5
   

OMG! IT'S ALIVE!!!!

 
 
Reply Tue 6 Apr, 2010 06:38 pm
This is so freaky!

Last fall Mr. B found this big cocoon on a piece of kindling. He scraped it off, put it in a baggie and Mo took it to his bug loving teacher at school.

Months passed. The cocoon was returned to Mo and he stuck it in his backpack.

Today we pulled it out and the cocoon had hatched with this HUGE moth.

I swear this thing is about 3.5" long.

Because the wood came from Mr. B's office, and because he gets wood from all over the world, we took it to bug loving teacher for identification since lately there have been several invasive species of bug introduced to our region that are killing off crops. Turns out this is a native species (whew!).

It's wing is a little crushed so we have it in an aquarium with a variety of foliage right now.

The moth looks sorta like this:

http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v453/n7199/images/4531146a-i1.0.jpg

Are there certain things we should try to feed it while it's wing rehabs?

Thanks!
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Type: Question • Score: 5 • Views: 1,791 • Replies: 19
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tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Tue 6 Apr, 2010 06:46 pm
@boomerang,
Quote:
Well, most moths are quite fond of sugar water. No one quite knows why they prefer this particular mixture, but they sure do chow down on it. What you do, is you mix together water (doesn't matter if it is warm or cold...just don't make it freezing or piping hot) with A LOT of sugar. Then, you put a cotton ball into the mixture and let it soak it up. The reason you want to put it into a cotton ball is because if you just put it in a bowl, the moth may drown in its food. Kind of squeeze out some excess water, not a lot, just so the moth can't drown in it, then you're set to go.

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/What_would_you_feed_any_moth

0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Apr, 2010 06:54 pm
Yay! I have sugar! I have water! I might be able to find a cotton ball!

Thank you!
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Apr, 2010 06:57 pm
@boomerang,
Whatcha going to name him or her?
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Apr, 2010 08:42 pm
Few moths live more than a couple of weeks, some only a few days. Don't stress about feeding it, it will probably soon be in moth heaven either way.
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Apr, 2010 09:14 pm
@Green Witch,
There's no telling how long the darn thing has been alive in a ziploc bag full of cocoon goo in Mo's backpack so I'd feel bad if I didn't at least try to feed it.
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Tue 6 Apr, 2010 09:19 pm
It seems that some can live for quite a long time:

Quote:
Total Life Span
Total life span includes time spent in the larval and pupal stages, as well as the adult stage. Each species description in Butterflies and Moths of North America includes the number of annual "flights" for that species. A flight is a generation of adults. Thus, if a species has "two flights from May through September" it means that one generation will emerge from the pupal stage in spring and a second in summer. Actual months of emergence depend on latitude. Life spans of these two generations will be very different depending upon the species’ strategy for getting through the winter.

If the spring flight comes from eggs that were laid in fall by the previous year's summer flight, the total life span for the spring flight is 10-11 months. Eggs laid in May/June by those adults develop much more rapidly, due to higher temperatures, and adults emerge in about 2-3 months, resulting in a total life span of 3½-4 months for the summer flight, or less than half that of the spring flight. However, if the species is one in which adults of the summer flight overwinter, then the spring flight develops from eggs laid in spring, and in this case the summer flight is the longer-lived generation.

Not all species have two flights per year. Some species, particularly northern ones, have only a single flight annually, or a total life span of about a year. Some Arctic butterflies are believed to have a 2-year life cycle due to the extremely short growing season and the scarcity of high quality food for the larval stage. And some desert species, which normally have a life cycle of only one year, may hibernate as larvae or pupae for up to 7 years waiting for adequate rainfall to ensure growth of the host plant. On the other hand, southern species may have numerous fast-developing but short-lived generations each year. Finally, among the many species that are distributed over a wide latitudinal zone, it is not uncommon for northern populations to have one or two flights annually while more southerly populations have many flights annually. In some cases, the number of flights is considered taxonomically significant; for example, the Eastern and Canadian tiger swallowtails are now recognized as separate species, partially based on the fact that the Canadian species has only one flight per year vs 2-3 for the Eastern species.
0 Replies
 
Ionus
 
  2  
Reply Tue 6 Apr, 2010 10:30 pm
@boomerang,
Before I get attached to it, I would want to know if it is a boy moth or a girl moth. Will it grow into Mothra ? Or the mothman ? So many questions, so few answers..
dadpad
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2010 01:20 am
Quote:
It seems that some can live for quite a long time:

Thats reletive to what you think is "quite a long time". The primary purpous of an adult moth is to mate and lay eggs. Once thats done its curtains for mr/mrs moth. The reason they need sugar and water (nectar from flowers) is because the mating period is a frenzy of activity, there is a high demand for instant energy that can only be supplied by nectar.

