Reply Sun 23 Jan, 2011 01:42 pm
Quote:
In the case of child beauty pageants, Orenstein offers a shrewd critique of why media exposés of the phenomenon are so perennially popular. They “give viewers license, under the pretext of disapproval, to be titillated by the spectacle, to indulge in guilty-pleasure voyeurism,” she observes. “They also reassure parents of their own comparative superiority by smugly ignoring the harder questions: even if you agree that pageant moms are over the line in their sexualization of little girls — way over the line — where, exactly, is that line, and who draws it and how?” Orenstein allows us to watch her struggle with these questions, and when she arrives at a few answers, they feel well earned.

Orenstein finds one such enlightening explanation in developmental psychology research showing that until as late as age 7, children are convinced that external signs — clothing, hairstyle, favorite color, choice of toys — determine one’s sex. “It makes sense, then, that to ensure you will stay the sex you were born you’d adhere rigidly to the rules as you see them and hope for the best,” she writes. “That’s why 4-year-olds, who are in what is called ‘the inflexible stage,’ become the self-­appointed chiefs of the gender police. Suddenly the magnetic lure of the Disney Princesses became more clear to me: developmentally speaking, they were genius, dovetailing with the precise moment that girls need to prove they are girls, when they will latch on to the most exaggerated images their culture offers in order to stridently shore up their femininity.” For a preschool girl, a Cinderella dress is nothing less than an existential insurance policy, a crinolined bulwark to fortify a still-shaky sense of identity.

Orenstein is especially sharp-eyed on the subject of what comes after the princess phase, for in the micro-segmented world of marketing to children, there is of course a whole new array of products aimed at girls who begin to tire of their magic wands. These include lines of dolls with names like Moxie Girlz and Bratz: “With their sultry expressions, thickly shadowed eyes and collagen-puffed moues, Bratz were tailor-made for the girl itching to distance herself from all things rose petal pink, Princess-y, or Barbie-ish,” Orenstein notes. “Their hottie-pink ‘passion for fashion’ conveyed ‘attitude’ and ‘sassiness,’ which, anyone will tell you, is little-girl marketing-speak for ‘sexy.’ ”
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/23/books/review/Paul-t.html

This all sounds right, and much better said than I have heard it done before. I certainly don't disapprove of teaching little girls to be feminine, but his reminds me of when we push little kids in academics starting almost at birth, only to see them rebel and drop out of school or otherwise turn their back on the exercise in their teens.......it seems like too much too early...
 
Ceili
 
  3  
Reply Sun 23 Jan, 2011 01:49 pm
This is about advertising not education.
hawkeye10
 
  -3  
Reply Sun 23 Jan, 2011 01:53 pm
@Ceili,
Quote:
This is about advertising not education
the article is about the corporate class taking advantage of something going on in our society to make money...I am not interested in the making money or the corporate america angle, as I long ago made up my mind about that, but this thing that goes on with little girls and their parents is very interesting and not very well explored to this point. The sexing up of little girls is very new in our culture, and we should figure out what this is all about.
Intrepid
 
  4  
Reply Sun 23 Jan, 2011 02:00 pm
@hawkeye10,
hawkeye10 wrote:

The sexing up of little girls is very new in our culture, and we should figure out what this is all about.


...and something that you have made very clear that you are very interested in from many threads.
hawkeye10
 
  -3  
Reply Sun 23 Jan, 2011 02:05 pm
@Intrepid,
Quote:
...and something that you have made very clear that you are very interested in from many threads.
I am very interesting in gender identity and teen rights, but that is not what you mean because you have your head in the gutter..

I have repeatedly said that I am not sexually interested in young females, but that I dont have a problem with young females that are interested in older men or older men who are interested in them....with-in reason.
Intrepid
 
  4  
Reply Sun 23 Jan, 2011 02:07 pm
@hawkeye10,
If my head is in the gutter it would only be to get down to where you can hear me.
0 Replies
 
 

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