19
   

What is the single most important invention in European history?

 
 
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Jul, 2011 02:18 am
@gungasnake,
gungasnake wrote:

Calculus...

Without the printing press, nobody would know about calculus, probably would have been forgotten ten years after isaak Newton's and the Baron Leibnitz's deaths...


The Bible managed to spread pretty well before Gutenberg. And a bunch of other handwritten literature, too, as well as scientific knowledge and philosophical works. The spread may have been slower, but I don't see any reason to think it would've been forgotten...so much else wasn't. Any scientist or mathemetician worth his/her salt would've preserved and propagated it. It needn't have been on the public's bestsellers list. As long as the scientists had it...
gungasnake
 
  0  
Reply Mon 4 Jul, 2011 02:23 am
Another candidate for most major invention or at least second, third, or fourth place:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watermill

The humble watermill might have been the thing which put Europe over the top in dealing with slammites and the like prior to and after Lepanto. I.e. no real way to have a watermill out in the deserts where most slammites live or to produce the kinds of things (including weapons) which Europeans started producing in the late middle ages, several centuries before the steam engine.


Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Mon 4 Jul, 2011 02:50 am
@gungasnake,
The first known watermills were found in Mesopotamia at about 1200 BC (and later in India and elsewhere in Arabia).

The first mentioning of a water mill in Europe is by the Greek epigrammatist Antipater of Thessalonica, 1st century BC.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Jul, 2011 03:26 am
I'd say the essential lesson of this thead is that there is nothing new under the sun.
0 Replies
 
gungasnake
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Jul, 2011 05:46 am
@Walter Hinteler,
What seems to be the key sentence in the wiki article:

Quote:
Noticeable is the preeminent role of France in the introduction of new innovative uses of waterpower.


Like I mentioned, that might have been a main key to the rise of Europe vis a vis the muslim world.
Walter Hinteler
 
  3  
Reply Mon 4 Jul, 2011 05:51 am
@gungasnake,
From your source:
Quote:
Largely unaffected from the turbulent political events following the demise of the Western Roman Empire, the importance of watermilling continued to grow under the new Germanic lords.

Like I mentioned before, you have no idea of history. And obviously, you're not responding to the thread here.
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Mon 4 Jul, 2011 11:45 am
@Walter Hinteler,
Walter, I had the opportunity to visit Thessaloniki when I did a tour of the Balkans to trace Alexander the Great's history; to visit his birthplace and his father's tomb. That tour was long gone from my memory bank until I read your post.
0 Replies
 
oolongteasup
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jul, 2011 02:31 am
@FBM,
Watch your language, best sellers were important too.
FBM
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jul, 2011 05:28 am
@oolongteasup,
Not dissing bestsellers, buy how often do books on cutting-edge mathematics make the list? Wink
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 5 Jul, 2011 05:43 am
@FBM,
the correct answer is still Iron Bloom
0 Replies
 
 

Related Topics

THE BRITISH THREAD II - Discussion by jespah
FOLLOWING THE EUROPEAN UNION - Discussion by Mapleleaf
The United Kingdom's bye bye to Europe - Discussion by Walter Hinteler
Amanda Knox - Discussion by ossobuco
Sinti and Roma: History repeating - Discussion by Walter Hinteler
[B]THE RED ROSE COUNTY[/B] - Discussion by Mathos
Leaving today for Europe - Discussion by cicerone imposter
So you think you know Europe? - Discussion by nimh
 
Copyright © 2019 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 12/06/2019 at 02:20:11