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Odd Cultural Traditions and Quirks of Society: Photo Gallery

 
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2011 01:12 am
@tsarstepan,
That's a rather confusing image, tsar.

In another cultural context ..... well, you know!
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2011 01:33 am
@cicerone imposter,
Has anyone posted the Balinese Monkey Dance?


dlowan
 
  2  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2011 01:44 am
@dlowan,
dadpad
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2011 02:07 am
Dont think I've ever seen the dreamtime team play before
Thanks for that dlowan
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2011 02:10 am
@dadpad,
They had SPEARS!!!
0 Replies
 
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2011 01:20 pm
@dlowan,
I always enjoy cultural shows, and saw a somewhat similar show in New Zealand back in 1999 when I visited Australia, NZ, and Fiji.

Thanks for sharing that video.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2011 01:56 pm
@dlowan,
That monkey dance looks like it would fit appropriately in an Indiana Jones film.
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2011 06:10 pm
@tsarstepan,
This one's REALLY weird:

tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2011 06:30 pm
@dlowan,
Yep. Something VERY sinister about thoses Canadians and their CURLING! Shocked
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sat 16 Apr, 2011 06:34 pm
@tsarstepan,
This one's horrific....not for the fainthearted:

0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 May, 2011 09:43 pm
I think we all know what'll happen if TSA gets wind of this...

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01891/card-cucumber_1891689i.jpg
Bai Dengchun throws playing cards like they were knives, cutting through a cucumber held in a man's mouth. The 23-year-old from Qingdao in northern China's Shandong Province can throw a card so that it slices through a cucumber, bursts balloons or breaks eggs...
Picture: Quirky China News / Rex Features

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01891/cards-melon_1891692i.jpg
...Standing three metres away from a watermelon, he can throw 28 cards so they become embedded in the fruit like knives.
Picture: Quirky China News / Rex Features
raprap
 
  1  
Reply Thu 12 May, 2011 10:02 pm
0 Replies
 
raprap
 
  1  
Reply Fri 13 May, 2011 06:03 am
@Irishk,
0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Sun 15 May, 2011 01:25 pm
http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01886/longest-cigar_1886724i.jpg
People look at the world's longest cigar, resting on tables in El Morro, an old Spanish fort overlooking Havana Bay. The cigar stretches 268 feet 4 inches (81.8 metres), or most of the length of a football field. If it is officially accepted by Guinness World Records in London, it will eclipse the previous record of 148 feet 9 inches (45.38 metres), both rolled by Jose Castelar Cairo, also known as "Cueto".
Picture: REUTERS
0 Replies
 
Irishk
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 12:02 pm
Coolest hotel room ever!!!

http://i.telegraph.co.uk/multimedia/archive/01904/tree-hotel_1904574i.jpg
This is the Mirrorcube Room, part of the Treehotel resort in Harads, Sweden. Well off the beaten track, 40 miles south of the Arctic Circle, this hotel consists of five rooms, each designed by a different Swedish architect, nestled anywhere between six and 40 feet up in the pines. The most striking room is the Mirrorcube, which is coated in a reflective material that causes it to blend into the surrounding forest.
Picture: TREEHOTEL / BARCROFT USA
0 Replies
 
Old Goat
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 12:54 pm
Eccentric traditions? In Britain?

So......many.....brain ......hurts.....

There are so many, we've even made a calendar....

http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/curious/calendar.htm
0 Replies
 
Old Goat
 
  2  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 01:00 pm
Here is one of my favourites.....

Abbots Bromley in Staffordshire.
The ancient Horn Dance is an annual event held traditionally on the first Monday after the first Sunday after September 4th!
The famous Horn Dance is performed by six Deer-men who wear reindeer horns. The dancers follow a 10 mile course and perform the ritual in 12 different locations in and around the village, whilst the musician plays tunes such as “The Farmers Boy” and “Uncle Mick” on a melodeon, with accompaniment from a triangle.

(extra note - I watched a programme on TV not long ago where they carbon dated one of the antlers and found that they pre-dated the Normans. Some say that they are of Viking origin!)


http://www.woodlands-junior.kent.sch.uk/customs/curious/images/horn.jpg
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Wed 25 May, 2011 06:19 pm
@Old Goat,
Well that's an impressively vintage tradition Old Goat! Smile
0 Replies
 
talk72000
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 May, 2011 11:27 am
@Old Goat,
Normans are the French descendants of Vikings.
cicerone imposter
 
  1  
Reply Thu 26 May, 2011 03:03 pm
@talk72000,
a2k never ceases to educate and amaze. The Normans history is very interesting, and far-reaching in Europe.

From Wiki.
Quote:
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
This article is about the people. For other uses, see Norman (disambiguation).
Norman expansion by 1130

The Normans were the people who gave their name to Normandy, a region in northern France. They were descended from Norse Viking conquerors of the territory and the native population of mostly Frankish and Gallo-Roman stock. Their identity emerged initially in the first half of the 10th century, and gradually evolved over succeeding centuries.

They played a major political, military, and cultural role in medieval Europe and even the Near East. They were famed for their martial spirit and eventually for their Christian piety. They quickly adopted the Romance language of the land they settled, their dialect becoming known as Norman or Norman-French, an important literary language. The Duchy of Normandy, which they formed by treaty with the French crown, was one of the great fiefs of medieval France. The Normans are famed both for their culture, such as their unique Romanesque architecture, and their musical traditions, as well as for their military accomplishments and innovations. Norman adventurers established a kingdom in Sicily and southern Italy by conquest, and a Norman expedition on behalf of their duke led to the Norman Conquest of England. Norman influence spread from these new centers to the Crusader States in the Near East, to Scotland and Wales in Great Britain, and to Ireland.
0 Replies
 
 

 
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