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should we care about tomorrow?

 
 
Reply Mon 16 May, 2011 03:20 pm
why should we worry about the future- even as imminent as it is
It is more important to realize the affects and results of what we do today, and how these actions will impact what we do tomorrow or in the future
how simple is it to live and thrive in present time, when our minds are convoluted constantly by so much information and factual dogma
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Type: Question • Score: 6 • Views: 3,117 • Replies: 31
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View best answer, chosen by Tifinden
JLNobody
 
  2  
Reply Mon 16 May, 2011 06:17 pm
@Tifinden,
I do make practical preparations for possible tomorrows, but without emotion. I like to invest emotion in what is happening right now, even if that means reminiscing in the present about the past.
I do have a fanciful ideal however: to live each day as if yesterday were my last. That way the present is essentially all cream.
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 May, 2011 07:45 pm
@Tifinden,
The english structure you used was poor enough that I couldn't quite work out what you were saying.

Living in the present is wonderful, and it's built upon a solid foundation of who you are. Becoming the very best that you can be is done in the present, knowing that you are 'building' towards a better you. It is the same with everything in the future - you put in place the structures that will serve you better in the future, while always living in the present.

A lot of people think that to live in the present involves ignoring the future, but the future is built in the present - so acknowledging the future, and building towards the future, does not prevent one from living in the present (though many people find it distracting when they worry, rather than build)
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 May, 2011 07:53 pm
@JLNobody,
I said that wrong. Instead of "all cream" I meant to say "all gravy". Does that make a difference?
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 May, 2011 07:57 pm
Sustainability is development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs. In order to do this we should;
Protect what we have.
Manage how we develop and share what we learn.
Minimise what we leave.
0 Replies
 
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Mon 16 May, 2011 10:21 pm
@JLNobody,
Pssst JL, my reply was to tiffinden (if you thought I was replying to you)
0 Replies
 
Tifinden
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 06:38 am
@JLNobody,
It depends on the discretion of your taste buds!
0 Replies
 
Tifinden
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 06:47 am
@vikorr,
Thank you for the approval of my forum, firstly. Secondly, despite the fact that my english structure is convoluted frequently by a pretentious and eloquent vocabulary and recondite ideas which are expanded in an equivocal manner, the thematic topic should still protrude with reasonable clarity. Sorry, however I must confess that I do not wholly concur with your statement, 'Becoming the very best that you can be is done in the present' because I believe that you do not achieve yourself until the next day. If we could achieve all of our numerous aspirations in the present, the next day and the future would be rendered completely obsolete. Once again, I only slightly disagree in fine with your statement. The future is quite important, yet when is it prudent to worry ostensibly about the future, when there is so much to be in the present time. Perhaps, of course, that is what you were trying to convey. The future is a prospect which can convolute the spectrum of our minds, and cause us to forget the pertinent elements of today. But, in addition, the future is the result of today, so we might simply need to exude the most esteemed effort possible today with the conscious knowledge that the future will result indirectly, if not directly. Next time you reply, explain what you think about the "butterfly effect" in relation to the terms of present and future we are discussing today.
Fil Albuquerque
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 08:23 am
@Tifinden,
The Present it is itself the proof, that you achieve what you can achieve when you achieve it...
...becoming the very best that you can be is exactly what you are doing moment by moment while you are alive...the best is now !
(...caring about tomorrow is essentially a present condition...)
0 Replies
 
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 04:23 pm
The future does not exist yet and the past does not exist anymore. But the present which is full because it contains all that exists, is also empty because it results from what doesn't exist anymore and is becoming what doesn't exist yet. The full yet empty present is therefore paradoxical.
But that's only so if time is linear, and that is doubtful.
0 Replies
 
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Tue 17 May, 2011 08:07 pm
@Tifinden,
Tifinden wrote:
'Becoming the very best that you can be is done in the present' because I believe that you do not achieve yourself until the next day. If we could achieve all of our numerous aspirations in the present, the next day and the future would be rendered completely obsolete.
It appears you did not understand what I was saying - which is fine, because I gave it very little explanation.
JL hit on part of it :
JLNobody wrote:
The future does not exist yet and the past does not exist anymore. But the present which is full because it contains all that exists,
0 Replies
 
hamilton
  Selected Answer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 May, 2011 08:35 am
@Tifinden,
Tifinden wrote:

why should we worry about the future- even as imminent as it is
It is more important to realize the affects and results of what we do today, and how these actions will impact what we do tomorrow or in the future
how simple is it to live and thrive in present time, when our minds are convoluted constantly by so much information and factual dogma




uhh...

