4
   

Mexican Journalists Flee Drug War, Seek Asylum

 
 
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Oct, 2010 10:33 am
@Butrflynet,
I'm glad that you're reading my stuff. Smile

(But I still find the headline from the NPR report to be misleading)

0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Oct, 2010 11:43 am
@fbaezer,
How do you think this is all going to turn out fbaezer?

(i know...ridiculously big question)
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Oct, 2010 02:10 pm
@dlowan,
Ridiculously big question.

I dunno.

I'd know a bit if the United States had a semblance of a consistent drug policy.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 6 Oct, 2010 02:31 pm
@fbaezer,
Do you think it's a serious threat to mexicos long term stability?


I thought the us did have a consistently nutty drug policy?
fbaezer
 
  2  
Reply Wed 6 Oct, 2010 03:46 pm
@dlowan,
No, to your first question. Not in the long run.

As for your second question:
The US hasn't decided whether drug consumption should be prosecuted or not. Law enforcement about it varies from state to state. Some states have decided it is too expensive to put drug users into trials; others insist in doing so. Then there's California. If they legalize pot, then what?
The US is also in a quagmire about selling weapons to smuglers. Most of the weapons doing the bloodshed in Mexico are sold in the USA by legal armory salesmen. Since there is no real checking on who buys it -because of the nth. amendment, some a2kers will know the number- the flow goes on.
IMO the US strategy about drugs has been to pulverize possible internal drug cartels and let them have "true competition" for the drugs markets, while preventing them to become a menace to the national State. They have problems similar to Mexico's -drug related violence, cops and politicians corrupted by the drug gangs-, but to a lesser, containable, level. At the same time politicians usually pay a lot of lip service to a "zero tolerance" policy that had NEVER been implemented.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Oct, 2010 07:40 am
@fbaezer,
Out of interest, what do you think a drug policy SHOULD look like?
fbaezer
 
  5  
Reply Thu 7 Oct, 2010 04:18 pm
@dlowan,
--A lot more stress should be put on money laundering (in both sides, it is calculated that 70% of the profits stay in the US), with specialized intelligence work (now most of the laundered money discovered is by serendipity). The problem, in both countries, is that fighting money laundering means stepping into business interests (mostly in the financial and real state sectors).
--There should be more of a follow-up about weapons. I mean, a Mexican without documents in the US ("an illegal alien") has trouble getting a driver's license, but can readily buy hand granades. Any weapons taken from the cartels should be easier to track... and whoever sold them to the criminals should be punished.
--Mariguana should be decriminalized in both countries. It accounts to nearly 60% of the business, and is less harmful than the other drugs.
--There is a good iniciative in Mexico's Congress now, about a unified police. Most (sadly, not all) of the police-cartels corruption is at municipal ("county") level. According to that strategy, all municipal police will be monitored, and only those corporations who "pass the test" will remain. The others will be dismantled, and the unified (state under the surveillance of the Federation) police will take over.

All this said, those measures will not end the mafias. They would keep on traficking with the drugs that remain illegal, and may turn into other illegal businesses, specially extortion and person traficking. But they would certainly hinder their performance.
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Oct, 2010 05:37 pm
@fbaezer,
So, if I want to buy a hand granade, I should ask an illegal alien? I can't think of any other source.
fbaezer
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Oct, 2010 05:48 pm
@roger,
You may have to ask school kids.

Here's a tale from a teacher in Texas: (www.theteacherscorner.net/forums/showthread.php?t=5616)

Quote:
All of my fifth grade boys were clustered around a classmate. When I asked the boys what they were doing, they dispersed ... save for one child who had something cradled under his jacket. It turned out that he had a Vietnam era hand grenade that his father had purchased at a garage sale.

I confiscated the grenade and took it to the assistant administrator who was also a Vietnam vet.

"Is this real?" I asked as I gave him the grenade.

"HOLY S**T!" shouted the administrator. "I don't see any seams."

He called the police. The police took the grenade to their firing range, pulled the pin, and tossed the grenade. It exploded.

The police subsequently came to school and talked to my student. They wanted to know WHERE the garage sale had been.

It turned out that the person who had conducted the garage sale had sold off an automatic rifle, several fragmentation hand grenades, and a smoke grenade.

Can you imagine what might have happened if my 5th grader had pulled the pin on his grenade thinking that it was inert?
roger
 
  1  
Reply Thu 7 Oct, 2010 06:37 pm
@fbaezer,
I don't think I'm going to call something illegally smuggled in from Vietnam to be readily available. There may even be a full automatic Thompson left over from the Al Capone era, but the number just isn't going to be significant.
fbaezer
 
  3  
Reply Thu 7 Oct, 2010 07:08 pm
@roger,
Ok, perhaps I exaggerated saying hand granades were "readily" available, Roger.
But tell me, where does this **** (confiscated from the cartels) come from?

http://www.creativehaus.mx/wordpress/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/GulfCartelArsenal_1.JPG

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_voXjwGqbQVo/SRVTqdIcpLI/AAAAAAAABio/7b3IwewePzs/s320/arsenal.jpg

http://www.terra.com/fotos/resize_gallery?p=/addon/img/5d6a19-sinaloa_armasp.jpg&res_vert=301x464&res_hor=619x464
(nice hand granades on the lower left)

http://eleconomista.com.mx/files/imagecache/nota_completa/detenidos1-ok.jpg

http://www.plumaslibres.com.mx/foto/8085aa34c020d45fde53dbce2f0e00c7_lanzacohetes.jpg

http://t3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:tgbDW2yPfA5k3M:http://img580.imageshack.us/img580/9324/35t35trt3.jpg&t=1
fbaezer
 
  3  
Reply Thu 7 Oct, 2010 07:20 pm
And those ******* guns are incresingly killing innocent bystanders.

Just two days ago, a group of cartel thugs tried to kill a custodian from the main prison in Monterrey, while he was on leave downtown. The man was wounded. A visual arts university student who was passing by was killed.

http://www.horacero.com.mx/admin/images/fotos/Nacional/1/NHCVL38224/F1.jpg

WHO FINANCED THE BULLET THAT KILLED HER?
WHO SOLD THE WEAPON?
WHERE?!!!!!
roger
 
  2  
Reply Thu 7 Oct, 2010 09:11 pm
@fbaezer,
Damn. I was all primed up to tell you how many garage sales I had been to without seeing a single one.

