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The noughties - a decade of lost species

 
 
msolga
 
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 07:15 am
From the Guardian (UK.)

The noughties decade has spelled the end of some species of plants & animals. Ten examples:


http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2009/10/21/1256128158923/Decade-Extinct-Species-Ba-002.jpg

The Baiji dolphin (Lipotes vexillifer)

Also called Changjiang, Chinese lake, white flag, whitefin or Yangtze River dolphin - is probably the most threatened cetacean species in the world. The last documented sighting of the species was in 2002 and surveys in 2006 failed to find any individuals in its native Yangtze River in China. The species has been listed as critically endangered since 1996, but in 2007 it was reassessed as and flagged as possibly extinct. Entanglement in fishing gear, electric fishing practices, boat propeller strikes, dam construction, river siltation (from deforestation and agricultural expansion), and pollution have all contributed to the dramatic declines of this species
Photograph: Nick Gordon/Ardea

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Type: Discussion • Score: 3 • Views: 6,504 • Replies: 15
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 07:17 am
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2009/10/21/1256127719849/Black-Rhino-004.jpg

Western black rhino (Diceros bicornis longipes)

Listed as critically endangered (possibly extinct). The total population of this species almost certainly numbers less than 50 mature individuals, and in fact may already be extinct. Recent surveys throughout much of putative range in northern Cameroon have failed to record any individuals but found widespread evidence of poaching. Like most other black rhino populations, this subspecies has undergone a decline exceeding 80% over the past 50 years or so, and it is feared extinct.
International Rhino Foundation
Rhino Resource Center
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 07:19 am
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2009/10/21/1256127728074/Golden-Toad-011.jpg

Golden toad (Incilius periglenes)

Once a common species, no specimen has been seen since 1989 in Costa Rica. It last bred in normal numbers in 1987, and its breeding sites were well known. In 1988, only eight males and two females could be located. In 1989, a single male was found, and was the last record of the species. Extensive searches since this time have failed to produce any more records (as of August, 2007)
Photograph: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 07:21 am
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2009/10/21/1256127722377/Hawaiian-Crow-006.jpg

The Hawaiian crow (Corvus hawaiiensis)


Listed as extinct in the wild after the last two known individuals disappeared from Hawaii in 2002. Habitat alteration, collecting and shooting, introduced predators (including rats and the Indian mongoose) and predation from the native Hawaiian hawk, and avian malaria and pox carried by introduced mosquitoes have contributed to the crow’s decline. Some individuals remain in captive breeding facilities and a reintroduction plan is being developed
Photograph: U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service
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msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 07:26 am
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2009/10/21/1256127729185/Pachnodus-velutinus--012.jpg

Pachnodus velutinus

Regionally extinct in the Seychelles. Range contraction has been observed since 1972 and no pure specimens have been located since 1994 despite careful searches
Photograph: Dr. Justin Gerlach
0 Replies
 
dlowan
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 07:41 am
Damn.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 07:47 am
@dlowan,
Thanks for that comment, Deb. You might have shortened the "flood prevention" time before I can post more. (About 8 minutes to go, I think.) If I don't get through all these 10 tonight, that'll be why.
Oh & please feel free, anyone, to post any other examples you know of.

http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2009/10/21/1256127734086/St-Helena-Redwood-016.jpg

St Helena redwood (Trochetiopsis erythroxylon)

A tree endemic to St Helena and now extinct in the wild. After settlers arrived on the south Atlantic island, the species was heavily exploited for its excellent timber and bark which was used for tanning hides. By 1718, the species was already extremely rare. Further losses occurred when flax plantations began in the late 1800s. By the mid 20th century, only one redwood survived and this single tree is the source of all the redwoods known in cultivation today. Inbreeding depression and a limited gene pool form the most serious threat to the future survival of this species
Photograph: ARKive/Andrew Darlow

0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 07:49 am
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2009/10/21/1256127732727/Poo-uli-Black-faced-Honey-015.jpg

Poo-uli (Melamprosops phaeosoma)

The Po'o-uli, also known as the black-faced honeycreeper, is endemic to Maui in the Hawaiian islands, where it was discovered in 1973. The species has been listed as critically endangered (possibly extinct). Of the three known individuals in 1998, one died in captivity in 2004 and the remaining two individuals have not been seen since 2003 and 2004. Continuing surveys in all areas of potential habitat are needed to confirm that no other individuals survive
Photograph: Paul E. Baker/USFWS
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 07:51 am
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2009/10/21/1256127718759/Scimitar-horned-Oryx-003.jpg

Scimitar-horned oryx (Oryx dammah)

Once one of the most common large mammals of northern Africa. Overhunting for the animal’s meat, hide and magnificent horns, combined with habitat loss, caused major declines in the species. By the end of the 20th century none were known to remain in the wild. Currently listed as extinct in the wild, the species is now part of a major captive breeding and reintroduction programme
Photograph: Joel Sartore/NG/Getty Images
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 07:53 am
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2009/10/21/1256127731321/Spixs-macaw--014.jpg

Spix's macaw (Cyanopsitta spixii)

Listed as critically endangered (possibly extinct), it was found in Brazil, in parts of the Brazilian state of Bahia. Although this species exists in several captive populations, the last known individual in the wild disappeared at the end of 2000, and no others may remain, primarily as a result of trapping for trade and habitat loss. However, it cannot yet be listed as extinct in the wild until all areas of potential habitat have been thoroughly surveyed
Photograph: NG/Getty creative
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 07:55 am
http://static.guim.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2009/10/21/1256127735691/Wood-s-Cycad-Encephalarto-017.jpg

Wood’s cycad (Encephalartos woodii)

Listed as extinct in the wild. Only a single plant of this species was ever found in South Africa. Its extinction may have been a natural event, although the final end of the wild population may have been hastened by over-exploitation for medicinal purposes by local people. In 1916 the last remaining stem was removed for cultivation in botanical gardens. There is no likelihood of ever reintroducing the species back into the wild as there are only male plants in existence, and the risk of theft would be too great
Photograph: Andrew McRobb/RBG Kew
0 Replies
 
djjd62
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 07:56 am
great thread, sad but great
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 07:59 am
@djjd62,
(And I got through the 10 without more flood prevention!)

Thanks djjd. As I said before, anyone who knows of other examples, please feel free to add to these.
0 Replies
 
ehBeth
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 08:06 am
@msolga,
Do you have a link? I'm trying to make sense of their methodology.
0 Replies
 
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 08:15 am
Will do. I'll supply it in a minute, ehBeth.
It's simply part of The Guardian's ongoing publication of a number of such environmental issues. (they're terrific) You won't find much more in the link for this particular series of photographs than what I've already posted, though.
msolga
 
  1  
Reply Sun 17 Jan, 2010 08:18 am
@msolga,
Here you go, ehBeth.:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/gallery/2009/oct/21/decade-lost-species
0 Replies
 
 

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