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Do you agree with buying wow gold online?

 
 
pooling
 
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 03:06 am
My younger brother want to buy some online. He asked me to give him the money. So I'm wondering is it appropriate for a high school student spend money on buying WoW gold? What will you do if your brother asks you?
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Type: Question • Score: 0 • Views: 3,356 • Replies: 22
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Region Philbis
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 03:10 am
@pooling,

i don't have a brother...
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 04:03 am
@Region Philbis,
wtf is WoW gold and how different is it from 24K gold?
Region Philbis
 
  2  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 05:15 am
@farmerman,

WoW stands for World of Warcraft, a massively multiplayer online role-playing game (MMORPG).

that's all i got...
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 06:53 am
@Region Philbis,
So, all this gold is actually virtual and no money will change hands?
The only thing I know about these MM's is that they can occupy vast amounts oftime of ones life. (Not unlike some BBB;s we know eh?)
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 07:03 am
Don't kid yourself, MMORPG's are big money. I suspect that there are quite a few people who sell virtual gold for real money. I've known people who sign up for MMORPG's, create new characters, develop their skills, and the sell the character, for real money, to some clown who can't be bothered to create and develop their own characters. Sometimes these characters sell for thousands of dollar. One of my friends created a character, ran him up to level 20, and sold him for $1500. That took him about ten days of playing at night after work, something he would have done anyway.

EDIT: Level 20 ain't ****--my buddy didn't even break a sweat.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 07:11 am
@Setanta,
THat all went over my head. The only thing I know about these typ of rolegames is when the cast of "South PArk" went on a quest to destroy some dweeb who was killing all the other gamers.
All the "gamer" stereotypes were presented. My one kid was into dungeons and dragons years ago and it got a bit obsessive . He outgrew it and took up carpentry and bikes.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 07:33 am
Most RPG's, at least originally, were inspired by D&D. There was a popular RPG series in the 1990s using a game system known as the Infinity Engine, with very successful titles such as Baldur's Gate, Icewind Dale and Neverwinter Nights. They had puchased the right to use the D&D system from Wizards of the Coast, who own the rights. Neverwinter Nights was actually the original MMORPG on Yahoo, but it didn't take off at the time because the interweb wasn't then the monster that it is today. The company which published the Infinity Engine games bought the rights to NN, and had a modest success selling it for a PC platform.

In the late 1990s, and especially from 2000 onward, the nickel dropped for online entrepreneurs who were willing to make the capital outlay for servers and programming (code writing). Several games became big online, such as World of Warcraft (which can also be purchased for a PC platform). Some online games aren't even role playing games, some of them are simulation games, inspired by the original, grandaddy--Sim City. The people who ran the games were willing to sell advantages, such as artifact items to further the players game quests, for real cash. Players soon got into selling things themselves, and i believe it first really took off in the big online sim games (someone else more knowledgeable will know that). Some of these are real exploitation mills. One of those is Evony, which was offered at Facebook for a while, until it got booted. Apparently (i never even looked at it, never mind played it), to get anywhere in the game, you needed stuff which was extremely difficult to get, but the game provider would sell it to you, for real money. I believe Evony got a really bad rep for that, but i didn't keep track of it.

Even the relatively simple and innocent games like Cafe World or Farmville at Facebook will allow you to buy things with "cafe cash" or "farm cash," which only accrue very slowly, but which can be purchased with real money. I've seen people complete projects in a matter of hours which would take me all day, or more than one day, and i'm pretty good at these games (they use the same skills i developed to a high degree when i was a freelance small business manager). Those people were obviously whipping out their credit cards and purchasing virtual money which allowed them to purchase "success."

The biggest cash i've heard of changing hands has been in the sim games and in MMORPGs. I've read of people who will pay thousands of dollars for a character which has been developed to level 30 or higher. (In a role playing game, your character starts out at level one or level zero, and you develop them by playing the game. It's relatively easy to "level up" at the beginning, but it gets harder. It's easier to go from level one to level twenty than it is to go from level twenty to level thirty.) Lazy people who just want to look cool online, and with more money than sense will pay thousands of dollars to buy a character someone else has developed. I've heard of a joker who paid $15,000 dollars for a character in a sim game.

My buddy offered his character at an online forum for the game, with instuctions to go to Craig's List. He gave Craig's List a "packet" which contained the user name and password for the character he had created and develped. When Craig's List verified the payment (Pay Pal or someone like that), they sent the packet to the puchaser, who could now go online, use the user name and password (which they were well advised to change) and suddenly be a "cool" guy in the game. Of course, level twenty isn't reall that high, but for someone lazy, it's a good start, and maybe that's all the buyer thought he could afford. My buddy banked the $1500, and he was a happy camper.
whitesnow10
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 07:39 am
@pooling,
it depends what he wants to buy, if something is useful for him, I will . if not, I won't !
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 07:42 am
@Setanta,
I can see vast amounts of time (unrecoverable) in playing out these roles . Virtual worlds can be somewhat seductive cause they build on myth or high tech or futuristics.
I liked the old Sym City , course my way of thinking was always to the infrastructure first.

I dont think Id like Farm world (or whatever its called). Theres too many day to day "real-life farm" variables that get smooshed over if Farmworld is anything like what SYm city was about.
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 07:58 am
@farmerman,
Cafe World and Farmville are both totally unrealistic. But the test of a game is whether or not it is internallyconsistent. I like the PC platform RPGs, as long as the rules are the same for your enemies. The infinity engine games relied on magic, and they were good games because the rules of magic were consistent. If your opponent casts an area affect spell like fire ball (an explosion of magical fire in a certain area), if his own people are in the area of effect, and they suffer damage just as your people would, then that's internally consistent, and i can deal with that.

