9
   

Who would you write a fan letter to?

 
 
aidan
 
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 01:03 am
I have only written two fan letters in my life, which surprises even me, seeing as how I love so many forms of entertainment- music, books, movies- and really value the people who produce these works of art and entertainment.

Anyway - one fan letter I wrote was to the woman who wrote the book, 'Iron Shoes'. I can't even remember her name now, but I was so touched by that book that when I finished it, I sat down and wrote her a letter. She wrote me back! She said, and I remember this, 'Every writer dreams of a reader like you.'
I also wrote a letter to Jeanette Winterson after reading her book 'Oranges are Not the Only Fruit'.

Lately, every night when I get home from work, my daughter and I watch two episodes of Thirty Rock together. We just sit here together and laugh and laugh and it's a time that I've really come to look forward to and value and I was thinking last night that I owe such a debt of gratitude to Tina Fey for this lovely time I'm having laughing with my daughter. I'm going to write her a fan letter to say thank you.

Would you ever write a fan letter? And if so - to who(m) and what would you say?

*Edited to say that I think I should have titled this thread, 'To Whom Would You Write a Fan Letter?' -please excuse my bad grammar.
 
BillRM
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 04:47 am
@aidan,
Quote:
Would you ever write a fan letter? And if so - to who(m) and what would you say?


There is a history professor by the name of Bob Packett who along with his wife had produced wonderful podcasts on all aspects of history.

After downloading hundreds of his podcasts for free over the last few years, I send him a letter telling him how must I had enjoyed his podcasts and appreciate his and his wife work.

I also included two token BN gift cards with the letter for him and his wife who act as his webmaster.

For anyone who is interest in history here is the link http://www.summahistorica.com/.
Intrepid
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 06:07 am
@aidan,
Nobody
Ceili
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 08:28 am
@Intrepid,
Only once, a photographer by the name of Finbarr O'Reilly. He mostly takes photos of the the poor in the war torn nations of African.
I was compelled. His work is stunning.
He wrote me back, thanked me and wished me a merry xmas.
BumbleBeeBoogie
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 10:39 am
@aidan,
I would write to Nobel Peace Prize winner Muhammad Yunus, the originator of the Grameen Bank in a tiny Banglladeshi village in 1976.

Grameen Bank began with a simple but revolutionary concept: Loan poor people money on terms that are suitable to them and teach them sound financial principles so they can achieve financial self-sufficiency.

Grameen Bank was created in 1976 when Professor Muhammad Yunus, then head of the Rural Economics Program at the University of Chittagong, loaned $27 from his own pocket to 42 people in the tiny Bangladeshi village of Jobra after seeing the vicious cycle of poverty exacerbated by predatory money lenders. These women only needed just enough credit to purchase the raw materials for their trades. The borrowers repaid his small loans promptly and inspired Yunus to establish the Grameen Bank Project, which then spread among villages and districts across Bangladesh with the help of his devoted students.

In October 1983, the Grameen Bank Project was transformed into an independent bank by government legislation. Professor Yunus founded the bank on a belief that credit is a basic human right and that borrowers are not simply borrowing from a bank, but are committed to a philosophy built upon four core principles: discipline, unity, courage, and hard work. Today, Grameen Bank is owned by the borrowers of the bank and remains devoted to providing the poorest of Bangladesh with microcredit loans that spark initiative and enterprise and empower the poor to lift themselves out of poverty.

As of June 2010, Grameen Bank has disbursed more than $9.4 billion to over 8.1 million borrowers, 97% of whom are women. The bank is represented in 2,564 branches and offers service in over 81,000 villages throughout rural Bangladesh. As a testament to the strength of the Grameen model, there are now 141 Grameen replication projects in 38 countries. The Grameen concept has created an effective and sustainable response to world poverty and the Bank’s success has advanced the concept of microcredit around the globe.

In 2006, Professor Muhammad Yunus and Grameen Bank were jointly awarded the “for their efforts to create economic and social development from below.” Additionally, in 2009 he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by U.S. President Barack Obama, an honor reserved for those that have made "an especially meritorious contribution to the security or national interests of the United States or to world peace or to cultural or other significant public or private endeavors." Professor Yunus is widely regarded as the pioneer of the microcredit industry and continues to challenge conventional thinking, identify new ways to empower unbanked entrepreneurs, and explore new possibilities in microcredit and social business around the world.

