7
   

New Comet May Be Observers' Dream Come True

 
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Sun 30 Dec, 2012 07:30 am
@oralloy,
yeh we went though that introductory stuff about 2 months ago. My Questar catadioptric is good enough for me. Anything bigger and I can use my druthers to hang out at a local observatory
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Sun 30 Dec, 2012 08:44 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
My Questar catadioptric is good enough for me. Anything bigger and I can use my druthers to hang out at a local observatory


Actually, both the Questar and "anything bigger" will be the wrong thing to use for a comet.

The best thing to use for viewing a comet is a high quality pair of astronomical binoculars mounted on a parallelogram.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Sun 30 Dec, 2012 10:14 am
@oralloy,
not if you want to photograph it. My Questar, (AND all observatory scopes) have really tight clock drives to keep on station. Scoping with a good pair of light gathering binoks is a good way to have everyone in the family enjoy the comet )or the dark sky) but youll never get any decent photos
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Mon 31 Dec, 2012 07:22 pm
@farmerman,

I never think of amateur astronomy in terms of photos. In my opinion, there is no substitute for photons flowing directly from space into your eyes.

I know there are a lot of people out there who do take pictures though.
0 Replies
 
Zarathustra
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jan, 2013 05:15 pm
@oralloy,
Now he tells me!

Quote:
While a few looks through the 17.5 inch scope might be interesting, you'll probably get the best views of a comet from a high quality set of astronomical binoculars.


Thank you for the information and advice. It is just after 40+ years of observations, which include two or three dozen comets; it is too late to change. In my defense (specializing in globular clusters and anonymous galaxies) most of those comet observations were unplanned and, obviously, extremely undesired. Although that doesn’t make it any less embarrassing to learn that I have been doing it wrong all these years.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Jan, 2013 05:29 pm
@Zarathustra,
we have an irony button up on the right sideof your keeboard
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Wed 2 Jan, 2013 12:24 am
@Zarathustra,
Zarathustra wrote:
Now he tells me!

Quote:
While a few looks through the 17.5 inch scope might be interesting, you'll probably get the best views of a comet from a high quality set of astronomical binoculars.


Thank you for the information and advice. It is just after 40+ years of observations, which include two or three dozen comets; it is too late to change. In my defense (specializing in globular clusters and anonymous galaxies) most of those comet observations were unplanned and, obviously, extremely undesired. Although that doesn’t make it any less embarrassing to learn that I have been doing it wrong all these years.


I don't see why you should be embarrassed (or think you were doing anything wrong). It's just that if you want to enjoy the best views of this comet when it is at its most spectacular (presuming it will be as grand as hoped), your dob has way too narrow a field of view to encompass a significant portion of the comet in a single frame.

Why too late to change? If you don't want to buy a quality pair of astronomical binoculars, I'm sure there will be lots of outings where people gather to watch the comet. Find someone who has a set of Fujinon 16x70s on a parallelogram and have a look through them.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 20 Nov, 2013 07:07 am

PBS is has a show tonight about the approaching comet.

The show is called "Comet Encounter", and it should be on at 10:00 PM, after a double episode of Nova.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Thu 28 Nov, 2013 02:32 pm

Bad news. The comet has not appeared on the other side of the sun. Looks like it completely vaporized.

They're still watching for it, but not really a lot of hope at this point. Sad
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Thu 28 Nov, 2013 02:42 pm
@oralloy,
oralloy wrote:


Bad news. The comet has not appeared on the other side of the sun. Looks like it completely vaporized.

They're still watching for it, but not really a lot of hope at this point. Sad

This could be a great start to an epic science fiction novel. "Recent graduate Doctor Annie Powers investigates the mysterious disappearance of a highly anticipated comet. When she discovers the truth, she soon finds herself in a race to save the world from utter annihilation."
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Nov, 2013 04:36 pm
@oralloy,
I will pray for it.
0 Replies
 
rosborne979
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Nov, 2013 04:54 pm
@oralloy,
oralloy wrote:
Bad news. The comet has not appeared on the other side of the sun. Looks like it completely vaporized.

Bummer. So much for the comet of the century.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  0  
Reply Fri 29 Nov, 2013 02:09 am

New Reports Say Comet Not Dead!!!

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-25143861
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Fri 29 Nov, 2013 03:44 am
On the radio last night, a commentator (or should that be a comet-ator?) was saying that the study of an fragments which survive will actually more valuable as scientific data than if the snowball had survived.
0 Replies
 
 

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