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How to speak the kings english?

 
 
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 04:06 am
For simplicities sake just keep it genuine and simple!
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Type: Discussion • Score: 14 • Views: 8,337 • Replies: 82

 
Alot to learn
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 04:08 am
@Alot to learn,
Should this all consist of running in circles?
Alot to learn
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 04:11 am
@Alot to learn,
How many more laps coach? infinity?
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  0  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 04:24 am
Oh, how silly and inconsiderate of us. We have nothing better to do all day than to sit, with breath abated, waiting for some vague and ambiguous question to be asked, so that we can leap to conclusions about what it's supposed to mean.

What king would that be, by the way? I'm sure Queen Elizabeth would be bemused by that question.
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 04:34 am
@Setanta,
Perhaps it's English as spoken in Kings County (AKA Brooklyn).

What's it to ya?
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 05:09 am
@jespah,
Now do you know that's not King's County, Virginia--you geographical bigot . . .
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 05:34 am
@Setanta,
I am exposed.

And damn, it's chilly to be doin' that!
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 06:09 am
@jespah,
Yeah . . . and Region might get pissed, too . . .
roger
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 06:15 am
@Setanta,
Is Region anything like Religiom?
maxdancona
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 06:15 am

0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 06:18 am
@roger,
Yes, but horribly foreshortened . . .
0 Replies
 
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 07:55 am
@Alot to learn,
http://youtu.be/R2nI_3VBEtA
0 Replies
 
Questioner
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 08:41 am
I believe proper "King's" English largely involves stuffing one's self up their own ass whilst making up funky new ways to say old words in order to impress the French.

Or maybe I'm thinking about Jersey and Reality TV Viewers.
0 Replies
 
oristarA
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 09:14 am
@jespah,
jespah wrote:

Perhaps it's English as spoken in Kings County (AKA Brooklyn).

What's it to ya?


I believe he refers to King James English.

Here is the classIcial way of speaking KJE:

http://www.wordproject.org/kj/03/1.htm


jespah
 
  3  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 09:15 am
@roger,
roger wrote:
Is Region anything like Religiom?


Regiom Philbiz, my husband's evil twin brother.
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 09:15 am
@oristarA,
I know. My post was a joke, oristarA. Smile
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 09:53 am
@oristarA,
oristarA wrote:
I believe he refers to King James English.


This is false. The current expression should properly be the Queen's English, because the monarch is currently a woman, Queen Elizabeth II. There is precedent for this, as well. Writing in 1600, Shakespeare refers to "the Queen's English." The monarch in 1600 was a woman, Queen Elizabeth. The language is, in this phrase, spoken of as the possession of the monarch, in the sense of guardianship, or trusteeship. Therefore, it is only the King's English when the monarch is a man. It is generally taken to be English as it is spoken by an educated person in the south of England, and in particular, in the home counties, outside metropolitan London (where no one can be sure whose English is being spoken).
thack45
 
  3  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 10:09 am
@Setanta,
I say, old bean... Bob's your uncle.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 10:11 am
Fortunately, i speak the American language. I am greatly entertained, too, by the response of Brit's to the use of the expression "the American language."
fresco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 5 Jan, 2012 10:14 am
@Setanta,
Close ! Replace "educated" with "privileged" and that's a reasonable description. Nowadays, speaking with that accent can have negative social consequences.
 

 
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