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How many Germans live in Chile and Argentina? How many Welsh?

 
 
Mr Bandiera
 
  1  
Reply Sat 5 Jun, 2004 09:12 am
Here in Brazil we use the word ''Tchau'' to say bye. It´s italian influence too
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Mr Bandiera
 
  1  
Reply Sat 5 Jun, 2004 09:13 am
Walter Hinteler wrote:
Quite interesting: in Europe, "ciao" is only used by Italians or those, trying to speak Italian. (My Castillian neighbour thinks, 'Chao' - Spanish teacher at the local "MBA-school" - must be English.)


In Portugal, by brazilian-italian influence, they are becoming to use ''tchau'' too
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Mr Bandiera
 
  1  
Reply Sat 5 Jun, 2004 09:15 am
fbaezer wrote:
And that's the big Argentinian trauma.
They were taught that they were Europeans living in the Americas by a twist of destiny.
They aren't.


hahahaa, the crisis in Argetina just was made to shut their mounth, they thought they were europeans, hahaha, now they know what hey are!! Twisted Evil
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bauer
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Jun, 2004 03:31 am
i think , argentina is more "european" than Europe today. Rolling Eyes
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Jun, 2004 09:26 am
Hi bauer, Welcome to A2K. I thought this forum died and gone to internet heaven. I'm not sure how successful your reprisal will be, but what do you mean by "more European" than Europe?
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Jun, 2004 10:06 am
Well - that is my question, too.


c.i., coming back to your question:

until 1901 exactly 1.795 Germans immigrated to Chile, settling primarily in Victoria, Los Sauces, Quino, Ercilla, Quillén, Lautaro, Traiguén, Contulmo, Galvarino, Salto, Temuco and Purén.

1919 some dozens from the internated warship "Dresden", other military and civil ships decide to stay in Chile.

That number is as well unknown as all the others, especially from Jews pre-1939 and those during WWII and after 1945.

Data (source) translated from the website of the German-Chilenian Federation
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Jun, 2004 10:45 am
Walter, Why did Germans want to leave their homeland in 1901? And why Chile?
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Jun, 2004 10:54 am
Those dates are just the numbers before 1901 (start of a new century, I think, they therefore choose that year).

Why Chile? No idea, besides .... 'why not Chile' :wink:
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Jun, 2004 11:03 am
Here's an interesting link on the chronology of German Americans. http://www.ulib.iupui.edu/kade/adams/chrono.html
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Jun, 2004 11:47 am
Thanks, c.i.!

Re the Jewish immigartion - here are the numbers (and countries) of
Quote:
immigrated Jews:

By September 1939, approximately 282,000 Jews had left Germany and 117,000 from annexed Austria. Of these, some 95,000 emigrated to the United States, 60,000 to Palestine, 40,000 to Great Britain, and about 75,000 to Central and South America, with the largest numbers entering Argentina, Brazil, Chile, and Bolivia. More than 18,000 Jews from the German Reich were also able to find refuge in Shanghai, in Japanese-occupied China.
Source


More general information:

THREE CENTURIES OF GERMANS IN AMERICA
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Sun 20 Jun, 2004 11:58 am
Quote:
Table C. Overseas Immigrants to Argentina by Nationality (1857-1940)

Nat. Immigrants (in thousands) Per cent
Italian 2,970 44.9%
Spanish 2,080 31.4%
Polish 180 2.7%
Turks 174 2.6%
French 239 3.6%
Russian 177 2.6%
Austro-Hungarian 111 1.6%
German 152 2.2%
Yugoslav 48 0.7%
Portuguese 65 0.9%
Swiss 44 0.6%
Belgian 26 0.3%
British 75 1.1%
Danish 18 0.2%
Dutch 10 0.1%
Swedish 7 0.1%
United States 12 0.1%
Other 223 3.3%
Total 6, 611
Source: South American Immigration: Argentina
0 Replies
 
bauer
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jun, 2004 12:56 pm
cicerone imposter wrote:
Hi bauer, Welcome to A2K. I thought this forum died and gone to internet heaven. I'm not sure how successful your reprisal will be, but what do you mean by "more European" than Europe?