I don't know where it comes from. We do have a nice big common border, but firearms have manufacturers who sell to wholesalers. If the wholesaler orders 200 ARsomethingorothers, you take his beginning inventory, add purchases, subtract sales, and if there is a discrepancy then that wholesaler has to explain the difference. I worked for a company that went through an ATF audit, and we spent several months trying to explain what happened to one lousy, little explosive tubing cutter. I'm sure if a significant quantity were coming from the US, someone besides myself could figure out the arithmetic.

Now, if this is where they are, in fact coming from here, all the reasoning and arithmetic in the world isn't going to change it. It just doesn't seem likely to me. You do illustrate a motley collection or ordinance, though. Maybe they really are being bought up piece meal and shipped out.
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Oct, 2010 04:28 pm
@roger,
Quote:
Maybe they really are being bought up piece meal and shipped out.

Brought "up"? Or did you mean to say brought "in"? Surely you didn't mean to say brought up from south of the border and shipped out right back to south of the border?
Butrflynet
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Oct, 2010 05:09 pm
@InfraBlue,
InfraBlue wrote:

Quote:
Maybe they really are being bought up piece meal and shipped out.

Brought "up"? Or did you mean to say brought "in"? Surely you didn't mean to say brought up from south of the border and shipped out right back to south of the border?


bought, not brought -- as in purchased, not carried.
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Oct, 2010 06:20 pm
@Butrflynet,
Geez, thanks.

I think I need to get a new prescription for eyeglasses.
0 Replies
 
roger
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Oct, 2010 06:39 pm
@InfraBlue,
What I meant to say was "bought up", as in "bought up".
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Fri 8 Oct, 2010 08:45 pm
@fbaezer,
Jesus wept
0 Replies
 
InfraBlue
 
  1  
Reply Sat 9 Oct, 2010 09:59 am
Carjackings drive home fear in Juárez

Quote:
As murder numbers skyrocket in Juárez, another crime there is becoming even more common: carjackings.

Chihuahua state records show that carjackings peaked in August at 341, more than the city's 333 murders in the same month. Since 2008, 5,643 people have reported carjackings in Juárez compared with 86 in El Paso in the same period.

...

An official with the Chihuahua state attorney general's office who works in the vehicle-theft unit said carjackings happen at any time of the day anywhere in the city. The official asked not to be named because of security concerns.
The victims are 60 percent women and can be of any age. The carjackers are equally diverse, sometimes even families with children.

...

The official said the surges in carjackings and homicides are no coincidence. He said many of the cars are used for kidnappings and to carry out attacks.

In addition, some carjackings result in homicides, especially when the victim resists. "We tell the people to act with integrity if they are carjacked, to think about their lives first," he said.

...

The investigator said these armed robberies are not necessarily tied to drug-cartel violence, although some stolen vehicles are later found at crime scenes or used by alleged drug traffickers and kidnappers.

"Unfortunately, with all the violence, many people are taking advantage and committing these types of crimes," he said.

For instance, police recently arrested a family who was carjacking people who were selling their vehicles. Family members would look for ads in the newspaper, go see the car, test it and then pull out a gun and drive away.[/url]

Because of the virtually complete breakdown of law and order in Ciudad Juárez caused by the drug war, there has been an increase in crimes not directly related to the drug war itself by people taking advantage of the anarchy like in the example of the carjacking family. There are stories about women being abducted in the streets in broad daylight, raped and dumped on other streets in other parts of the city.
0 Replies
 
electronicmail
 
  1  
Reply Sun 10 Oct, 2010 10:07 am
@fbaezer,
fbaezer wrote:

And those ******* guns are incresingly killing innocent bystanders.

WHO FINANCED THE BULLET THAT KILLED HER?
WHO SOLD THE WEAPON?
WHERE?!!!!!

The US is guilty for buying the drugs? The US is also guilty for selling the guns? Mexico is not a party to those transactions? 'Scuse ME I thought you needed a buyer AND a seller.

This part is even more disgusting:
Quote:
WHO FINANCED THE BULLET THAT KILLED HER?

Gun and drug dealers take credit cards? What's the interest rate on those credit cards, do you know? Who issues them?
 

Related Topics

20 Years Ago: Our Earthquake - Discussion by fbaezer
Mexico City - Question by fbaezer
Mexican Federales Fire on US Embassy vehicle!!! - Discussion by Lustig Andrei
Experiences with Mexican Dentists - Question by maxdancona
Mexico City approves gay marriage - Discussion by ossobuco
Mid-term elections in Mexico, July 5 - Discussion by fbaezer
Mexico deporting Illegals? - Discussion by Baldimo
Mexican Elections 2024 - Discussion by fbaezer
 
Copyright © 2024 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 05/28/2024 at 02:24:45