10
   

Congo: The World Capital of Killing

 
 
ossobuco
 
  -2  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 08:33 pm
@Robert Gentel,
You don't need projected status updates as we work out our thoughts.
Let us all be taut thinkers, the new mode. And let none of us shilly shally as we get there. Certainly we should never post before we get to definitive.
I hope you are happy in your capsule.
hawkeye10
 
  3  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 08:38 pm
@littlek,
Quote:
Imagine all we could do in Africa if we were expending so many man-hours and billions in Iraq.


it would not matter, compassion fatigue set in long ago. Constant wars and famine is what Africa is known mostly for, followed closely by human brutality....both political (dictators killing their own people)and cultural (the slicing off of clits), followed by AIDS and and and....

It is just too much, Africa is a lost cause for most people.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 08:45 pm
@ossobuco,
I just looked. RG gave me 32 minutes to come back with links. One was the Le Carre book, but I was already blasted.

Sorry, but whip time is not that interesting to me.

dlowan
 
  4  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 08:50 pm
@edgarblythe,
edgarblythe wrote:

We apparently only fight wars of immediate self interest. If the Congo had something by which we could profit, the military would be on the way.


Not sure if it is being asked of the US to fight.

The article first posted quotes a doctor suggesting a stronger international effort to put pressure on the countries who have people in the Congo committing atrocities (eg Rwanda) and some leadership on control of "conflict minerals."
Quote:
“Sometimes I don’t know what I am doing here,” Dr. Mukwege said despairingly. “There is no medical solution.” The paramount need, he says, is not for more humanitarian aid for Congo, but for a much more vigorous international effort to end the war itself:

That means putting pressure on neighboring Rwanda, a country so widely admired for its good governance at home that it tends to get a pass for its possible role in war crimes next door. We also need pressure on the Congolese president, Joseph Kabila, to arrest Gen. Jean Bosco Ntaganda, wanted by the International Criminal Court on war crimes charges. And, as recommended by an advocacy organization called the Enough Project, we need a U.S.-brokered effort to monitor the minerals trade from Congo so that warlords can no longer buy guns by exporting gold, tin or coltan.

Unless we see some leadership here, the fighting in Congo " fueled by profits from mineral exports " will continue indefinitely. So if we don’t act now, when will we? When the toll reaches 10 million deaths? When Jeanne is kidnapped and raped for a third time?


Here is a site, ENOUGH, talking about conflict minerals:

http://www.enoughproject.org/conflict-minerals


It suggests some actions people can take, like buying "conflict free" materials.



International Crisis Group analysis and suggested solutions:

http://www.crisisgroup.org/home/index.cfm?id=2829


Strategy Paper:

http://www.crisisgroup.org/home/index.cfm?id=6209&l=1


Suggestions for actions contained in these papers: (I don't know how good they are)


Quote:
2. What should be done

In its latest report Congo: A Comprehensive Strategy to Disarm the FDLR, Africa Report N°151, 9 July 2009, Crisis Group made the following recommendations:

To the Government of Congo:

1. Suspend operation “Kimia II” and refrain from any further military offensive against the FDLR at this time, shifting priority to protecting the Kivu population against FDLR attacks and reprisals by establishing protected areas close to rebel-held territory and controlling major roads day and night.

2. Participate in the planning and implementation of a new FDLR disarmament strategy as described below.

3. Actively pursue normal relations with Rwanda, notably by establishing cross-border development projects within the framework of the Economic Community of the Great Lakes Countries and by jointly analysing the region’s traumatic history within the framework of the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR), so as to foster reconciliation between Congolese and Rwandans.

To MONUC:

4. Reinforce the training given FARDC brigades and assign military mentors to Congolese units.

5. Insert civilian specialists into the joint FARDC-MONUC military planning unit and facilitate the design of civil-military cooperation projects aimed at protecting civilians and building confidence between civilians and Congolese security forces.

6. Ensure the 3,000 reinforcements authorised by UN Security Council Resolution 1853 are speedily deployed in eastern Congo.

7. Reinforce the Disarmament, Demobilisation, Repatriation, Reintegration and Resettlement (DDRRR) section with specialists in intelligence and psychological operations, as well as legal experts who can develop cases for prosecution of crimes committed during the Congo’s violent conflicts.

To the members of the international facilitation of the Nairobi communiqué (AU, EU, U.S., UN):

8. Establish a mechanism for strategic management of FDLR disarmament and demobilisation composed of military and civilian MONUC personnel, Congolese and Rwandan officials, specialists from facilitation countries, and liaison officers with Interpol, the International Criminal Court and the World Bank, to formulate a new FDLR disarmament strategy and to coordinate the activities of all international entities " military and civilian " involved in its implementation. This strategy should include:

a) intensive counter-propaganda and other sophisticated psychological operations targeting the FDLR rank and file for voluntary disarmament;

b) offers of third country relocation to those who do not wish to return to Rwanda or settle in Congo;

c) action within the scope of national laws to limit the ability of the FDLR political leadership living in countries such as France, Belgium, Germany, the U.S., Canada, Cameroon, Zambia and Kenya to operate freely, including, where such a possibility exists under their domestic law, investigation and prosecution of leadership members for complicity in war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in eastern Congo;

d) selection and training of eight battalions of the Congolese national army (the FARDC) dedicated to cordon and search operations in support of special forces operations, with offensive military actions against the FDLR not to be undertaken before this training is completed and a clear military doctrine has been established for the force; and

e) operations by Rwandan special forces focusing on neutralising the FDLR command and control structure.

