H2O MAN
 
Reply Mon 8 Nov, 2010 03:42 pm
(Hindu Times)- U.S. President Barack Obama on Sunday regretted that the “great religion” of Islam has been distorted by a few extremists to justify violence towards innocent people and called for isolating these elements.

Mr. Obama also said that people will have to fundamentally reject the notion that violence is the way to mediate differences among them.

“I think all of us have to fundamentally reject the notion that violence is the way to mediate our differences,” he added.

The US president expressed these views when a Muslim student A. Ansari lobbed a question asking for his views on ‘jihad” during his interaction with students of St Xavier’s college here.

“I think all of us recognise that this great religion (Islam) in the hands of a few extremists has been distorted to justify violence towards innocent people that is never justified,” he said.

“So, one of the challenges the world faces is how to “isolate” those who have these distorted notions of religious war…and reaffirm those who see faces of all sorts whether you are a Hindu or a Muslim or a Christian and a Jew or any other religion that we can all treat each other with respect and mutual dignity,” he added.

Mr. Obama said the phrase ‘Jihad’ has different interpretations. Islam is one of the great religions and majority of its one billion practices believe in peace, justice and tolerance, he added.


No wonder Muslim extremists are all ramped up. They see weakness in our leaders.
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Walter Hinteler
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Nov, 2010 04:05 pm
From the Full Transcript:

Quote:
Question: Hi, good day, sir. Hi, my name is Anna and I'm from St. Davis College. My question to you is, what is your take on opinion about jihad, or jihadi? Whatever is your opinion, what do you think of them?

Barack Omaba: Well, the phrase jihad has a lot of meanings within Islam and is subject to a lot of different interpretations. But I will say that, first, Islam is one of the world's great religions. And more than a billion people who practice Islam, the overwhelming majority view their obligations to their religion as ones that reaffirm peace and justice and fairness and tolerance. I think all of us recognize that this great religion in the hands of a few extremists has been distorted to justify violence towards innocent people that is never justified.

And so I think one of the challenges that we face is how do we isolate those who have these distorted notions of religious war and reaffirm those who see faiths of all sorts - whether you are a Hindu or a Muslim or a Christian or a Jew or any other religion, or your don't practice a religion - that we can all treat each other with respect and mutual dignity, and that some of the universal principles that Gandhi referred to - that those are what we're living up to, as we live in a nation or nations that have very diverse religious beliefs.

And that's a major challenge. It's a major here in India, but it's a challenge obviously around the world. And young people like yourselves can make a huge impact in reaffirming that you can be a stronger observer of your faith without putting somebody else down or visiting violence on somebody else.

I think a lot of these ideas form very early. And how you respond to each other is going to be probably as important as any speech that a President makes in encouraging the kinds of religious tolerance that I think is so necessary in a world that's getting smaller and smaller, where more and more people of different backgrounds, different races, different ethnicities are interacting and working and learning from each other.

And those circumstances - I think all of us have to fundamentally reject the notion that violence is a way to mediate our differences.
0 Replies
 
H2O MAN
 
  0  
Reply Mon 8 Nov, 2010 04:42 pm
Question: Hi, good day, sir. Hi, my name is Anna and I'm from St. Davis College. My question to you is, what is your take on opinion about jihad, or jihadi? Whatever is your opinion, what do you think of them?

Barack Omaba: Well, the phrase jihad has a lot of meanings within Islam and is subject to a lot of different interpretations. But I will say that, first, Islam is one of the world's great religions. And more than a billion people who practice Islam, the overwhelming majority view their obligations to their religion as ones that reaffirm peace and justice and fairness and tolerance. I think all of us recognize that this great religion in the hands of a few extremists has been distorted to justify violence towards innocent people that is never justified.

And so I think one of the challenges that we face is how do we isolate those who have these distorted notions of religious war and reaffirm those who see faiths of all sorts - whether you are a Hindu or a Muslim or a Christian or a Jew or any other religion, or your don't practice a religion - that we can all treat each other with respect and mutual dignity, and that some of the universal principles that Gandhi referred to - that those are what we're living up to, as we live in a nation or nations that have very diverse religious beliefs.

And that's a major challenge. It's a major here in India, but it's a challenge obviously around the world. And young people like yourselves can make a huge impact in reaffirming that you can be a stronger observer of your faith without putting somebody else down or visiting violence on somebody else.

I think a lot of these ideas form very early. And how you respond to each other is going to be probably as important as any speech that a President makes in encouraging the kinds of religious tolerance that I think is so necessary in a world that's getting smaller and smaller, where more and more people of different backgrounds, different races, different ethnicities are interacting and working and learning from each other.

And those circumstances - I think all of us have to fundamentally reject the notion that violence is a way to mediate our differences.
JTT
 
  2  
Reply Mon 8 Nov, 2010 04:49 pm
@H2O MAN,
All I see, which you seem hell bent on illustrating to all, are the weaknesses in your cognitive functions, H20man.
H2O MAN
 
  1  
Reply Mon 8 Nov, 2010 06:09 pm
@JTT,
Blindness is your weakness.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  2  
Reply Wed 10 Nov, 2010 06:35 pm
@H2O MAN,
H2O MAN wrote:

I think all of us recognize that this great religion in the hands of a few extremists has been distorted to justify violence towards innocent people that is never justified.


"Innocent people" is another little phrase that is subject to a lot of different interpretations.
farmerman
 
  0  
Reply Wed 10 Nov, 2010 09:54 pm
Is the spurt trying to dispense our daily dose of paranoia?

Is there someone with some antidepressents for the spurt?
0 Replies
 
Finn dAbuzz
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Nov, 2010 03:57 pm
@roger,
roger wrote:

H2O MAN wrote:

I think all of us recognize that this great religion in the hands of a few extremists has been distorted to justify violence towards innocent people that is never justified.


"Innocent people" is another little phrase that is subject to a lot of different interpretations.


Interesting Roger.

Is there some identifiable segment of the whole of jihadi victims that doesn't measure up to your interpretation of "innocent people?"

roger
 
  1  
Reply Mon 15 Nov, 2010 04:34 pm
@Finn dAbuzz,
Well, there are people (I suppose) who violently attack Islam, or advocate such. They've lost their innocence in this context. What would you say about a Danish cartoonist, though? Or people who chuckle at the cartoons? Participating in "Draw Muhammod Day" sound pretty innocent, to me.
0 Replies
 
 

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