6
   

Disney Finally Concedes Implicitly - the Baby Einstein Videos and CD's Don't Work!

 
 
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Wed 28 Oct, 2009 02:19 pm
@Linkat,
Awww.... just hang on to them. In another 10 years "they'll" start saying that by not letting babies watch TV that we're denying them a rich, multi-faceted, cultural environment necessary for learning, socializing and great success in life -- or something like that. Your video will be worth a fortune.
Linkat
 
  1  
Reply Wed 28 Oct, 2009 02:38 pm
@boomerang,
Yeah but no one will have video players any more.... at least I can get a couple of bucks for it - if I still have the damn thing - I might have given it away as we never even opened it.
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  2  
Reply Wed 28 Oct, 2009 11:42 pm
Can You Make Your Baby Smarter, Sooner?

NPR's Talk of the Nation tackles the subject quite well. But that's par for the course.

HOST:
Neal Conan;

GUESTS:
Jon Hamilton, science correspondent, NPR
David Elkind, professor emeritus of child development at Tufts University
Janet Doman, director of the Institutes for the Achievement of Human Potential

Quote:
October 28, 2009
Disney's offering refunds to millions of parents who purchased Baby Einstein videos, hoping to give their infants an educational jump-start. Videos have been discredited, redirecting emphasis on the importance of interaction between parents and babies for proper development.


http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=114247630
boomerang
 
  2  
Reply Thu 29 Oct, 2009 07:44 am
@tsarstepan,
Thanks for the link, that was interesting.

This

Quote:
HAMILTON: Yeah. And one thing we haven't mentioned here is it's not just about the capacity to learn, it's about the motivation to learn. And I think for many parents, the hardest thing is not to get the kid to be able to read a word in a book, but to want to read the words in a book because they want to know what's there.


...is a fight I continue to have with Mo's school. I feel that more than teaching him to read, they're teaching him to hate to read.
DrewDad
 
  2  
Reply Thu 29 Oct, 2009 09:54 am
@boomerang,
Have you tried comic books? (er... graphic novels?)
boomerang
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Oct, 2009 10:08 am
@DrewDad,
He doesn't seem to like them much.

The problems is -- the stories he likes are written above his grade level. The things he can read bore him. The things I read with/to him, he loves -- he'd do this all day long. We read together a lot.

He reads just a fraction below grade level which, in third grade, due to NCLB, is a big problem. He has some developmental delays. I firmly believe that he'll catch up when it's appropriate for him. In the meantime I read him "Ten True Tales: WW2 Heros" and the school gets pissed off about it.
DrewDad
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Oct, 2009 11:26 am
@boomerang,
boomerang wrote:
"Ten True Tales: WW2 Heros" and the school gets pissed off about it.

How sad.

I expect you're already trying the few strategies that I can think of....
0 Replies
 
tsarstepan
 
  1  
Reply Thu 29 Oct, 2009 11:45 am
@boomerang,
The whole concept of teaching children to excel at standardized testing is absolutely flawed. That's one reason I jumped ship from my education minor during my first attempt at college.

http://preaprez.files.wordpress.com/2007/08/nclb-cartoon.gif
Quote:
The things I read with/to him, he loves -- he'd do this all day long. We read together a lot.


Quote:
I firmly believe that he'll catch up when it's appropriate for him


boomerang
Either your instinct or you're filtering out the right messages from whatever media sources you've been exposed, you assessment of your own child seems to be quite intuitive and dead on the target. It's a damn shame that the school system doesn't realize that your seemingly circuitous route to getting Mo up to speed on his ability to read and love doing it at the same time is the best way to help Moe academically. It's not like what you're doing is an alien practice. At least in an anecdotal sense, I heard this dozens and dozens of times, regarding the slow start of boys learning to read. The fact that he's a captivated audience when you are reading with him? That's a definitely sunny sign that he'll become an avid reader when the reading skills he WILL eventually learn will come to him.

My only caveat to my above statement is that perhaps you should make due care to rule out any ... reading disabilities Mo might have. Either way, keep reading to him. Very Happy
0 Replies
 
boomerang
 
  3  
Reply Thu 29 Oct, 2009 01:26 pm
I'm not the least bit worried about him; Mo will do just fine.

The school wants him dianosed with ADD so they pooh-pooh the diagnosis we received from a incredible child development clinic at a nationally regarded children's hospital.

Anyway.... I've been "invited" to "join" the faculty at a "team meeting" to determine the course of Mo's education.

That's an invitation I will most assuredly be accepting!

Life in the real world trenches with a less than stellar student makes things like wanting your Baby Einstein money back because it didn't make your baby smarter kinda funny.
0 Replies
 
 

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