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What jobs allow me to do abstract math?

 
 
Reply Sat 9 Apr, 2011 02:56 pm
I hate my current job. It is not stimulating. I wish I can do abstract math for money. For hubby, I always write down equations, and solve math problems. I really want to get the hell out of my ******* job. Currently, I make about 200K working for Goldman. What a **** **** company. They have shitty policy, and long hours for their wage. It is all blood money. I want to be a math professor, so that people can leave the **** away from me. People constantly bother me with their retarded questions. I ******* hate new york, and I ******* hate lawyers. Shot everyone is will be fine with me, since they are all dogs to me. I want to tired each of them up, cut their meat off, and feed it them their ******* meat. Pricks...
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Type: Question • Score: 8 • Views: 6,416 • Replies: 34

 
Fido
 
  -1  
Reply Sat 9 Apr, 2011 03:29 pm
@TuringEquivalent,
All math is an abstraction of reality...
Oylok
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Apr, 2011 04:45 pm
@TuringEquivalent,
Cryptography involves a lot number theory and abstract algebra, doesn't it? And in data security applications there is, at the very least, some of the same type of creative, what-possible-moves-might-my-opponent-make thinking that is required, say, in writing adversarial arguments that provide lower bounds to computer science problems.

Therefore, I think data security might be your best bet. Seems to me there's more creative problem-solving, generally, in IT careers, than in finance.

(My answers are all so much speculation. I myself would love to hear better answers to TE's question.)
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Apr, 2011 04:47 pm
@TuringEquivalent,
TuringEquivalent wrote:
I want to be a math professor, so that people can leave the **** away from me. People constantly bother me with their retarded questions.


Most math professors deal with people and their questions all day. Are you sure this is a good direction for you?
contrex
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Apr, 2011 04:58 pm
@TuringEquivalent,
TuringEquivalent wrote:
I hate my current job ... Currently, I make about 200K working for Goldman. What a **** **** company.


Yeah right like I believe you. I think it is more likely you make 15K hosing **** off toilet seats in a bus station somewhere like Bensonhurst.
Oylok
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Apr, 2011 04:59 pm
@ehBeth,
ehBeth wrote:

Most math professors deal with people and their questions all day. Are you sure this is a good direction for you?


The situation is more complicated than that.

Most Math profs deal with others who are interested in Math and in abstract thinking. And they don't generally have to deal with highly verbal, less visual, literal-minded people like lawyers. I have yet to become an actuary, but I imagine conversations with lawyers who reason very differently from actuaries must test the patience of everyone involved.

Working as a professor (or even as a tutor) puts you in a position of advantage over those you communicate with. It's less of a struggle between equals to get the last word. You have the luxury of an audience that is willing to bleed to understand your thought process.

Also, at the elite schools, I understand that research is considered the most important thing anyway. The less communicative professors therefore manage to somehow get by.
Oylok
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Apr, 2011 05:02 pm
@contrex,
contrex wrote:

TuringEquivalent wrote:
I hate my current job ... Currently, I make about 200K working for Goldman. What a **** **** company.


Yeah right like I believe you. I think it is more likely you make 15K hosing **** off toilet seats in a bus station somewhere like Bensonhurst.



So you're thinking it's more likely he works for JGoldman10 than for Goldman Sachs? Well, I must disagree with you contrex; I am willing to give people the benefit of the doubt. Wink
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Apr, 2011 05:06 pm
@Oylok,
Oylok wrote:

You have the luxury of an audience that is willing to bleed to understand your thought process.


that's more than a bit of an optimistic view of how students view professors
0 Replies
 
laughoutlood
 
  2  
Reply Sun 10 Apr, 2011 12:54 am
@Oylok,
Quote:
but I imagine conversations with lawyers


lawyers are quite logical im<ho and make great back office staff



do me a fave and post a mathematical prob germane to your studies
Oylok
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Apr, 2011 01:19 am
@laughoutlood,
laughoutlood wrote:

do me a fave and post a mathematical prob germane to your studies


Okay, but this is my last favour to you...

