14
   

Not sure why they would own this

 
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 Jan, 2012 11:49 pm
@MMarciano,
MMarciano wrote:
You better hope you and I don't run into each other sometime.
(If u don't mind my offering a suggestion),
I recommend that u don 't beat him up, Marco (even tho u are a MARCIANO).

I have not checked, but that is probably against the law, in Florida.





David
saab
 
  0  
Reply Sat 14 Jan, 2012 02:31 am
@Butrflynet,
You could always drill some holes in the bottom and turn it into a planter, maybe fill it with a variety of Zebrina pendula aka wandering jew. Once the plant grows out, the pot won't even be visible.
-------------------------------------------------------------

Turn the Nazi china into a planter - good idea - but not so good to plant it with a wandering jew. So symbolic it is close to very bad taste.
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Sat 14 Jan, 2012 03:08 am
@saab,
saab wrote:
You could always drill some holes in the bottom and turn it into a planter,
maybe fill it with a variety of Zebrina pendula aka wandering jew.
Once the plant grows out, the pot won't even be visible.
-------------------------------------------------------------

Turn the Nazi china into a planter - good idea - but not so good to plant it with a wandering jew.
So symbolic it is close to very bad taste.
I imagine that if u Capitalize "Nazi"
then u shud also Capitalize "Jew"; don 't u think ??

That seems fair.





David
saab
 
  0  
Reply Sat 14 Jan, 2012 07:43 am
@OmSigDAVID,
I copied what Butrflynet wrote.
I have no idea if you write wandering jew, Wanderingjew, Wandering Jew or wandering Jew.
As a native American it would have been very polite of you to not only point out my mistake, but also sax what is correct.
That is how you teach. Don´t just point out mistakes. Probably you don´t know yourself how to write it correctly.
saab
 
  0  
Reply Sat 14 Jan, 2012 07:45 am
I looked it up in google: Correct is "Wandering Jew":
So you were wrong with wandering Jew. Check things before you correct somebody.
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Sat 14 Jan, 2012 07:50 am
@saab,
saab wrote:
I looked it up in google: Correct is "Wandering Jew":
So you were wrong with wandering Jew. Check things before you correct somebody.
I said nothing about "wandering"; not a word. I did not correct u about that.
Check things before you correct somebody.





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Jan, 2012 07:53 am
@saab,
saab wrote:
I copied what Butrflynet wrote.
I have no idea if you write wandering jew, Wanderingjew, Wandering Jew or wandering Jew.
I don 't write it at all.
I am not involved in botany nor in horticulture.





David
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Jan, 2012 10:54 am
@saab,
I know it as Tradescantia fluminensis, but there are two variations with the common name Wandering Jew, the first from south america and the second from Mexico, Tradescantia zebrina, aka Zebrina pendula. There is another Tradescantia with a common name of Moses in the Cradle or Moses in the Boat, T. spathacca. Interesting how common names happen. I assume that 'wandering' is based on the way the plants tend to spread. I sort of doubt the plant was named for antisemitic reasons, but then I don't know that either.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Jan, 2012 11:07 am
@ossobuco,
i am sure the name of the flower is completely innosent and so was the idea of a Wandering Jew in a flowerpot.
Just it seemed so strange to think about a Wandering Jew stuck in a nazi pot forever.
In Swedish it is also Wandering Jew - I did not know that. It is regarding the legend of the Wandering Jew.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Jan, 2012 11:37 am
@saab,
As an aside, I only called it Wandering Jew by happenstance. That is a common name for the plant, and people italicize differently. For example, Sunset's Western Garden book puts the common names all in caps for easier readibility. People like me who have specified thousands of plants use the latin name first, with the first letter of the first word capitalized; if we use common names at all, it is for the convenience of the client. Many plants share common names, so the specificity of the latin is preferable.

I just went to the garage to check a copy of an old set of plans, and I see I used to capitalize the first letter of both words of the common names, which was when I had my own firm. Checked another set, when I worked in another firm, and I used all caps for the common names; that was a large set of plans for a whole housing tract, so I probably wanted the names to stand out for the client in the morass of pages of information. There wasn't any set rule on what we had to do. If I were in practice again I'd probably change to all non capitalized letters for the common name, and keep capitalizing the first letter of the latin name, since that is the standard in botany.

With the special case of the word jew, I could go either way. I tend to not capitalize words I used to, having to do with religions or people of various countries.