To the Government of Rwanda:

9. Participate in the planning and implementation of a new FDLR disarmament strategy as described above.

10. Submit a revised list of FDLR leaders suspected of participation in the 1994 genocide.

11. Take part in technical discussions under the auspices of UN Special Envoy Obasanjo with FDLR officers not included in the list with respect to the conditions of their repatriation or relocation under international supervision.

12. Actively pursue normal relations with the DRC, notably by establishing cross-border development projects within the framework of the Economic Community of the Great Lakes Countries and by jointly analysing the region’s traumatic history within the framework of the International Conference on the Great Lakes Region (ICGLR), so as to foster reconciliation between Congolese and Rwandans.





0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 08:58 pm
@ossobuco,
Please, not that is is all right - I can guess there are disputations - but for background, read http://www.amazon.com/Mission-Song-Novel-John-Carre/
The Mission Song. I don't equate this reality, but it gives some film of the complexities..

ossobuco
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 10:10 pm
@ossobuco,
I'm not sure what that zero was about, re the le carre book. I asssume it wasn't up to date - but it was a starter.
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 11:33 pm
@ossobuco,
Having read a bit about the Congo, I'd like to hear more.
ossobuco
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 11:37 pm
@ossobuco,
and why does that mean I get to be zeroed down.
ossobuco
 
  -3  
Reply Mon 8 Feb, 2010 11:54 pm
@ossobuco,
a readable book -

http://www.johnlecarre.com/book.php?id=20
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  -3  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 12:02 am
Well, I liked that book, but I would as I follow le Carre.

But I don't take him as all there is out there, for writing.

More writing, please..
ossobuco
 
  -3  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 12:09 am
@ossobuco,
Will the person knocking me down just speak up? I might even agree in part.

hawkeye10
 
  3  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 12:12 am
@ossobuco,
oh, I am so sorry. Did I just wreck your attempt at a a2k all time record for consecutive posts?
ossobuco
 
  -4  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 12:18 am
@ossobuco,
the submission

ok, correcting the error..
0 Replies
 
ossobuco
 
  -3  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 12:19 am
@hawkeye10,
whatever
0 Replies
 
Robert Gentel
 
  5  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 01:35 am
@ossobuco,
ossobuco wrote:
Will the person knocking me down just speak up? I might even agree in part.


21 of 33 replies to this thread (22 out of 34 now, which is why I'd been trying to not provide you a pretext to continue) are by you or hints directed at you to stop monopolizing the thread with inanity. It couldn't be any clearer. Please take it elsewhere and stop ruining this thread.
0 Replies
 
Seed
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 04:41 am
Not to take anything away from what is going on in the Congo by any means. But as soon as this conflict ends another one will start up. The world is not happy with itself unless there is massive blood shed. Be it over drugs, religion or precious stones, people will find a reason to kill.

What is wrong with people that they feel the need to take the life of someone over something so small and stupid. ( As I have taken lives in my stint in the military, I know how arbitrary my comment might seem)

What bothers me so much is that with everything that is going on, it is not main stream media. You can turn on the news and not hear a thing about any of it. Has the world become so easily blind on such horrible dealings?
0 Replies
 
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 06:07 am
@Robert Gentel,
Robert Gentel wrote:

The World Capital of Killing

Quote:
It’s easy to wonder how world leaders, journalists, religious figures and ordinary citizens looked the other way while six million Jews were killed in the Holocaust. And it’s even easier to assume that we’d do better.

But so far the brutal war here in eastern Congo has not only lasted longer than the Holocaust but also appears to have claimed more lives. A peer- reviewed study put the Congo war’s death toll at 5.4 million as of April 2007 and rising at 45,000 a month. That would leave the total today, after a dozen years, at 6.9 million.

What those numbers don’t capture is the way Congo has become the world capital of rape, torture and mutilation, in ways that sear survivors like Jeanne Mukuninwa, a beautiful, cheerful young woman of 19 who somehow musters the courage to giggle. Her parents disappeared in the fighting when she had just turned 14 " perhaps they were massacred, but their bodies never turned up " so she moved in with her uncle.

A few months later, the extremist Hutu militia invaded the home. She remembers that it was the day of her very first menstrual period " the only one she has ever had.



In my opinion, the term Holocaust, denoting the murder of six million Jews during WWII, is a misnomer, since the Holocaust was 12 million, of which six million Jews were killed as part of The Final Solution (a planned hunt to exterminate Jewry). The non-Jewish six million (to make 12 million in total) included those that the Third Reich had felt were expendable, either as slave labor, or problematic to the Reich.

So, in my opinion again, I am cautious when the term Holocaust is used as a metaphor, since it often refers incorrectly to six million European Jews only, and does not focus on the Final Solution as the actual atrocity of a planned hunt to exterminate a people. If the term Holocaust is used correctly, or the term Final Solution is used correctly, I can accept an analogy; otherwise, I always wonder why a current atrocity cannot stand on its own legs, so to speak, without attempting to compare it incorrectly to what occurred in WWII as a very unique atrocity.
Seed
 
  3  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 06:20 am
@Foofie,
Terminology aside, either act on either side is something that should not be happening. The fact that the term was used in the analogy was to merely state the horribleness of what is going on in the world at this time.
Foofie
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 09:42 pm
@Seed,
Seed wrote:

Terminology aside, either act on either side is something that should not be happening. The fact that the term was used in the analogy was to merely state the horribleness of what is going on in the world at this time.


Sure; many people do not care to parse definitions. There is an entire bellcurve out there to write for as an audience.
Seed
 
  1  
Reply Tue 9 Feb, 2010 09:52 pm
@Foofie,
Well consider me part of that bellcurve.
0 Replies
 
 

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