meaning, that the people of argentina is predominantly of euroepean descent ,maybee 98%. thus the culture is european. while Europe is multicultural, with a mixed population.
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jun, 2004 01:46 pm
I would agree that the majority in Argentina are of European descent. Many don't know this, but Puerto Ballenas was settled by the Welsh. I didn't know this until we had a layover there on our cruise around Cape Horn, and took the optional whale watching tour in the bay. While in Buenos Aires, we visited the section called La Boca which was settled by Italian sailors.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jun, 2004 01:50 pm
bauer wrote:

meaning, that the people of argentina is predominantly of euroepean descent ,maybee 98%. thus the culture is european. while Europe is multicultural, with a mixed population.


As for as I could find out, about 97% are of (mostly Spanish and Italian)European origin.

This marks at least two groups for a "mixed population" :wink:
(Italy has more than 98% Italians - Spain -agreed- "composites of Mediterranean and Nordic types")
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 21 Jun, 2004 02:50 pm
I believe about 98 percent are Catholics.
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Xavier
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 May, 2005 10:24 am
fbaezer wrote:
I don't think the Chilean authorities are trying to hide the number of German nationals living in the country.
I don't think Chile keeps a census by race. To do that would be considered racist in most Latin American cultures. But all census that I know of count the number of foreigners.

Hiding the number of Germans would have been logical during the Pinochet regime, when there was a concentration camp, Colonia Libertad, run by German inmigrants, in which several opposers were tortured and killed.
If I remember well, the founder and leader of Colonia Libertad is in prison now.

In Chile nobody hides any numbers; Chileans are considered racially equal under the law and they do not count people like animals, by race.
As for being normal to do that during the Pinochet government, shows that you are rather ignorant in the matter because all the bad things said abroad about him and his excellent government, particularly abroad, are not true. I lived there during his regime, I have never felt more secure in my life.
Regards
Xavier
0 Replies
 
Xavier
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 May, 2005 01:15 pm
cicerone imposter wrote:
Walter, Why did Germans want to leave their homeland in 1901? And why Chile?


Why not Chile?
I lived there and it's a fantastic place to live, Southern Chile is like Bavaria.
In Santiago today is the biggest concentration of Germans. It was a very good immigration overall.
Regards.
Xavier
0 Replies
 
Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 May, 2005 01:57 pm
Since my last response on this thread, I've found some more material re this topic.

Xavier wrote:
Why not Chile?


Well, eactly that was the problem of the Chilenean government in at about 1850:
around 1.5 million Germans left the German countries about that time, and Chile was noticing a decline of immigrants at the same time.

So, Vicente Pérez Rosales and Benjamin Vicuña Makenna were 'preparing' a comfortable situation for German in Chile, while Philippi and Franz Kindermann pushed people to immigrate to Chile in Germany.

http://img244.echo.cx/img244/5671/tabelleeinwanderungchile1mo.jpg

As early as 1526 Emperor Charles V gave Chile as a present to the noble merchant dynasty of the Fuggers (Augsburg/Germany).
However, they never took this right.

Later, some dozens of German missionaries, adventourers and explorers from Germany arrived over the years (the town 'Viña de Mar' is on the grounds of former German vineyards), until especially in the 19th century more and more Germans arrived (see table).
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cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 May, 2005 02:40 pm
Walter, What is more interesting is the reasons why Germans left Germany in great numbers during those periods - even to the US.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  1  
Reply Mon 30 May, 2005 03:04 pm
Germans left their countries especially from 1830 onwards (with a peak about 1847); this was due to extreme crop failures (corn) and blight epidemics potatoes (all over Europe in 1846/47).

The liberation of the serfs, beginning economic freedom and the law of succession led to nuisances within broad parts of population and forced them to leave their fatherland as well.

Immigration from northern parts of Germany were reasoned by the fact that big farms were just in the hands of a few.

Other reasons were political ones as well as religious.
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