Grameen America

"New York City is the world capital of banking. In these skyscrapers that New York built, they control world finance. What I pointed out is that they do the banking with the world but they don’t do the banking with their neighbors. We are here to show that there is nothing wrong with doing banking with neighbors. So we hope we will create some confidence in them. If we change the banks' mind, the whole world will change."

- Muhammad Yunus, May 17, 2010,Grand Opening of Grameen America's Manhattan branch

Grameen America was founded upon the belief that the system that has succeeded with remarkable results in the villages of Bangladesh could work in urban America. Professor Yunus believes that for the world to really take notice of the power of microfinance, it has to work in the capital of international finance, New York City. Under the façade of New York City’s grandeur, there exists a huge population of underserved people who do not have access to banks and mainstream financial institutions. Grameen America opened its doors in January 2008 during the largest financial crisis of the modern era.

Despite being a new player in the domestic microfinance industry, Grameen America has experienced considerable growth during its first year. In the first three months, Grameen America disbursed more than $350,000 in micro-loans and had over 165 borrowers.

A Grameen America branch opened in Omaha, Nebraska in Summer 2009, making it the first microfinance instutition in Omaha and Grameen America’s first operational branch outside of New York City. As a result of the growing demand in NYC, Grameen America opened two additional branches in the boroughs of Manhattan and Brooklyn in January 2010. All branches have experienced rapid growth in the short period they have been operational.

Grameen America continues to expand the reach of microcredit across the United States, with two additional branches in development in California and Washington, DC.

Developmental efforts are underway in Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and North Carolina for additional expansion.
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 10:51 am
I haven't personally written any fans letters, but on a lighter note - my brother used to and he would use my name and address as well.

I was in college and I found a post card with a "hunky" soap star on it - come to find out my younger brother as a joke wrote to him with my name and college address. Great - hopefully no one I knew was working in the mail room that day.

He also had an ongoing writing "pen pal" sort of relationship with an older soap star. I think this older soap star thought my brother looked to him as a mentor sort of relationship - it started as a joke, but they did correspond back and forth for several years.
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 12:05 pm
It was not exactly a fan letter I wrote to Bobby Kennedy, urging him to run for president. His reply was a stock letter his office sent to most letter writers. I kept it all these years, because it bore what looks like his, but is probably an electronically produced signature.

I wrote a couple of fan letters to Phillip Wylie. One urged him to do more screen plays. Another sort of chewed him out for being harsh with 60s left-wing radicals, but also praised the bulk of his writing.
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 10:00 pm
@Ceili,
Thank you for replying. Finbarr O'Reilly is amazing. I can't even express what this photo does to me, except to say that it moves me beyond speech:

http://i85.photobucket.com/albums/k46/aidan_010/Mail%20Attachments/child_soldier_congo1.jpg
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 10:05 pm
@edgarblythe,
Believe it or not - I didn't know who Philip Wylie was. Now I do. Thank you.
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 10:05 pm
@BumbleBeeBoogie,
I'd read about this. Definitely worthy of fans and duplication.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 10:07 pm
@Ceili,
Thank you for the name of Finbarr O'Reilly, Ceili.
0 Replies
 
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 10:09 pm
@BillRM,
Bill - I clicked on a podcast but couldn't get it to come up - I was trying to view the one about the French and Indian war. Do you know what I need to do other than click on it to view it?
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 10:12 pm
I wrote a letter to Roger Cohen once; I've followed him off and on, always interested in what he says whether or not his take mirrors mine or vice versa. It was a short note related to an article he wrote and a book I thought he should know about related to that. No answer. Well, I figure he was busy. Or thought the book was idiotic.
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 10:12 pm
@Linkat,

Quote:

He also had an ongoing writing "pen pal" sort of relationship with an older soap star. I think this older soap star thought my brother looked to him as a mentor sort of relationship - it started as a joke, but they did correspond back and forth for several years.
Yeah - brothers...I know of what you speak.
At least your brother got something out of it.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 Aug, 2010 10:29 pm
@ossobuco,
This does remind me that when I was turning thirteen, I was recruited as part of the fan club for the Crew Cuts. That was ok, I was glad to be asked. About a week later, we became the Elvis Presley fan club. I'd never heard of him...

I remember not getting it.

So it goes..







That same year, my friend, well, my best friend, who was clearly more advanced than I (don't worry, I made up for it) as we walked to the neighborhood of a boy she liked (my mother called her boy crazy)... went crazy over Marlon Brando..


