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Orionid meteor shower: This Saturday, 20 October

 
 
Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 06:24 pm
Orionid meteor shower: Watch for fireballs during weekend peak
One of the more spectacular meteor showers of the year peaks overnight Saturday, with perhaps 60 visible meteors an hour. Fireballs – any meteor brighter than Venus – are likely as Orionids plunge into the atmosphere at 148,000 miles per hour.
http://www.csmonitor.com/Science/2012/1019/Orionid-meteor-shower-Watch-for-fireballs-during-weekend-peak

With light pollution and partly cloudy weather for Saturday, I'm not sure that NYC is the ideal location for watching the meteor shower. Still anyone interested in planning to watch the event?
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Setanta
 
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Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 06:36 pm
Weather permitting, certainly.
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Ragman
 
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Reply Fri 19 Oct, 2012 07:46 pm
@tsarstepan,
"Tonight/early morning (west coast of FL) and tomorrow night/early morning I'm going to watch the peak of the Orionid meteor showers after midnight. This will be a very visible and a particularly active event forecasted to be about 60 meteors per hour.

Clear sky tonight here and barely a waxing sliver of a crescent moon with no interference. Weather permitting in most of North America it’s supposed to be good viewing from 1:00 am ET to just before dawn.

If you're in south FL it is found in the northeastern sky (radiating north from constellation Orion, the Hunter), in the vicinity of the planet Jupiter. The brightest star in the sky, Sirius, is to the southwest of Orion in the dome of the sky. Before dawn it is found high in the east here. You don't have to know Orion to see the meteors. The meteors will appear in all parts of the sky. But if you trace the paths of the meteors backwards, you’ll note that they all seem to come from single point within Orion.

In the hours before dawn, the dazzling planet Venus comes into view in the eastern sky. How can you identify Jupiter and Venus? By their brightness! They are brighter than Sirius, the sky’s brightest star. Venus is brighter than Jupiter."
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