On putting that plant into the gravy boat, I think would be an act of irony/humor on the part of the person who planted it, depending on the person. Could be the opposite if it was an antisemitic person, but that's not what we're talking about in this thread.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Jan, 2012 12:11 pm
@ossobuco,
In contrast to my parents I am not much of a garderner.
At a time living abroad and planning a garden I used only Latin words for plants.
This impressed the garderner. I told him that I had a Swedish book with plants and Swedish names and Latin names. As I could not find all the botanical names in a dictionary I used the Latin ones.
I capitalize names, nationalities and religions as I find it correct. But I am for a correct language as I teach languages and find one should learn to enjoy to speak it well and write it correctly.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Jan, 2012 01:50 pm
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:
I tend to not capitalize words I used to,
having to do with religions or people of various countries.
Y not capitalize all proper nouns ?????

U said: "I used to"; Y did u change ??????





David
0 Replies
 
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Jan, 2012 03:19 pm
From the website aish.com, a site for and about Judaism.

http://www.aish.com/tp/b/app/48972021.html

Quote:
Matot(Numbers 30:2-32:42)
The Wandering Jew

Any botanist will tell you that the "Wandering Jew" is a unique species of plant which - when given minimal sustenance - will nevertheless spread and grow. Similarly, if you cut out its roots and plant it in other soil, it will regenerate itself and start anew.

This plant's nomenclature is, of course, a comment on the Jewish People's ability to adapt to varied environments and conditions. "Wandering" is what Jewish history has been all about. The Patriarchs and Matriarchs were nomads. The Jewish nation itself was forged in Egypt and while wandering through the Sinai desert - the only nation ever to establish its identity while wandering outside its homeland. And for the past 2000 years we have been wandering the world.

Next week's parsha, Masay, details the Jewish wanderings through the Sinai desert. No less than 42 locations are listed as encampments throughout the 40 years in the wilderness.

The wanderings have, however, been the subject of some misunderstanding: They are often portrayed as a "shlep" from one place to another. In fact, the commentators raise several fascinating issues regarding these wanderings. First of all, why does the Torah bother to mention the names of all 42 encampments? Furthermore, why does the Torah alternately describe the travels as "going forth to journey" and "journeying to go forth?"

The commentators explain that the number 42 alludes to the mystical 42-letter name of God. This indicates that the Jewish People acquired a greater spiritual awareness as they traveled through the desert. The Chasam Sofer, a great 19th century sage, offers some examples: At Kivrot Hataiva (literally "burial of desire"), they learned to confront their desires. At Chatzerot (literally "courtyards"), they understood the concept that "this world is a courtyard to the next world." Thus, the entire desert experience was a journey of growth, incorporating new elements of insight into the collective Jewish consciousness.

Rabbi Shimshon Rafael Hirsch suggests that the Torah's differing description of the wanderings - "journeying to go forth" versus "going forth to journey" - reflects different attitudes among the Jews of that time. To some, the purpose of "going forth" was "to journey" -to a goal of new growth. For others, the purpose of the "journey" was to simply "go forth" - to relieve the challenge of their present condition.

The Sfas Emes, a great 19th century Chassidic master, explains that each of these 42 places offered a unique challenge to the Jewish People. In each place, the Jews were to accomplish a specific tikkun, a "spiritual repair." Just as the Israelites' leaving Egypt had eternal significance, so too the Jewish People met challenges at their 42 encampments!

The Sfas Emes explains that we all have various stations -good and bad - as we travel through the "journey of life." Each has its unique purpose and challenge. And each can help us achieve the repairs we must accomplish on our souls.

As we embark on the various journeys that create the tapestry of our lives, it is important to remain focused on the exciting goals we are moving towards. In that way, with God's help, we will find the strength and courage to stand up to the myriad of challenges life may present.
saab
 
  1  
Reply Sat 14 Jan, 2012 03:28 pm
@Butrflynet,
Thank you - that was very interesting to read.
0 Replies
 
MMarciano
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Jan, 2012 11:06 am
@OmSigDAVID,
Oh I wouldn't hit him, just being face to face with him would be enought for him to wet himself.
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 Jan, 2012 11:28 am
@MMarciano,
MMarciano wrote:
Oh I wouldn't hit him, just being face to face with him would be enought for him to wet himself.
That can happen.
My former law partner used to represent the NYC Police union.
He told me of litigation arising from someone witnessing a police officer
take his gun out and hand it to his partner, when he was going to break up a fight.
The witness was so alarmed at the sight of the gun, that he befouled his clothing and brought suit (no pun).

It has been implied that he is jealous of u.
I guess that 's kind of an honor, right ?





David
0 Replies
 
 

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