Define a function f(n) for integers n > 0, such that f(n) = (3n + 1) / 2, if n is odd, and f(n) = n / 2, if n is even. Prove that for any integer n > 1, the sequence (ak), recursively defined by a0 = n, and ak+1 = f(ak), reaches 1.
laughoutlood
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Apr, 2011 01:28 am
@Oylok,
what has that to do with your studies of expectation
Oylok
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Apr, 2011 01:33 am
@laughoutlood,
Oh, you didn't specify which studies...

(To anyone reading, don't attempt that last problem.)
0 Replies
 
raprap
 
  2  
Reply Sun 10 Apr, 2011 01:42 am
@Oylok,
The old (3n+1) conjecture.
Oylok
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Apr, 2011 01:47 am
@raprap,
Yeah, it's been around awhile now, I guess.
0 Replies
 
High Seas
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Apr, 2011 07:52 am
@Oylok,
Oylok wrote:

Define a function f(n) for integers n > 0, such that f(n) = (3n + 1) / 2, if n is odd, and f(n) = n / 2, if n is even. Prove that for any integer n > 1, the sequence (ak), recursively defined by a0 = n, and ak+1 = f(ak), reaches 1.

Am somewhat surprised the original poster here (who started a thread ab0ut having a degree in mathematics from a "top school") didn't already answer you:
That function is known to reach 1 for 1< n <= 19×2^58 ~~ 5.48×10^18 and as Raprap spotted right away it's an unsolved problem for all n larger than that.
0 Replies
 
High Seas
 
  2  
Reply Sun 10 Apr, 2011 08:06 am
@raprap,
There's a prize for a proof of the Collatz conjecture for all n>1. Maybe the OP here can enter "unsolved problems in mathematics" here > http://www.wolframalpha.com/
> and see how many he can solve - that's the answer to his "job" question btw, these are as "abstract" as it gets and some offer $1m prizes for solutions Smile
Quote:
196-algorithm termination problem | abc conjecture | Andrica's conjecture | Barnette's conjecture | Beal's conjecture | closing lemma | Collatz problem | de Polignac's conjecture | Eberhart's conjecture | normality of e | Erdős-Turán conjecture | irrationality of the Euler-Mascheroni constant | Fuglede's conjecture | strong Goldbach conjecture | ternary Goldbach conjecture | graph genus problem | graph isomorphism problem | Hodge conjecture | Jacobian conjecture | Keller's conjecture | Landau's fourth problem | Legendre's conjecture | linear programming problem over the reals | infinitude of Mersenne primes problem | smooth solution to the Navier-Stokes equations problem | normality of pi | principle of computational equivalence | P vs. NP problem | Quillen-Lichtenbaum conjecture | Riemann hypothesis | Scholz conjecture | Smale's fourth problem | Smale's fifth problem | Smale's sixth problem | Smale's seventh problem | Smale's eighth problem | Smale's eleventh problem | Smale's twelfth problem | Smale's thirteenth problem | Smale's fourteenth problem | Smale's seventeenth problem | Smale's eighteenth problem | subgraph homeomorphism problem | Swinnerton-Dyer conjecture | twin prime conjecture | second twin prime conjecture | strong twin prime conjecture | Wagstaff's conjecture | Yang-Mills existence and mass gap problem (total: 49)
0 Replies
 
CalamityJane
 
  4  
Reply Sun 10 Apr, 2011 11:55 am
Oy, someone needs anger management, and I agree with contrex - this guy
has nothing but foul language to offer.
0 Replies
 
Francis
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Apr, 2011 01:27 pm
Contrex wrote:
Actually, I don't have one of those


And those who have such, seldom use a sig line like yours... Laughing
0 Replies
 
High Seas
 
  2  
Reply Mon 11 Apr, 2011 03:50 am
You've been exposed as a crackpot and a fraud - if in a hole, stop digging. Leave Jane out of your delirium, but if you can still manage some continuity and coherence with your befuddled brain, can you explain why you claim to be trained in mathematics? If you persist in that claim, can you give details on it?
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