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A few questions from someone new to travel nursing

 
 
Reply Thu 10 Mar, 2011 05:24 am
I am new to this. I'm a Canadian citizen who wants to work as an RN in the US. I think I have all the paperwork (i.e. current US license and current VisaScreen). I'm ready to start looking at doing a travel assignment starting in August of this year. I'd like to eventually work in FL and CA, but my understanding is that I need a SSN to work in these states. What do you think about the idea of doin a short assignment in MN (which is a walk-through state) and applying for a SSN as soon as I get a TN Visa before August or September so I could apply to work in CA or FL for the winter months?

I'm considering working for an agency first (to get my foot in the door and learn the system), but I would like to learn about becoming an independent contractor to avoid having a % of my paycheck going to an agency. I have 6 years' ICU experience and 1 year as an ER nurse and I'm ready to consider travel nursing as a real career move (rather than a one-off contract for 13 weeks). Can anyone chime in with their experience or legal knowledge about this aspect? I'd love to learn about how to go about being independent and not having to give away a % to a company so I need to somehow learn about the tax laws and other legal issues. As I've mentioned, I'm just setting out to learn at the moment so any advice and direction would help.

Another tangible question I have is this: which of the 50 states can I work in without a SSN?

Thanks for any help!
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Type: Question • Score: 2 • Views: 1,651 • Replies: 5
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Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Mar, 2011 08:32 am
@BlueKat600,
I am not familiar with the actual laws/rules by state, however, my brother did work as a traveling nurse for a couple of years. Great way to see many different areas of the US and typically you go to areas where there are population increases during certain times of year that are great places - he worked in FL, San Diego and Palm Springs.

He used an agency. I'd suggest you using one as well as they can guide you through any sort of paper work and what you will need.
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Miller
 
  1  
Reply Thu 10 Mar, 2011 10:17 am
@BlueKat600,
Whatever you decide to do, remember you'll be in competition with RNs who are US citizens. With the economy as poor as it is in the US, I suspect you'll have trouble with finding assignments.

Good luck.
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Robert Gentel
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Apr, 2011 08:56 pm
@BlueKat600,
BlueKat600 wrote:
I'm considering working for an agency first (to get my foot in the door and learn the system), but I would like to learn about becoming an independent contractor to avoid having a % of my paycheck going to an agency. I have 6 years' ICU experience and 1 year as an ER nurse and I'm ready to consider travel nursing as a real career move (rather than a one-off contract for 13 weeks). Can anyone chime in with their experience or legal knowledge about this aspect? I'd love to learn about how to go about being independent and not having to give away a % to a company so I need to somehow learn about the tax laws and other legal issues. As I've mentioned, I'm just setting out to learn at the moment so any advice and direction would help.


In my experience (I am not a nurse but was the marketing director of one of the largest travel nursing agencies and now operate the largest online nursing employment network) it's not easy for nurses to travel independently, the employers who hire travel nurses usually don't want to employ them directly for a variety of reasons.

That isn't to say that it can't be done, but the hospitals pay the agency for a reason, and they often won't offer you the same rates directly.

Incidentally, the industry is hurting right now. The nursing shortage that it relies on almost disappeared during the recession and for the first time in a while nurses have been having a hard time finding a job. So if you find it difficult now, realize that the whole industry has been turned on its head for a few years.
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ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Tue 26 Apr, 2011 09:01 pm
This is neither here nor there but to wish you well - I used to live across the street from a four-plex that rented to nurses showing up locally. Good people, by and large.
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groonurse
 
  1  
Reply Thu 28 Apr, 2011 08:30 pm
@BlueKat600,
Hi BlueKat600
Make some cold calls to hospitals in the States that you want to go to. Pick a city and google the numbers. I travelled that way and found it quite good to do, some hospitals paid way more relocation than the agency was willing to cough up.
If the US economy is keeping nursing jobs down, Come down to Australia. Your Canadian education transfers over, your registration is quite cheap and there is more than enough work to keep you busy. There are agency jobs down here as well. There are many private hospitals that will keep you employed. Go onto seek.com.au and look for jobs in Brisbane, Sydney, Gold Coast, Newcastle, Melbourne. Stay away from South Australia which has a Health Authority that is millions of dollars in debt and it is run by idiots.
If you know of any perioperative nurses.... scrubs, circulators, send them to me... we are desperate here in Newcastle in the private sector for nurses that know their stuff or want to work in great places.
I am a Canadian and with the economy in North America being what it has been for the past 2 years, I have been working in Australia here and apart from the crisis in South Australia, I am loving the climate, the work and the pay in NSW. No longer on 457 visa, went onto Permanent Resident status cuz this place is too good to be true.
groonurse.
PS If you do come down, can you bring me some Shreddies?
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