I did have a Cannonball Adderley record, though.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cannonball_Adderley

Would that I still had that...
0 Replies
 
Reyn
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Aug, 2010 03:50 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

It was not exactly a fan letter I wrote to Bobby Kennedy, ...

That reminds me of the time I sent a birthday card to Nikita Khrushchev (same day as me), when I was a kid in the 60s.

Never got a reply of any kind, of course, or a reciprical card. Wink
edgarblythe
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Aug, 2010 04:23 pm
@Reyn,
Ah, yes. The man who banged his shoe at the UN. He declared of the USA: "We will bury you." We got him back by refusing him entrance to Disneyland.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Aug, 2010 06:35 pm
I'm not a writer of fan letters, but the closest I ever got to doing such a thing was to the political journalist, John Pilger, whose work I admired enormously:

Quote:
John Richard Pilger (born 9 October 1939[1]) is an Australian journalist and documentary maker, based in London. He has twice won Britain's Journalist of the Year Award, and his documentaries have received academy awards in Britain and the US.[2][3] Noam Chomsky said of Pilger: "John Pilger's work has been a beacon of light in often dark times. The realities he has brought to light have been a revelation, over and over again, and his courage and insight a constant inspiration."[4]

In Breaking the Silence: The Television Reporting of John Pilger, his appraisal of the journalist's documentaries, Anthony Hayward wrote, "For more than a generation, he has been an ever stronger voice for those without a voice and a thorn in the side of authority, the Establishment. His work, particularly his television documentaries, has also made him rare in being a journalist who is universally known, a champion of those for whom he fights and the scourge of politicians and others whose actions he exposes."[5] .....


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Pilger

So you get some idea of why he was something of a hero to me?

Once, during my volunteer community radio days, I worked up the courage to ring him in London, for a short interview. He was so utterly obliging, more than happy talk at length .... & wanting to discuss recent Oz political developments ... Such an unexpected response for this amateur reporter that I was rendered almost speechless. Embarrassed Smile
plainoldme
 
  1  
Reply Fri 27 Aug, 2010 09:51 pm
I wrote one to writer Ron Rosenbaum but haven't sent it.
aidan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 28 Aug, 2010 12:36 am
@msolga,
Quote:
Diego Garcia
Pilger's 2004 film Stealing a Nation told the story of the people of the Chagos Islands in the Indian Ocean. In the 1960s and 70s, British governments expelled the entire population of the Chagos Archipelago, dumping them in the slums of Mauritius. The aim was to give the principal island of this Crown Colony, Diego Garcia, to the Americans who wanted it as a major military base, from where US planes have since bombed Afghanistan and Iraq. The International Criminal Court later described this act as "a crime against humanity". Pilger strongly criticised Tony Blair for not making any real response to the 2000 High Court ruling that the British expulsion of the island's natives to Mauritius in order to make way for a US Air Force base had been illegal.[12]

In March 2005, Stealing a Nation was awarded Britain's most prestigious documentary prize, the Royal Television Society Award.

In May 2006, the UK High Court ruled in favour of the Chagossians in their battle to prove they were illegally removed by the UK government during the depopulation of Diego Garcia, paving the way for a return to their homeland. The leader of the Chagos Refugee Group, Olivier Bancoult, described it as a "special day, a day to remember". In May 2007, the UK Government's appeal against the 2006 High Court ruling was dismissed and they took the matter to the House of Lords. In October 2008, the House of Lords ruled in favour of the Government, overturning the original High Court ruling.


This is incredible to me! What a horrible abuse of power, and what a wonderful use of his skill to expose what happened to these people/

I don't understand how the original high court ruling could have been overturned though. I thought that the UK didn't have the right of eminent domain the way the US does. I'm going to see if I can find out more about why they didn't have the original ruling upheld.
Thanks for posting this msolga.

*I just read about the actual use of eminent domain or compulsory appropriation. Were these people compensated in any way for this land? This reminds me of what was done to the Native American when they were moved off their lands and on to reservations. The incredible thing is that this only just happened in the sixties and seventies.
0 Replies
 
 

 
  1. Forums
  2. » Who would you write a fan letter to?
Copyright © 2021 MadLab, LLC :: Terms of Service :: Privacy Policy :: Page generated in 0.03 seconds on 04/11/2021 at 11:01:28