad wrote:

I figured it was the difference between soft and hard water, as we discussed above....


But Irfrank sounded as though he KNEW. He sounded smug.
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2012 11:32 pm
@IRFRANK,
IRFRANK wrote:

I wouldn't know. Ask a snail. Or someone who tests such things



This is a question and answer site. I'm asking.

0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Nov, 2012 11:33 pm
@rosborne979,
rosborne979 wrote:

dlowan wrote:

Exactly. So, what is it?
Humidity in the atmosphere.


But when I water them their atmosphere becomes very humid...wet, in fact.
 

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