10
   

Like us on Facebook for a chance to....

 
 
Robert Gentel
 
  5  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2011 09:49 am
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:
So, if you "like" New Yorker it would target ads to your "friends" or would it target New Yorker to advertise in general somewhere on Facebook?


That kind of thing can happen but anything like that is incidental to them. They don't get to target ads (real Facebook ads, not posts that are promotional) to your friends without paying and they can pay for ads without anyone liking them (though the likes help the conversion rate as friends who liked products are displayed in the creatives).

So think of it just like an appeal to sign up for a catalogue or a newsletter. It's really that simple for them, the advertising ecosystem around them is Facebook's motivation, not theirs. Their motivation is really just "subscribe to my promotional messages".

Quote:
What doesn't make sense (to me) is that an advertiser would require me to take the extra steps required to "like" something. These are companies where I spend money and they're kind of pissing me off with these new emails.

I guess it's kind of like a manufacturer's coupon with Facebook being the manufacturer.


It's kind of dumb that they already have you as a captive audience and are just trying to get you captivated in a different medium, but it makes sense due to the other factors people here have described, in that on Facebook the fact that you are a part of their audience can be rebroadcast to your own Facebook audience, thereby increasing their Facebook audience. Because of that having you in the Facebook medium is more valuable to them than in email. You are much less likely to rebroadcast email but Facebook is setup to rebroadcast a lot of your activity so if you then interact with them on Facebook their audience is extended to your own subscribers (depending on the settings as ehBeth has noted).

So while it seems like a pointless hoop to you that's their whole point to them, the contests likely exist for the sole purpose of increasing the eyeballs on social marketing mediums. Not that they are not being wrong-headed about it, or too aggressive. I have no idea. I'm just saying that the "like us for a chance at X" is not just red tape to them, it's the entire point of the exercise. Like when a2k gave away hats on FB/Twitter. We could easily have given them away here but we were trying to establish our accounts (and like ehBeth said, you need 25 people to like you on Facebook before you can do some things there) and the whole point of sending those out was to get a bit more attention to those accounts (though in a2k's case it was much more for experimentation than real marketing as a2k lacks resources for marketing).
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  3  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2011 09:56 am
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:
I think it's about the "a gazillion people like us" tag on their Facebook page. It has the same benefit as a Google "results" count or an Amazon sales rank. It's crude but easy-to-mine data, showing that the company and its products matter to someone.


Good point, Google is actually one of the people mining that signal to influence Google results. They are ranking the influence of different people on social networks and those with a larger audience are given more weight, more "authority". But it's not as simple as the number, of course, otherwise you could just create a bunch of accounts to follow yourself. The key thing they are mining out of the graph is watching a message reverberate and so it's things like how many times your message is rebroadcast that counts most to them.

But many other people are really just all about the number, just like in SEO how many were just all about the page rank. It's very true that for many "social media marketers" they see the number of followers as the goal itself with a lot of navel-gazing about how big one's audience is.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2011 10:02 am
@Thomas,
Thomas wrote:
boomerang wrote:
I'm just curious as to what benefit my "like" has for the company.

I think it's about the "a gazillion people like us" tag on their Facebook page. It has the same benefit as a Google "results" count or an Amazon sales rank. It's crude but easy-to-mine data, showing that the company and its products matter to someone. It looks good to potential future investors and customers. Also, your "like" vote brings their company to your friends' attention so they might check it out as well.


Good points all . . . Farmville claims to have over 33,000,000 people playing. However, my experience is that between a third and a half of the people on my neighbors list are not active players. Twenty-five millions players would still be a very impressive number, but naturally Zynga is gonna go with the biggest number they can claim.

You're absolutely right, of course, about liking. The ads on the right hand side of the page when i go there list people from my friends list, and then the total they claim. I just went to Farmville (by Zynga) and at the top it says: Mr. X and Miss Y "and 33,515,968 others like this."
0 Replies
 
jespah
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2011 11:01 am
@Robert Gentel,
Robert Gentel wrote:

That's not accurate, Facebook let's them target ads to demographics but lets them do so to anyone, regardless of whether you liked them and liking them doesn't help them in this way, it helps Facebook that way. Facebook then uses this data to target ads, but the companies asking you to like them are almost always doing so because they want eyeballs, it's almost never for the demographic data (which is more useful to Facebook.

Once you "like" them, they can send free ads to you instead of having to pay for the demographically targeted ones. You are subscribing to their ads and that is their motivation, it's almost never data collection but a free audience for promotional posts.