duh.
Chights47
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 May, 2011 01:06 pm
@Tifinden,
Tifinden wrote:

why should we worry about the future- even as imminent as it is
It is more important to realize the affects and results of what we do today, and how these actions will impact what we do tomorrow or in the future
how simple is it to live and thrive in present time, when our minds are convoluted constantly by so much information and factual dogma


If you actually think about it, we never really do anything in the present. The only thing that would could do, would "be". As humans, we never actually do an action. For example lets taking actively walking. Most people think that you're doing it, that it's in the present. If you break it down though, we're actually planning each step that we take and expect the ground to stay there so that we can take the step after that, and it just loops until we stop. So there's really only a "present" if you generalize...regardless though, to answer you question, I believe that we should examine the time around us (past and future), like a "water ripple". We should focus most on what's cloest to where we are in life, and them spread out from there.
JLNobody
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 May, 2011 02:36 pm
@Chights47,
The phenomenology of "lived" time is hard to describe. It seems to me that any present action is performed in the immediate future, and when I examine that ("present") action I'm looking at the immediate past. I cannot "grasp" the present; yet it is where all exists. This is, of course, the trap of language.
Tifinden
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 May, 2011 02:57 pm
@hamilton,
Pity, Noah, it seems as though your linguistic grace, if ever there was any, has diminished profusely to the stage of unintelligence. Shall we escort you to immediate care, or would you prefer to remain here, blabberin senseless and ambiguous phrases at an educated line of superiors? Think this over, ponder, and attempt next time for modestly more acceptable and respectable word-choice and allocution.
0 Replies
 
Chights47
 
  1  
Reply Wed 18 May, 2011 05:34 pm
@JLNobody,
JLNobody wrote:

The phenomenology of "lived" time is hard to describe. It seems to me that any present action is performed in the immediate future, and when I examine that ("present") action I'm looking at the immediate past. I cannot "grasp" the present; yet it is where all exists. This is, of course, the trap of language.


"lived" time, is actually easy to describe, it's the past. I understand what you mean though, the time between past and present, I would call it "live" time personally, but same thing I think.
0 Replies
 
vikorr
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 May, 2011 04:51 am
@Chights47,
Quote:
If you actually think about it, we never really do anything in the present. The only thing that would could do, would "be". As humans, we never actually do an action. For example lets taking actively walking. Most people think that you're doing it, that it's in the present. If you break it down though, we're actually planning each step that we take and expect the ground to stay there so that we can take the step after that, and it just loops until we stop. So there's really only a "present" if you generalize...regardless though, to answer you question, I believe that we should examine the time around us (past and future), like a "water ripple". We should focus most on what's cloest to where we are in life, and them spread out from there.
Hi Chights - I think what you'll find you're saying here is that 'we use the past and the present to project our future course'. Our present (to use your example) 'step forward' is taken using past 'experience' (the habit of walking, the 'knowledge' that the ground will stay where we have seen it, etc) to take that step foward in 'knowledge' of what is to come. That step itself is done in the present...presumably what you mean by just 'being'.

Thoughts themselves cannot be done in anything but the present. Actions cannot be done in anything but the present. But the thoughts can take into account the past and present, and project the future, and thereby arrive at a determination for the action we take.
Chights47
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 May, 2011 09:39 am
@vikorr,
Thoughts and actions can only be conceived in the present, but everything with our consciouness is always done with some measure of forward thinking. So consciously we are always in the future and never in the present. The only way I can possible fathom anyone be-ing in the present, would be to either meditate with a level of almost absolute perfection, or to be brain dead...either way, there would be very little (if any) thoughts or actions.

So what I think you're saying is that everything is done in the present, but we still don't do anything in the present. You could break down any action to any fraction of time you wanted and there would still be no actual sense of "present" in our minds.
hamilton
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 May, 2011 10:26 am
to fully understand the past is to fully understand the present, to fully understand the present is to fully understand the future...
Tifinden
 
  1  
Reply Sat 21 May, 2011 06:08 pm
@hamilton,
not exactly, because, the present varies greatly from the past, and this is likewise with the present and the future. If you understand the past, you are likely to misinterpret the future, and when you discover purpose within the present, you forget the presence of the future, and the cycle, between past, present, and the future, continues infinitely. Fine attempt, however, "Hamilton".
 

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