In war gaming (which i've been doing on board games and later with PC games since i got my first game in 1959), when the game is good, preparing your base and refining your logistics is half the battle, or more. That's the same as building your infrastructure in Sim City (which i frankly found boring). There's a German-Austrian company which has made some good strategic games which are a blend of the strategic and the simulation games. You sail into the "new world," you establish a colony, and you build it up. You have to feed your people and educate them to get access to more sophisticated technologies. So, you'll set up your colony, give your people food and goods they want, build a school and later a university, to improve their technology. When they can do iron ore mining, you set up an iron ore mine and a smelter, and then you can start building weapons. I enjoy the PC platform games because you're playing against the computer, and not some whiner who will bail. Back in the 1960s, i played board games by mail. Two out of three opponents would bail out as soon as the going got rough, and especially when it became apparently (or they thought so) that they were going to lose. By the time we got to PC gaming, i really had no interst in MMORPGs for just that reason. My buddy who sold the character told me that a lot of people bail out when the going gets rough. I have no interest in building a character, acquiring the artifact items to give them good equipment and come up against a slew of enemis only to find that half my party has bailed because it looks like being rough. I stick to the PC games.
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 08:08 am
@whitesnow10,
Do you play World of Warcraft online?
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 08:14 am
By the way, FM, Facebook games are about the only reason i come here any longer. I get up in the morning, look at the schedule (i can remember this stuff in my head, another advantage when i managed small businesses), but The Girl needs to have it written down. Since between us we have three accounts, which means three cafes and six farms, i need it written down, too, if i'm going to do more than just my own stuff. So, i fire up the pomcuter, go online, and start visiting cafes and farms according to the schedule--and i look in here in between, and while waiting for stuff to load. To make it interesting for me, i'm also playing an RPG which i can minimize when there's FB **** to do, or if i want to post here. You'll usually see me slowing down in the afternoon, and bailing out altogether in late afternoon.

Well, i've got some bandits to go kill, so, later dude.
farmerman
 
  2  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 09:30 am
@Setanta,
Interesting potential topic. I am usually doing several things but during the day its usually data compilation and surfing for various maps for areas Im working.
Idrop in on A2K as an intermediate thing while stuff is printing out on the flat bed.

Last couple of days I tried A 2 K' ing while I snakked at road stops or hillsides when I was tired ( or as they say in the Smokies "IzeTard"). No luck, there wasnt a signal for my iphone to catch up. Im thimking of getting one of those antenna boosters from C Crane. Its a wifi booster but the nearest wifi from me was Chatanooga about 70miles SW.

A2K is kinda lame these days and the topics arent as much fun as once they were. (Maybe its me). Ive gotten less patient with some of the varied personnae, and a few of the topics Im interested in seem to have been taken over by aliens.
Setanta
 
  2  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 10:32 am
@farmerman,
Quote:
. . . seem to have been taken over by aliens.


All your base are belong to us . . .
0 Replies
 
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 10:36 am
There are so many people here who are either idiots, or poseurs or who just want to pick a fight. I'm done with banging my head against a growing array of brick walls. I'm doing the last farm for several hours, so i'll be checking out of here--probably for the rest of the day.
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 12:41 pm
@Setanta,
youre too early for milking and its too wet for field work. Usually on days like this, Id drive into the Tractor Supply and buy ****. In LAncaster, we have the only Tractor Supply (on the planet) that has a sushi shop nextdoor.


I agree about the goons on here. Im slowly looking for somewhere else to go but the pure science forums are usually "recite athons" by researchers who want to discuss their specific areas of interest. SO, I look around for an art discussion board, a woodworking board, or a bluewater boating board.
0 Replies
 
Cycloptichorn
 
  2  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 12:49 pm
@Setanta,
Setanta wrote:

By the way, FM, Facebook games are about the only reason i come here any longer. I get up in the morning, look at the schedule (i can remember this stuff in my head, another advantage when i managed small businesses), but The Girl needs to have it written down. Since between us we have three accounts, which means three cafes and six farms, i need it written down, too, if i'm going to do more than just my own stuff. So, i fire up the pomcuter, go online, and start visiting cafes and farms according to the schedule--and i look in here in between, and while waiting for stuff to load. To make it interesting for me, i'm also playing an RPG which i can minimize when there's FB **** to do, or if i want to post here. You'll usually see me slowing down in the afternoon, and bailing out altogether in late afternoon.

Well, i've got some bandits to go kill, so, later dude.


Those games are total crack. Zynga has figured out the formula for stringing users along just enough to keep them going. And going...

Cycloptichorn
Setanta
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 May, 2011 03:13 am
@Cycloptichorn,
I don't really find them to be crack, although it does appear to me that they function that way for some people. For me, it's the RPGs i play while i'm doing the online **** that are the crack. PC platform or MMO, i totally agree that some games can be crack.
0 Replies
 
oralloy
 
  1  
Reply Wed 8 Aug, 2012 05:45 am
@farmerman,
farmerman wrote:
So, all this gold is actually virtual and no money will change hands?
The only thing I know about these MM's is that they can occupy vast amounts of time of ones life. (Not unlike some BBB;s we know eh?)


The gold in the video game is virtual. But actual money would change hands. The idea is that someone would pay real-world money in exchange for being given a supply of virtual gold that they can use to play the game with.

Doing this is a severe violation of the game's terms of service. Selling or buying gold this way will get you banned from the game if you are caught.

It is also not cool, as the institutions that sell the gold, get it by hacking into people's accounts and stealing all their stuff.

---

Blizzard is trying a different tack with their new game Diablo III.

Since they've been unable to stamp out the illegal gold sellers in WOW, they've tried to create a legal marketplace for selling things in Diablo III. They take a cut of all the transactions, of course.
 

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