A few other things.

It generally takes a good 7 views of something before someone actually plunks down cash and buys it, whether online or off. With the "like", you are getting a company's stream and, as such, they are serving a view or 2 to you. This doesn't mean, of course, that EVERY time you see something 7 times, you buy it. It's more like, people hem and haw as they look. So they are giving you a few more peeks.

Social media marketers (whether formal or informal) are also looking to generate some buzz and conversation. If you see a cute ad or something such as that, you might talk about it (e. g. remember the Old Spice ads?). Even offline, your talking about something is another "view" (never mind that there isn't anything visual. It's more that it's another nudge to you).

There have also been some studies on the quantification of fans and likes but I don't think those #s are accurate or, if they are, they probably aren't accurate for terribly long. It used to be, if I am recalling correctly, that a "like" was worth something like $70 (I doubt that # is right).

Plus #s add up and people do tend to follow a herd mentality. 5 likes? Meh. 50 likes? Interesting. 5,000 likes? It MUST be awesome. Smile

Plus the act of liking goes into your stream. You hear that 17 of your friends liked something, so you check it out. Again, it's another serving, another view.
Linkat
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2011 11:20 am
@boomerang,
I'd agree - to me this "liking" things causes some people to "unlike" them in a sense. I don't have a facebook account so I can't get those discounts or coupons. Kind of makes me want to use a company that doesn't require me to like them in order to get a coupon/discount.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2011 12:57 pm
@jespah,
jespah wrote:
There have also been some studies on the quantification of fans and likes but I don't think those #s are accurate or, if they are, they probably aren't accurate for terribly long. It used to be, if I am recalling correctly, that a "like" was worth something like $70 (I doubt that # is right).


I think your doubt is warranted. Ever since they've been around I've seen them on sale for cents (there are market places where you can buy votes, youtube views etc). The most I've ever seen them offered for on any meaningful scale was about $1.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2011 01:02 pm
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:
Why would an advertiser want me to have to take an extra step?


I was trying to explain that for them that extra step was the entire point of the exercise. Their goal was to transfer some of their captive audience to another medium and the promotion was the means and not the end.

Quote:
For example: the other day I got an email from a Halloween store. Since I was going to be going over there anyway I opened the email to see if they had a coupon. They did -- but you had to "like" them in order to get the coupon. I ended up going to a different store where I knew all of their Halloween stuff would be on sale.


I can't vouch for the wisdom of their strategy but it really does sound like they are trying to exchange your eyeballs for the coupon. Looks like it didn't work out well for them in your case but I understand their motivations for it.
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  2  
Reply Tue 1 Nov, 2011 01:05 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:
Their strategies may not always be effective. I am often hilariously amused at some of the stupidity of "tech-savvy" people when dealing with the real world.

I said my examples was simplistic, and i wasn't claiming it was an accurate representation of exactly what goes on there.


So why get so bent about it being pointed out as inaccurate?

Quote:
But to claim they don't mine demographic information would be hilariously stupid. If advertisers did not pay attention to the reaction to their products and advertising, they would be hilariously stupid. I suspect that ad agencies who do hilariously stupid things online last about as long with their customers as do agencies who make horrible gaffes in print or in broadcasting.


Nobody claimed they don't mine demographic information, it's just almost invariably not at all the point of them getting you to like their page. Free advertising is, the demographically targeted advertising on Facebook they have to pay for.

Anyway, carry on. It was a minor quibble with what you had posted and not worth wasting much time on.
Setanta
 
  -2  
Reply Wed 2 Nov, 2011 03:54 am
@Robert Gentel,
And yet you've wasted so much time on it.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Nov, 2011 04:12 am
@boomerang,
I joined it at the behest of the NRA,
but I don 't feel well informed qua how to use Facebook.





David
Region Philbis
 
  3  
Reply Wed 2 Nov, 2011 05:12 am
@OmSigDAVID,

perhaps they can shoot you some instructions...
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Nov, 2011 05:17 am
Har har har
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 2 Nov, 2011 09:27 am
@Region Philbis,
Region Philbis wrote:
perhaps they can shoot you some instructions...
OK, but not the instructors.





David
0 Replies
 
JosephObrien
 
  1  
Reply Thu 19 Apr, 2012 01:03 am
@boomerang,
Nice interesting competition!!!! I wish all the best..
0 Replies
 
 

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