Putting your sugar water into hollow golf tees of different colours may encorage the moth to feed. Press the golf tees into a piece of styrofoam packing to keep them upright. Top up each day with an eye dropper.
You can also use plastic bottle tops that are screwed to a piece of wood however getting a seal where the screw goes through the cap is problematic. Use silastic/silicon sealer.

The key thing is the bright colours.
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2010 01:28 am
1. A butterfly flies by day, and a moth by night. There are some day flying moths and butterflies that fly at dusk.
2. A butterfly always has a feeding mechanism (proboscis), whereas a moth often does not. These moths simply do not eat as adults as they have done all their eating as larvae.
3. A butterfly rests with its wings closed and a moth lands with them open. A notable exception are the butterflies of the Hamadryas genus (Nymphaliinae) that always land with their wings laid flat.
4. A butterfly forms a pupae hanging. A moth forms a cocoon, usually on the ground.
5. The antennae of a butterfly are straight and club-like. The antennae of a moth vary greatly but are usually brush like with a great deal more surface area.
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  2  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2010 01:30 am
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:

This is so freaky!

Last fall Mr. B found this big cocoon on a piece of kindling. He scraped it off,
put it in a baggie and Mo took it to his bug loving teacher at school.

Months passed. The cocoon was returned to Mo and he stuck it in his backpack.

Today we pulled it out and the cocoon had hatched with this HUGE moth.

I swear this thing is about 3.5" long.

Because the wood came from Mr. B's office, and because he gets wood from all over the world, we took it to bug loving teacher for identification since lately there have been several invasive species of bug introduced to our region that are killing off crops. Turns out this is a native species (whew!).
He is an American citizen!





David
0 Replies
 
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2010 01:30 am
Apparently male butterflys have claspers.

i'm just throwing that out there for dlowan
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2010 02:57 am
@dadpad,
dadpad wrote:

Apparently male butterflys have claspers.

i'm just throwing that out there for dlowan


I don't believe you.
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2010 04:19 am
@dlowan,
Would I lie to you lil bunnykins?
0 Replies
 
Green Witch
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2010 04:43 am
If you post a picture of the actual moth I can probably get you an ID. We will then know if it will be a good pet or not. Is the wing so smashed it can't fly? They often survive bird attacks and can fly with tattered wings.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2010 04:46 am
@Ionus,
Ionus wrote:

Before I get attached to it, I would want to know if it is a boy moth or a girl moth. Will it grow into Mothra ? Or the mothman ? So many questions, so few answers..

Good set of questions!!

If it grows up to be the next great Mothra, think of the revenue stream!! Think of Boomerang Airlines!! A Green alternative to jetting across the country!
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2010 05:13 am
@tsarstepan,
tsarstepan wrote:
Ionus wrote:

Before I get attached to it, I would want to know if it is a boy moth or a girl moth.
Will it grow into Mothra ? Or the mothman ? So many questions, so few answers..

Good set of questions!!

If it grows up to be the next great Mothra, think of the revenue stream!!

Think of Boomerang Airlines!! A Green alternative to jetting across the country!
Mo can be the pilot!





David
0 Replies
 
OmSigDAVID
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2010 05:16 am

Presumably, he weighs less.
0 Replies
 
farmerman
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2010 05:50 am
@boomerang,
Heres a male Cecropia    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/90/Hyalophora_cecropia_adult_male_sjh.JPG/800px-Hyalophora_cecropia_adult_male_sjh.JPG

YOU can tell by its fuzzier antennae and the smaller abdomen

Heres a female, same species

     http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/99/Hyalophora_cecropia_adult_female_sjh.JPG/800px-Hyalophora_cecropia_adult_female_sjh.JPG
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Wed 7 Apr, 2010 08:45 am
She hasn't opened her wings yet -- that's why I think she can't fly. She is actively trying to escape her enclosure though!

She really is beautiful. We all hope she's able to fly away soon.
0 Replies
 
 

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