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Pumpernickel - time for me to try making it, have you?

 
 
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 02:42 pm
I tend to follow conversations on Freshloaf.com - and will be looking at what this person posting on Freshloaf is saying:

http://www.samartha.net/SD/procedures/PPN01/index.html
"What is going on in this country (USA) in respect to the denomination of Pumpernickel bread makes me want to yell and scream!!!!

It can be understood when a home baker plays around and comes up with something s/he likes. But when so-called Master Chefs like Lauren Groveman on PBS video clips happily mix coffee, plums, wheat flour, yeast and some rye flour together, and calls this "making pumpernickel bread from scratch" with Julia Child just yelping about the great smell, or supermarkets having brown colored wonderbread mislabeled in a similar fashion, then is this a very good reason to scream FOUL and clarify the issue.

Pumpernickel bread is made from rye meal, salt, water and sourdough starter in a baking process which takes at least 16 hours!

The color and sweet -sour pungent taste and smell is produced by the special baking process where the the grain starches are changed by the Maillard Reaction (new window ) and give this bread its unique properties.

Other ingredients for coloring or sweetening like molasses, cacao, coffee, sugar, yeast, wheat flour, corn, etc. would violate the honest and pure pumpernickel spirit and make the product unsellable as Pumpernickel in other countries."

This will probably take me a while. I haven't even started starter.


mmmm, I see this is probably out of my league.

How about making rye bread at all?
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Type: Discussion • Score: 3 • Views: 2,934 • Replies: 18
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hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 06:06 pm
@ossobuco,
Half bookmark, half request. Good luck with your pumpernickel - let me know if you see a gluten free recipe!
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 06:31 pm
@ossobuco,
Quote:
mmmm, I see this is probably out of my league.

How about making rye bread at all?

Nah.
If anyone can make it at home, you can, osso. Smile

I love pumpernickel!
I wonder what a homemade version would taste like?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 07:26 pm
@hingehead,
I get gluten free -
I'm sure it's impossible re pumpernickel as such. (I think)
I don't know what Freshloaf.c0m has to say about gluten free, but check it out, many posters seem very engaged, and there may be a whole section on it.

Ok, ok, I'll look
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 07:31 pm
@ossobuco,
OK, here:

http://www.thefreshloaf.com/searchresults?cx=partner-pub-5060446827351852%3A9bvu1n-clx1&cof=FORID%3A9&ie=ISO-8859-1&cow=gluten+free&sa=Search
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 08:03 pm
@ossobuco,
Ooh I found one good one. I should have been a little more specific and said I don't want to use 'gluten free' flour that replicates what gluten does with xanthum gum and bunch of other yucky chemicals, I'm looking for recipes don't use wheat because it's not an ingredient. Does that make sense? The one I found uses quinoa and garbanzo flour - excellent!
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 08:13 pm
@hingehead,
I even finally found/bought garbanzo flour - to make socca. Haven't tried that yet but plan to. That wasn't re freshloaf but about an article a few years ago by Mark Bittman (may he rest in piece, I don't do the NYTimes now) about socca.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 08:15 pm
@hingehead,
Of course that makes sense.
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 08:19 pm
@ossobuco,
Hm, the German Pumpernickel bread has no , cocoa or coffee in there...

Ground wheat, ground rye, wheat flour, sunflower seeds, flax seed, sugar beet syrup (unsulfured molasses) , buttermilk, yeast and salt is used to make Pumpernickel.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 08:22 pm
@hingehead,
Chase buckwheat, which is not actually a wheat. I forget what I remember about it, but promising.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 08:27 pm
@CalamityJane,
That reference I had at the start of this thread was much more strict than you are. No way I could replicate his take.

You're looking at me with some stone ground rye.
CalamityJane
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 08:53 pm
@ossobuco,
I wouldn't attempt to make Pumpernickel, but I am lucky as I can buy it
at our local supermarket - all natural (even kosher)...and imported from Germany.

http://parthenonfoods.com/images/MestemacherPumpernickel500g.jpg
hingehead
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 08:55 pm
@CalamityJane,
It's easily found in our supermarkets too. Keeps for ages and is low GI.
0 Replies
 
thack45
 
  2  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 09:17 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:

I forget what I remember about it

I don't think anyone has ever so concisely described half of my brain than you just did. To the sig line thread it goes...

and I loves me some pumpernickle. Looking forward to the results.
thack45
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 09:25 pm
@CalamityJane,
your bread is out of date Wink
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 09:31 pm
@thack45,
Right. I'll play with what I have (what is this on my counter?). Some bread stuff that I post takes me a while.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Jul, 2012 10:02 pm
@ossobuco,
meantime, I'm working on crackers.
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Jul, 2012 01:13 am
@ossobuco,
When I was young - lets's say about 50 years ago - you only could get few different breads in bakery:
- "Paderborner", the 'normal' everyday bread (with about 79% rye flour in it)
http://i49.tinypic.com/8x8qcj.jpg
- "Kasseler", which has less rye
http://i45.tinypic.com/20gcy8l.jpg
- "white bread" (wheat)
- "raisin bread" (a sweet white bread with only little rye flour in it)
- and a baguette-like bread.

Only very few bakeries made Pumpernickel, because the oven had to be used all day for just one kind of bread. (So you got it in others packed from those bakeries.)

Until today, just three larger bakeries are left, who produce Pumpernickel in the original, traditional way: one in the town where I live (I don't eat their Pumpernickel because we got it [tinned] in the navy), then the one CJ showed (it was nearly unknown until about 25 years outside the production place) and then the one where it's produced since 1570 (that's the one, you still get in local bakeries - the business is in same family since it's beginnigs)

Their Pumpernickel is only made from rye, water and a little bit of salt
http://i46.tinypic.com/t54q2q.jpg
"Backed for 24 hours at 100°C in water vapour. The bread sold locally, is just wrapped in 'silver paper', you can store it some months.
When pasteurised, like this package ...
http://i47.tinypic.com/246w0p2.jpg
... it's fresh for one year and more.
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sun 5 Aug, 2012 12:39 pm
@Walter Hinteler,
Thanks, interesting!
0 Replies
 
 

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